University of Fashion Blog

Posts Tagged: "runway"

WHAT TO EXPECT IN FASHION 2019

Team Maison Martin Margiela (Courtesy:Edward Enninful Instagram)

Team Maison Martin Margiela (Courtesy:Edward Enninful Instagram)

Diversity and inclusion have not always been synonymous with the fashion industry, but in 2018 fashion finally “got woke.” Millennials and Gen Zers, the industry’s new generation of consumers, are much more politically active and brands are now realizing that to stay relevant, they need to take a stand on racism, gun control and socio-political issues. The age of ‘corporate neutrality’ is over.

Watchdogs like Diet Prada have become the fashion police, calling out brands for their missteps. With one million Instagram followers (and growing), the duo of Tony Liu and Lindsey Schuyler are a force to be reckoned with.

Nike’s decision to take a stand, using Colin Kaepernick in its 30th anniversary ad campaign, turned out to be a one of its smartest marketing moves yet. Gucci, who has been taking a stand on issues since 2013 with their ‘Chime for Change’ campaign (advocating for women’s rights and anti-poverty efforts), took on gun control in 2018 with a $500,000 donation to March for Our Lives, in support of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Other designers have supported gun control over the past few years too, including Kenneth Cole, Tom Ford, Christian Siriano and Zac Posen.

For those brands who are clinging to ‘neutrality’ for fear that they’ll alienate their customer base, we offer this information, because learning from past mistakes is one thing, but putting what is learned into practice is another. So, let’s reflect back and then take a peek into the future of where fashion has been and where it hopes to go (and grow).

LOOKING BACK TO MOVE FORWARD

Historically, fashion as an industry has primarily catered to a “rich, thin and white” demographic. Think Charles Frederick Worth (1856) and all of those lovely French aristocrats, and the birth of haute couture. It wasn’t until the Industrial Revolution, the invention of standardized sizing followed by the concept of ready-to-wear, that fashion’s demographic expanded. However, fashion marketing and advertising lagged behind in terms of diversity and inclusion, especially within fashion magazines, runway models, and even among fashion designers.

 DIVERSITY: IN MAGAZINES

 Donyale Luna, Beverly Johnson, Naomi Campbell (Courtesy: Pinterest)

Donyale Luna, Beverly Johnson, Naomi Campbell (Courtesy: Pinterest)

The first black woman to grace a fashion magazine cover was Donyale Luna, who appeared in British Vogue in March 1966, shot by photographer David Bailey. The iconic cover image showed Luna covering most of her face, which was allegedly a request of the magazine’s editors to help mask her ethnicity. At the time, it was not popular to put a colored woman in a high-level fashion brand, nor on a luxury fashion magazine cover. Donyanle Luna, an American, is known as the first black supermodel.

It took 8 more years for U.S. Vogue to feature a woman of color. In 1974, Beverly Johnson broke America’s glass ceiling with her Vogue cover photographed by Francesco Scavullo. Johnson’s blackness was not itself the subject of the cover. Instead, Vogue presented a vision of elegant beauty that was relatable, real, and totally about the times. But as Johnson said herself, it was not easy to get there due to her race.

It took 14 more years for French Vogue to feature a woman of color on their cover. In 1988 Naomi Campbell became the first colored woman in the magazine, even though she had been working with renowned designers. In fact, Yves Saint Laurent threatened to take away their magazine advertising in order to make this happen.

Gemma Ward & Du Juan (Courtesy: Pinterest)                    Fei Fei Sun (Courtesy: Vogue)

Gemma Ward & Du Juan (Courtesy: Pinterest) Fei Fei Sun (Courtesy: Vogue)

The lack of diversity in magazines was not exclusive to Afro descendants. The Asian community only got its first model cover in 2005, shot Patrick Demarchelier for French Vogue.  However, Chinese model Du Juan had to share the cover with Australian supermodel Gemma Ward. It would take another 8 years for an Asian model to get a solo cover, this time Fei Fei Sun for Italian Vogue in 2013.

These examples of models from diverse backgrounds were more often treated as tokens or novelties, rather than representing a real market demographic. Fashion brands didn’t see the need for including these and other diverse populations and therefore neglected a broader share of the market. By placing importance on ‘exclusiveness’, rather than realizing and embracing the idea of diversity and inclusion, brands actually missed a major opportunity for increased profitability.

DIVERSITY: ON THE RUNWAY

Eleanor Lambert’s Battle of Versailles 1973 fashion show

Eleanor Lambert’s Battle of Versailles 1973 fashion show

Diversity on the fashion runway was non-existent until 1973 when American publicist Eleanor Lambert introduced American fashion to Europe at the Palace of Versailles. Lambert was the first to use 12 black models in her fashion show. However ground-breaking that 1973 show was, several decades would pass with predominately white models walking the runway, featured in advertising campaigns and on magazine covers.

HOW GLOBALIZATION AFFECTED THE FASHION INDUSTRY

By 2008 things began to change in fashion as a result of globalization. An increase in international travel and intercultural exposure, a high volume of migration and mass movement of consumers, as well as the rapid growth of information and communication though social media platforms, were all catalysts for change. Society was evolving, and this was no better reflected than in the election of the first black U.S. president, Barack Obama, followed by the first woman chancellor elected in Germany, Angela Merkel. Increased visibility for the LGBTQ movement around the world, social responsibility and the sustainability movement all came together to awaken the world and the fashion industry.

 

(Courtesy:Vogue)

(Courtesy:Vogue)

In July 2008, U.S. Vogue published an article entitled, Is Fashion Racist? The article addressed the elephant in the room. It spoke to how fashion runway shows concentrated on a single homogeneous look, “the same procession of anonymous, blandly pretty, very young, very skinny, washed-out blondes with their hair scraped back.”  This acknowledgement, in such a highly regarded publication, forced the industry to rethink their strategy. The problem was not only a lack of diverse models on the runway, but also in magazines, in fashion campaigns and other related fashion branded products. This marked a long overdue turning point in the industry, one that had taken more than 35 years to get to, ever since the first British Vogue cover featuring Donyale Luna in 1966.

FASHION ‘GOT WOKE’ IN 2018 

As millennials and GenZers became important market cohorts, a more socially-conscious fashion industry began to emerge. Words like ‘transparency,’ ‘carbon-footprint’, ‘fair trade,’ ‘gender equality,’ ‘androgynous,’ and ‘gender-binary,’ as well as movements like “MeToo’ and “Time’s Up’, did much to change the conversation, especially between 2016 and 2018. We finally began to see the fashion industry’s positive response to diversity, inclusion and other issues.

Dolce & Gabbana 2018 (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Dolce & Gabbana 2018 (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

According to the The Fashion Spot, the fall 2018 fashion campaigns were the most diverse in terms of race with 35% of the models in the campaigns were non-white and it has been an upward trend since 2016. In addition, runway shows for Spring 2019 were the most racially diverse ever with 36% of all castings across New York, London, Milan and Paris went to models of color compared to 17% in 2015.

Diverse magazine covers 2018 (Courtesy: Pinterest)

Diverse magazine covers 2018 (Courtesy: Pinterest)

The 2018 September issues of fashion magazines, which are the most anticipated and that sell the most copies with the highest number of pages and advertisements, were also the most diverse ever. A total of 16 magazines brought their A game, featuring Afro descendants on their covers, something never before seen in the fashion industry.

Courtesy of the Cut (Yalitza Aparicio)

Courtesy of the Cut (Yalitza Aparicio)

And let’s not forget the spectacular cover of Vogue Mexico for January 2019, which featured Yalitza Aparicio, a Mixteco indigenous descendant actress from the movie Roma. It is the first time an indigenous descendant was featured in the magazine.

March 2017 Vogue’s “Diverse Cover” (Courtesy: Vogue)

March 2017 Vogue’s “Diverse Cover” (Courtesy: Vogue)

And although Vogue’s March 2017 ‘diverse cover’ was slammed for not being diverse enough, we saw a range of models that included Chinese model Lui Wen, American plus-sized model Ashley Graham, American model Kendall Jenner, American model Gigi Hadid (Dutch and Palestinian descent), Dutch model Imaan Hammam (of Egyptian and Moroccan descent), British model Adwoa Aboah (British and Ghanaian descent) and Italian model Vittoria Ceretti.

DIVERSITY IS MORE THAN COLOR

During the past few years, we have also learned that diversity is not only about color, it is also about body size, ethnicity, gender and age inclusivity and therefore the definition of what it means to be a ‘diverse’ model has changed. Since 2017, The Fashion Spot has included age, size, transgender to measure diversity on the runway.

Ashley Graham plus-size model (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Ashley Graham plus-size model (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

We have seen the popularity of plus size models increase. In 2016, Ashley Graham became the first plus-size model to appear on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and in January 2017, had her first British Vogue cover. Graham has been part of major fashion shows, from Dolce & Gabbana to Michael Kors and Christian Soriano, and has landed important jewelry campaigns, such as David Yurman Fall 2018.

73-year-old model Betty Catroux (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

73-year-old model Betty Catroux (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Age barriers were finally torn down in 2018, as models over the age of 50 were chosen for runway shows and advertising campaigns at luxury fashion houses. In fact, Saint Laurent announced 73-year-old Betty Catroux as the face of creative director Anthony Vaccarello’s Fall 2018 ad campaign. Eighteen women over the age of 50 starred in a total of 11 campaigns for Fall 2018, not including 44-year-old supermodel Amber Valletta, who, with seven campaigns to her name, was one of the season’s most-booked model.

Adut Akech (Courtesy:Pinterest)

Adut Akech (Courtesy:Pinterest)

And let’s not forget my favorite model of the year, Adut Akech, a South Sudan refugee, that since her debut in 2017 at Saint Laurent, has robbed the hearts of the most acclaimed fashion houses, including Chanel and Valentino, and is disrupting the meaning of beauty in fashion today. Diversity and inclusivity are definitely on the front row of fashion and are here to stay.

DIVERSITY BEHIND THE SCENES

I have always been interested in fashion, ever since I was 9 years old. As an Afro-Latino woman, I always wondered why models on the runway didn’t look like me. Curves and color were not exactly popular in the industry as I was growing up in the 1980s and 90s. So, you can imagine how exciting this moment in fashion is for me. However, I am still concerned about things that happen (or don’t) behind the scenes.

I started working in the fashion industry in 2005, and I can assure you that corporate positions at internationally acclaimed fashion houses are not very diverse. In 2017, Business of Fashion examined 15 of the largest public companies in fashion. They concluded that, “the vast majority (73 percent) are led by white male chief executives. On average, men and women of any ethnic minority represented only 11 percent of the board of directors at these companies.”

This is an extremely low statistic. Brands cannot adopt a language of inclusion and diversity in their marketing campaigns without extending this inclusivity to the boardroom and to the business branch of a company. According to a McKinsey & Company report entitled, “Delivering through Diversity”, companies with the most ethnically/culturally diverse boards are 43% more likely to deliver higher profits, because they are more likely to attract and retain talent, as well as improve customer service decisions.” So, why are fashion’s corporate offices not more on board with diversity when it benefits everyone? Hopefully, that will begin to change.

We not only need representation of ethnically diverse people at magazines, on runways, and in ad campaigns, we also need fashion managers of different cultures, color, size, age and gender. Choosing people who represent the world in which we currently live, and who understand, first hand, the needs of different types of consumers, has proven to be more profitable for those brands who have become more inclusive.

So, here’s my 2019 wish list for the fashion industry, in terms of diversity and inclusion:

1.     Appoint more designers with cultural and color diversity at major fashion houses, following the example of Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton, who perfectly understands emerging subcultures.

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton (Courtesy: BoF)

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton (Courtesy: BoF)

 

2.     More cosmetics and lingerie brands, such as Fenty, that are color and size inclusive and that think about the real customer.

Savage X Fenty (Courtesy: Getty Images)

Savage X Fenty (Courtesy: Getty Images)

 

3.     More influencers of ethnic diversity used for fashion brand campaigns that include a broader representation of the consumer market.

Influencers (Courtesy: BoF)

Influencers (Courtesy: BoF)

 

4.     More high-profile advocates like Beyoncé, who can help other minorities gain exposure in the fashion industry. Beyoncé created history by appointing the first black photographer, Tyler Mitchell, to shoot her 2018 September Vogue cover.

Courtesy of Instagram

Courtesy of Instagram

 

5.     More powerful Caucasian advocates who call out the lack of diversity in the fashion industry, such as Ellen Pompeo, with her Porter Magazine team.

(Courtesy: Porter Magazine)

(Courtesy: Porter Magazine)

 

6.     More important fashion magazine appointments, such as Edward Enninful, editor-in-chief of British Vogue, who has given the magazine a fresh and diverse viewpoint and who has transformed it into a more inclusive magazine that better represents the global audience it seeks to serve.

Edward Enninful – editor British Vogue (Courtesy: The Washington Post)

Edward Enninful – editor British Vogue (Courtesy: The Washington Post)

 

7.     And finally, more fashion companies that give opportunities to ethnic and culturally diverse managers who can bring a different perspective to the brand, to better serve the final consumer.

 

So, as we begin 2019, let’s hope that the fashion industry’s New Year’s Resolution will become the definition of the word ‘diversity’:  

Diversity: “the inclusion of different types of people (such as people of different races or cultures) in a group or organization.”

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And, another thing we are excited about at the University of Fashion is the launch of our new three-book beginner series on Draping, Sewing and Pattern making techniques which launches on January 8, 2019.

DRAPING                        https://www.amazon.com/Draping-Techniques-Beginners-University-Fashion/dp/1786271761?tag=univeoffash00-20

Draping (Courtesy Photo)

Draping (Courtesy Photo)

 

PATTERN MAKING             https://www.amazon.com/Pattern-Making-Techniques-Beginners-University/dp/1786271966?tag=univeoffash00-20

Pattern Making (Courtesy Photo)

Pattern Making (Courtesy Photo)

 

SEWING                            https://www.amazon.com/Sewing-Techniques-Beginners-University-Fashion/dp/1786271982?tag=univeoffash00-20

Sewing (Courtesy Photo)

Sewing (Courtesy Photo)

 

 

Bridal Fashion Show Round Up

Wedding Bells

Oscar de la Renta Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Oscar de la Renta Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Here comes the bride…..As bridal fashion shows wrapped up in New York City this week, one thing is for certain, brides have plenty of options for the Spring 2018 season. Trends ran the gamut from traditional, frothy confections to modern minimalist gowns and let’s not forget about pantsuits and jumpsuits. Here is a round-up of the five most influential shows of the bridal season.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

The most anticipated show of the bridal season was Oscar de la Renta, as Fernando Garcia and Laura Kim (the design duo behind the trendy label Monse) presented their first bridal collection for the house.  The duo lived up to the hype as they delivered a stellar collection. The designers showed traditional house pieces that the de la Renta customer craves such as romantic garden theme embroideries, case in point, a fern foliage motif as well as plenty of delicate floral frocks. For the non-traditional bride, there was a chic pantsuit and a Carrie Bradshaw moment with a denim jacket paired over a logo tulle confection with Oscar de la Renta’s signature, topped off  with a “Just Married” statement necklace. Overall the collection struck the perfect balance between the traditions of the house and an infused freshness that Garcia and Kim have injected.

 

Oscar de la Renta Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Oscar de la Renta Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

VERA WANG

Vera Wang knows a thing or two about wedding dresses. The designer is celebrating thirty years in the bridal business and this spring she is pushing her customer’s further. Inspired by her recent ready-to-wear collection, Wang is offering edgy and cool wedding dresses. The collection ranged from floaty bohemian frocks with a Gothic vibe to chic minimal gowns with architectural silhouettes. Vera Wang’s collection is for the fashion-forward bride.

Vera Wang Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Vera Wang Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

Vera Wang Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Vera Wang Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

CAROLINA HERRERA

Timeless beauty is in Carolina Herrera’s DNA and for her spring bridal collection she showcased her natural flare for elegance. Her signature bow appeared on a number of pieces ranging from a dramatic, over-sized shoulder bow to a simple ribbon bow on a lace column gown. Carolina Herrera also played with separates this season as she paired beaded knit top with a tulle ballskirt and a romantic blouse was worn with tuxedo trousers. Overall, Carolina Herrera’s collection was effortlessly romantic.

Carolina Herrera Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Carolina Herrera Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

Carolina Herrera Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Carolina Herrera Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

NAEEM KHAN

Naeem Khan is known for his glamorous, over-the-top eveningwear, and for his spring bridal show he did not disappoint. Naeem showed plenty of luxurious gowns from fanciful feathered confections to pastel floral embroideries – there were plenty of rich options for his global clientele. Naeem Khan’s dresses come with a hefty price-tag but these looks are perfect for the bride who flaunts has wealth.

Naeem Khan Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Naeem Khan Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

Naeem Khan Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Naeem Khan Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MONIQUE LHUILLER

Ethereal, fanciful, gowns is what Monique Lhuillier does best and for her spring bridal collection she delivered. The gowns struck a perfect balance between traditional and au currant. She showed plenty of delicate lace dresses, glamorous cascading ruffles and romantic layers of tulle. These are statement gowns that are timeless and forever.

 

Monique Lhuillier Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Monique Lhuillier Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Monique Lhuillier Bridal (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Monique Lhuillier Bridal
(Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

15 Best Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2017-18

- - Fashion Shows

Fashion weeks are the best places to uncover upcoming fashion trends and style inspiration. Some fashion weeks are more interesting than others. This was the case with Milan Fashion Week. Here are our 15 favorite looks and trends from the runway.

Fashion as Art

What began in Couture Fashion Week 2017 (see our blogpost from those shows) is continuing in Milan. Prada, featured fashion glamour girl prints splashed across this pared down silhouette and brought in another Couture Week trend – feathers. Here in the form of feathered ankle strap shoes.

prada-fw17-rtw

Prada (Image credits: Prada.com)

Fun Fashion

Milan Fashion Week would be incomplete without a buzz-worth Moschino collection. Jeremy Scott’s Rat-a-Porter collection didn’t disappoint and you just know that up there in fashion heaven, Franco Moschino was smiling. Inspired by trash and rats, the collection featured looks that literally made trash seem chic. Whether this look was a statement about recycling, or was created just for fun, it worked. It is always nice to see a less serious side of fashion.

_MOS0111_20170223231313

Moschino (Image Credits: Vogue.it)

Fashion With A Social Justice Message

Beginning in the 2000s, many designers began to use their runway shows as vehicles for social justice and to call attention to a particular cause. In 2015, Donatella Verace’s 2015 show donated to Equality Now, an NGO (non-government organization) dedicated to ending violence and discrimination against women and girls. And this season was no exception. Her feminine, flirtatious silhouettes in sheer georgette featured colourful floral embroidery, sequin embellishments and her message… ‘courage’ and ‘loyalty’.

Versace-fw17-

Versace (Image credits: Versace via ShilpaAhuja.com)

Peek-a-Boo Trend

Fendi reinvented sweater dressing with this peek-a-boo cut out oversized crochet sweater dress worn over a black bodysuit, paired with the hottest red patent leather over-the-knee boots and a red fur-strap bag.

fendi-fw17-rtw

Fendi (Image Credits: Fendi.com)

Redefining the Classics

Classic pant suits, sweaters, trousers, wool coats and pencil skirts were all seen during fashion week. Some were given a unique twist by designers both in the U.S and in London. In Milan, there was no exception. This look by MSGM, took an otherwise classic pinstripe suit and gave it a tweak, with a smattering of sequins and the now infamous ‘pussy bow’ blouse. A baseball cap and white ‘go-go’ boots completed the look.

msgm

MSGM (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

Another twist on a classic is this dramatic tweed jacket with an architectural assymetric collar seen on the runway at Salvatore Ferragamo. Designer Fulvio Rigoni, completed the look with a pair of cropped navy trousers.

salvatore-ferragamo

Salvatore Ferragamo (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

At Jil Sander, Lucie and Luke Maier served up a clever take on the classic and ubiquitous ‘puffer’ coat for this stylish over-sized copper metallic version, that works perfectly for either day or evening.

jil-sander

Jil Sander (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

Practical Fashion

While some designers tried to redefine the classics and others filled their collection with fun or social messages, other designers, like Max Mara stuck to practical, wearable fashion. Staying close to their roots of beige and a neutral color palette, creative director Ian Griffiths focused on wardrobe staples in mixed fabrics. Here, a beige sleeveless ribbed turtleneck sweater paired with a pale gold pencil skirt and pumps.

max mara

Max Mara (Image Credits: MaxMara.com)

Female Power

At heritage luxury label, Bottega Veneta, 15-year creative director veteran, Tomas Maier, gave his collection a nod to the shoulder pad! Strong shoulder, strong women, that is what this trend is all about. Here, his wool coat is belted, double-breasted and has a sharply defined shoulder.

bottega-veneta

Bottega Veneta (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

Themed Collections – Asian & Venetian Invasion

With China as a major inspiration for designers through the ages, at Gucci this season, Alessandro Michele created a cacophonous collection of rich brocades and laces. This look is juxtaposed with a stylized cowboy hat, a pair of white embroidered go-go boots and a parasol that adds to its overall eclectic exoticism.

gucci-fw17-rtw

Gucci (Image Credits: Gucci.com)

At Alberta Ferretti, Venice was the inspiration behind the collection. Here, the show’s final look was a red velvet cape worn over a red sheer gown – the makeup and filigree earrings gave a carnival feel.

alberta-ferretti

Alberta Ferretti (Image Credits: AlbertaFerretti.com)

Embellishments, Embellishments and More Embellishments

Dolce & Gabbana’s collection was, as always, rich with embellishments. This look is completely bongers. A sequined jacket with a patchwork of playing cards, paired with playful white graffitied jeans, topped off with a kitchy tiara and blue embellished pumps. Now is that not anti-minimal at its best and the antithesis of ‘less is more’, or what?

dolce-and-gabbana-fw17

Dolce & Gabbana (Image Credits: DolceGabbana.com)

At Marni, creative director Francesco Risso served up some embellishment with his iridescent coin-shaped sequins sewn onto this off the shoulder sheath dress.

marni22

Marni (Image Credits: Marni.com)

Armani goes New-Age

Who would have ever dreamed that Giorgio Armani, known for simple style made from the finest textiles money can buy, would ever show plastic clothing on the runway? Well he did just that at his Emporio Armani show. Here he showed a pair of laminated checkered pants and paired them with a fur ‘chubby’ jacket. Did you ever?

emporio armani

Emporio Armani (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

And Armani didn’t stop there. In his Giorgio Armani collection, he also played with mixed textures and materials. This look features a beaded top (or is it a necklace or a shrug?) with hassled details, paired with sumptuous velvet trousers and and a very pretty velvet bow-tie belt.

giorgio-armani

Giorgio Armani (Image Credits: Vogue.com)

It seems that Milan fashion had something for everyone: the art lover, fun seeker, classically-oriented, practical and new age fashionista, theme-lover and the growing cohort of socially responsible types. Stay tuned for more fashion week coverage and be sure to send us your thoughts on what you liked best and least from the collections!

Cozy Up to London Fashion Week Trends

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

Fashion week in London has wrapped up for another season. Much like many of the wrapped-up models that walked the runways, the trends veered toward cozy, roomy and bundled-up in yards of luxurious fabrics. From stripes to plaids to polka dots and neutrals to neons, London offered a little something for everybody for Fall 2017. Read More

Top 20 Looks from Fashion Weeks for Spring Summer 2017 Ready-to-Wear

- - Fashion Shows

The quickest way to understand the upcoming season’s trends is to take a look at the collections from the international fashion weeks – New York, London, Milan and Paris. The meccas of fashion – they set the mood for imminent style. The fashion weeks just ended, so it comes as no surprise that we pick out our top 20 favorite looks from fashion weeks for Spring Summer 2017 to mark the beginning of conversations about next season.

Some of the looks were about redefining everyday things. Let’s see two such looks by Alexander Wang and Versus Versace. The former look has pajama stripes and collar style to create an asymmetric wrap dress with a thigh-high slit. The dress is paired with white fringe sneakers, which the brand designed in collaboration with Adidas. The latter look is all about brazenness and shock. An orange bandeau top is designed like a belt, and paired with a matching jacket and pants.

Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang

Versus Versace

Versus Versace

This trend brings us to the topic of athleisure. This look from Mugler SS17 RTW collection gives a party dress the cut of a sports-bra, mixing the theme of 70s glamour with it.

mugler

Mugler

The other athleisure look is by Versace. An asymmetric skirt held together with a buckle is worn over an energetic mesh and ultra-lightweight nylon dress, paired with heel-socks.

versace-ss17-spring-summer-2017-collection-dress (48)-blue-full-sleeves-sheer-side-slit

Versace

Emporio Armani paired blue track-pants with a matching plunging-V-neck top, a red bag and earrings for a fun yet comfortable look.

Emporio Armani

Emporio Armani

Art was another theme we observed in the SS17 collections. In a dress by Alice+Olivia, a painting depicting Italian towns and landscape takes center-stage.

Alice + Olivia

Alice + Olivia

Another gorgeous dress is this one by Valentino. Inspired by Italian medieval art, the gown has sketchy painting all over its white and pale pink fabric.

valentino

Valentino

Rahul Mishra’s novel machine-washable hand-embroideries feature flora and fauna. The black cotton dress with patchwork birds on it, paired with a zipper jacket with three-dimensional floral applique on the shoulders.

rahulmishra

Rahul Mishra

Another look by Fendi pairs a floral patterned ruffle-neck bodysuit with a sheer organza skirt.

Fendi

Fendi

Some of the collections had specific themes. Moschino, for example, had models dressed as paper-dolls. In this unmissable look, a crop top with a bra-print is paired with a pencil skirt that has prints of logo-waistchains, complete with paper-doll-like hair and makeup, and folding tabs.

moschino

Moschino

Dior had a feminist message in its collection. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the fashion house’s new Artistic Director made headlines with the tee shirt that proclaimed “We should all be feminists” – one of Paris Fashion Week’s most talked-about looks.

Dior_RTW-SS2017_Look 18

Dior

Dolce & Gabbana took the theme of tropical Italy, focusing on Italian foods and music. This look is royal with a younger taste. An embellished black hoodie is paired with a tiara-like embellished headband and sheer knee-high socks.

dolce-and-gabbana-summer-2017-women-fashion-show-runway-16

Dolce & Gabbana

Gucci’s 18th century-inspired look with ostentatious earrings, large Colonial hat and a floral silk coat and a bag with a contrasting message – Future!

gucci

Gucci

On the other hand of the spectrum, Chanel, with its data-center themed show, catered to the millennial generation with its candy-colored coordinated set and matching baseball cap.

Chanel

Chanel

In this tropical forest themed look by Max Mara, a forest-like skirt with large leaf print is paired with a fuzzy sweater that has a large lemur-motif.

max-mara-ss17-collection-spring-summer-2017-dress (41)

Max Mara

Gowns and evening dresses came as pretty, shimmery and embellished as ever. Our top three include this one by Alexander McQueen – an unconventional gown with a wave of silver sequins rising up from sea-foam-like train, and going up to the neckline.

alexander mcqueen

Alexander McQueen

This Marchesa gown is similar, but more red-carpet-suitable. Silver sequins cover the top half of a tulle gown that creates an uneven artistic texture, leaving the bottom-half sheer.

marchesa

Marchesa

The third one is a Monique Lhuillier gown in mint-blue that comes with a rose-creeper embroidery on shoulders and sleeves.

monique-lhuillier

Monique Lhuillier

This Elie Saab mini-dress has a 70s theme to it, but presented with a modern taste –pockets and full-slashed sleeves rolling up into the belt.

elie saab

Elie Saab

This Zuhair Murad cocktail dress in petal-pink is urban-royal with every inch embellished and three-dimensional rose-shaped sleeves.

zuhair murad

Zuhair Murad

Image Credits: Versus Versace, Alice+Olivia, Rahul Mishra