University of Fashion Blog

Category "Trends"

High-Tech Future of Retail – Behind the Scenes

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The High-Tech Future of Retail is coming, and it may be closer than we think.   Customers are demanding improvements to the apparel experience, and the Retail industry is actively responding.  This blog highlights some of the research and development in process to bring the High-Tech Future of Retail to the everyday Retail customer.  This group of industry leaders and researchers are focusing on automating the experience of product selection and fit, for improved time to market, and product customization, particularly to regard to bespoke fit.

From Foot Scans to AI-Based Style Recommendations – Italy

The fashion industry is transitioning to Direct-to-Consumer and Product-as-Service models, thanks to the automation of product customization and associated personalization-for-style processes. This is known as mass customization in the US and in Europe as an industrial approach to retail Made-to-Order and its extreme option of made-to-measure.  An Italian company, ELSE-Corp, has expanded on this concept by incorporating Deep Learning and Small Data oriented versions of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for use in fashion design, retail and manufacturing.

Their Virtual Couture Fashion™, is a vision for a Real Time Fashion System bringing AI driven design, new technologies, an improved value chain, a completely new business model and novel manufacturing methods to the Fashion industry. It aims to accelerate the transformation of the industry towards a direct-to-consumer, customer-pull approach; enhancing the customer’s virtual shopping experience and optimizing the Virtual Retail value and service delivery chain using 3D and 2D computer aided design (CAD), teamed with AI.

The Big Data approach focuses on general business intelligence, with multi-channel analytics and real-time demand planning.

Permission granted by Andrey Golub, ELSE Corp

Permission granted by Andrey Golub, ELSE Corp

The Small Data approach focuses on personal (AI-driven) demand for optimized product design and retailing.

Permission granted by Andrey Golub, ELSE Corp

Permission granted by Andrey Golub, ELSE Corp

The Virtual Couture Fashion™ system provides accurate predictions of the style and size/ shape needs of individual customers, while forecasting product demand and improving supply chain planning and optimization.  Just-in-time on-demand manufacturing is made possible, and customer needs are met through either product customization or algorithms that search for products likely to fit based on customer characteristics.  Brands benefit from better customer satisfaction and better on-demand planning.  The environmental impact of the global fashion industry is improved through less wasteful practices related to excess inventory and customer returns.

How will customer needs and preferences impact retail in the future?

Links:

https://www.else-corp.com/

www.virtual-couture.org

Dreams of Retailer and Brands – Belgium/ The Netherlands

The dream of a Retailer: “Empower customer with their unique data, use our knowledge to get the data to her and in the end, she can shop seamlessly without any effort in any channel that she likes.”

Lien Van de Velde from Van de Velde Lingerie and Swimwear, on a PI Apparel’s Fashion Made podcast, explains the behind-the-scenes of development of an on-line try-on augmented reality tool or app. Expanding their company’s mission to improve the self-image of women through fashionable lingerie and fitting assistance to be in all channels, (in-store, on-line or mobile app). 

Utilizing their Summer 2018 Lingerie Collection, Van de Velde tested the app with core customers in their central Amsterdam store. They were surprised to learn that Millennials (age 18-25) still enjoyed interacting with a fitting expert in selecting proper fitting and fashionable bras. Customers judged this to be even more important than using an avatar that reflected the customer or the ability to share their choices with friends. Testing of the app began in Summer 2018 and still under development.

Permission granted from Lien Ven De Velde, Van de Velde Lingerie and Swimwear

Permission granted from Lien Ven De Velde, Van de Velde Lingerie and Swimwear

How to keep the brand’s strengths with the new technology?

Links:

https://www.vandevelde.eu/en

Brands – Marie Jo, PrimaDonna, Andres Sarda, sold in Rigby & Peller, Lincherie, and Private Shops

http://apparel.pi.tv/

Podcast: titled the “Virtually Trying On Lingerie”, Oct 30th, 2018

From Scans to Patterns – Canada

The Clone BlockTM, developed by Emma Scott of Fashion Should Empower (Vancouver Island, BC, Canada), offers to solve the problem of garment fit for body shape with a new method of translating body dimensions to a 2D pattern.  An inability to quantify body shape has hindered the automation of fit.  Scanning allows for a quick understanding of the customer’s body shape but without a method to quantify it, custom pattern shaping must rely on trial and error fittings to perfect fit.  Traditional methods of body shape assessment merely approximate shape (twin block).  The Clone BlockTM replicates the body in 2D thereby offering a mathematical representation and a new approach to garment fit assessment compatible with automated technologies. Where traditional garment fit assessment practices have previously relied on the comparison of 1D (tape measure) measurements, the Clone BlockTM offers a 2D assessment compatible with 3D technologies.

By permitting the comparison of the body shape inherent in the garment, to the body shape of a unique individual, sizing recommendations can more accurately be focused on pattern shaping and fit preference than sizing charts.  As quoted from Emma Scott’s paper presented at the 3D Body Tech 2018 conference, and shown in Figure 10 from the paper, “Body shape dictates the amount of hidden ease (affecting fit preference) available as it directly relates to shaping of the pattern during the design process.”

Permission granted by Emma Scott, Fashion Should Empower

Permission granted by Emma Scott, Fashion Should Empower

How do we make the Little Black Dress look good on every Body?

How will 3D body scanning impact pattern-making and understanding of garment ease?

Links:

https://fashionshouldempower.ca/

http://www.3dbody.tech/

From Scans to Patterns – UK

What do Aerospace engineering and pattern making have in common? At the University of Manchester, U.K., a collaborative project between the School of Materials and the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering developed the JBlock2D package – an automatic block-creation-geometry library. This library is the beginning of new open source software dedicated to the realization of a fully-automated custom-clothing production process.  The key is to create pattern blocks that accurately reflect the shape and proportion of customers.  The JBlock2D forms a platform for the analysis of pattern-to-person relationships coupled with body scanning.

Dr. Simeon Gill’s research (School of Materials) focuses on how patterns are related to the body and how this relationship drives the product.  His work will be facilitated by body scanning and analysis that allows for algorithm directed measurement, and thereby leads to a better understanding of body shape. Dr. Simeon Gill is convinced that pattern drafting can only really evolve in tandem with body scanning.

The current version of JBlock2D library includes 2D geometrical features that mimic the geometries used in traditional hand-created garment pattern blocks.  The library can be used to automate any pattern drafting method. The goal is to enable mass-market automation of custom apparel production and perhaps improve and ultimately standardize pattern drafting methods. There is a guide on YouTube showing how the JBlock2D software provides and interface to create dxf patterns drafted to an individual’s measurements directly from a SizeStream body scanner. It allows for direct creation of individual pattern blocks.

Body to Bodice

Permission granted by Simeon Gill, University of Manchester, UK

Permission granted by Simeon Gill, University of Manchester, UK

Scan to Pattern Bodice

Permission granted by Simeon Gill, University of Manchester, UK

Permission granted by Simeon Gill, University of Manchester, UK

Will 3D scanning cause the pattern drafting techniques to converge?

Links:

https://www.adriantheengineer.co.uk/single-post/JBlock2D2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5zsIK7ZCv4&t=6s

Definition of terms – Global

The High-Tech Future of Retail will also require new vocabulary and terms. The common terms of sloper versus block are sometimes used interchangeability.  However, as Rochelle New noted on the website Craftsy.com: “a sloper is a type of basic pattern that is used as the building block for all other patternmaking. Slopers are drafted based on specific body measurements and do not include a seam allowance, wearing ease, or any other design elements. They are simply a representation of a three-dimensional model in two-dimensional form.”

Clone BlockTM:  A Clone BlockTM is a mathematical representation of 3D body scanned data and translated to 2D, it replaces the traditional sloper or block with a block that mirrors body shape. While like other traditional blocks, in that it is base pattern from which other designs may be made, proprietary landmarks make the Clone BlockTM uniquely suited for technological platforms.  Unlike traditional garment blocks which use static unchanging darting and shaping, the Clone BlockTM is digitally marked for body shape parametrization with darting and shaping that adjust to match 3D body scanned data. Void of seam allowances, wearing ease and design elements, the Clone BlockTM can serve the purpose of a traditional block while also providing the foundation for mass garment customization.

JBlock2D: a JBlock2D is a type of basic pattern stored in a digital library that is used as a building block for all other patternmaking. A JBlock2D pattern is generated from body scans, thus allowing for improved understanding of body shape, as derived from body measurements extracted from the point cloud.  The JBlock2D library allows for seam allowance, wearing ease or any other pertinent design elements.

Sloper

Permission granted by Craftsy.com

Permission granted by Craftsy.com

Clone Block

Permission granted by Emma Scott, Fashion Should Empower

Permission granted by Emma Scott, Fashion Should Empower

Will 3D scanning create new definitions for very similar items that have manual or digital versions?

Links:

https://www.craftsy.com/sewing/article/making-a-sloper/

From Scans to Designs – UK

At Sheffield Hallam University, U.K., technology from the research centers are being used to enhance teaching and learning in fashion.  During the Semester 2 (Winter 2019), fashion design students will use 3D- imaging technology (developed by the Centre for Sports Engineering Research) to explore design in new ways. A video presentation, created with students, will demonstrate the potential of this collaboration.

Dr Alice Bullas, a researcher from Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre, Sport and Health Innovation, provided the details of the project.  As she explained in a project write-up “A member of the Centre for Sports Engineering Research Centre will teach members of the Fashion Design degree how to use a custom 3D scanning system (manufactured for the purpose of this project). Each student will have the opportunity to be scanned so that they are given a ‘virtual mannequin’ of themselves. A 3D likeness in a pose of their choice. The Fashion Design teaching team will work with the students and their virtual mannequins to explore designs, material choices and the way in which materials and designs interact over body shapes and forms. This will be done in an existing 3D design package.”

Towards the end of the project, a video will be produced which details: the technology that has been developed, the designs, creations and experiences of the students and the wider contexts for this technology. This video will be the core of a social media campaign which aims to showcase the project and what it produced. The intention is to repeat the project year on year.

Will designers understand body shape better with 3D scanning?

Links:

https://shu.ac.uk/research/specialisms/advanced-wellbeing-research-centre

Humming the Lyrics – US

As a WSJ article stated in “9 Movies That Can Teach Your Children About Business”, the movie Singing in the Rain reminds us that coping with change is a forever process. Strategies for learning how to work with new technologies are a lifelong skill.  Singing in the Rain shows how a movie studio made the transition from silent film to talkies.   The new technology referenced in that movie has now been around for over 100 years and is available even on your phone.  So, at the end of the day, when all the new technology gets overwhelming, just start humming the lyrics from a classic song….

Remember even old technologies were new, once upon a time.

Links:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/nine-movies-that-can-teach-your-children-about-business-1543201740

WHAT TO EXPECT IN FASHION 2019

Team Maison Martin Margiela (Courtesy:Edward Enninful Instagram)

Team Maison Martin Margiela (Courtesy:Edward Enninful Instagram)

Diversity and inclusion have not always been synonymous with the fashion industry, but in 2018 fashion finally “got woke.” Millennials and Gen Zers, the industry’s new generation of consumers, are much more politically active and brands are now realizing that to stay relevant, they need to take a stand on racism, gun control and socio-political issues. The age of ‘corporate neutrality’ is over.

Watchdogs like Diet Prada have become the fashion police, calling out brands for their missteps. With one million Instagram followers (and growing), the duo of Tony Liu and Lindsey Schuyler are a force to be reckoned with.

Nike’s decision to take a stand, using Colin Kaepernick in its 30th anniversary ad campaign, turned out to be a one of its smartest marketing moves yet. Gucci, who has been taking a stand on issues since 2013 with their ‘Chime for Change’ campaign (advocating for women’s rights and anti-poverty efforts), took on gun control in 2018 with a $500,000 donation to March for Our Lives, in support of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Other designers have supported gun control over the past few years too, including Kenneth Cole, Tom Ford, Christian Siriano and Zac Posen.

For those brands who are clinging to ‘neutrality’ for fear that they’ll alienate their customer base, we offer this information, because learning from past mistakes is one thing, but putting what is learned into practice is another. So, let’s reflect back and then take a peek into the future of where fashion has been and where it hopes to go (and grow).

LOOKING BACK TO MOVE FORWARD

Historically, fashion as an industry has primarily catered to a “rich, thin and white” demographic. Think Charles Frederick Worth (1856) and all of those lovely French aristocrats, and the birth of haute couture. It wasn’t until the Industrial Revolution, the invention of standardized sizing followed by the concept of ready-to-wear, that fashion’s demographic expanded. However, fashion marketing and advertising lagged behind in terms of diversity and inclusion, especially within fashion magazines, runway models, and even among fashion designers.

 DIVERSITY: IN MAGAZINES

 Donyale Luna, Beverly Johnson, Naomi Campbell (Courtesy: Pinterest)

Donyale Luna, Beverly Johnson, Naomi Campbell (Courtesy: Pinterest)

The first black woman to grace a fashion magazine cover was Donyale Luna, who appeared in British Vogue in March 1966, shot by photographer David Bailey. The iconic cover image showed Luna covering most of her face, which was allegedly a request of the magazine’s editors to help mask her ethnicity. At the time, it was not popular to put a colored woman in a high-level fashion brand, nor on a luxury fashion magazine cover. Donyanle Luna, an American, is known as the first black supermodel.

It took 8 more years for U.S. Vogue to feature a woman of color. In 1974, Beverly Johnson broke America’s glass ceiling with her Vogue cover photographed by Francesco Scavullo. Johnson’s blackness was not itself the subject of the cover. Instead, Vogue presented a vision of elegant beauty that was relatable, real, and totally about the times. But as Johnson said herself, it was not easy to get there due to her race.

It took 14 more years for French Vogue to feature a woman of color on their cover. In 1988 Naomi Campbell became the first colored woman in the magazine, even though she had been working with renowned designers. In fact, Yves Saint Laurent threatened to take away their magazine advertising in order to make this happen.

Gemma Ward & Du Juan (Courtesy: Pinterest)                    Fei Fei Sun (Courtesy: Vogue)

Gemma Ward & Du Juan (Courtesy: Pinterest) Fei Fei Sun (Courtesy: Vogue)

The lack of diversity in magazines was not exclusive to Afro descendants. The Asian community only got its first model cover in 2005, shot Patrick Demarchelier for French Vogue.  However, Chinese model Du Juan had to share the cover with Australian supermodel Gemma Ward. It would take another 8 years for an Asian model to get a solo cover, this time Fei Fei Sun for Italian Vogue in 2013.

These examples of models from diverse backgrounds were more often treated as tokens or novelties, rather than representing a real market demographic. Fashion brands didn’t see the need for including these and other diverse populations and therefore neglected a broader share of the market. By placing importance on ‘exclusiveness’, rather than realizing and embracing the idea of diversity and inclusion, brands actually missed a major opportunity for increased profitability.

DIVERSITY: ON THE RUNWAY

Eleanor Lambert’s Battle of Versailles 1973 fashion show

Eleanor Lambert’s Battle of Versailles 1973 fashion show

Diversity on the fashion runway was non-existent until 1973 when American publicist Eleanor Lambert introduced American fashion to Europe at the Palace of Versailles. Lambert was the first to use 12 black models in her fashion show. However ground-breaking that 1973 show was, several decades would pass with predominately white models walking the runway, featured in advertising campaigns and on magazine covers.

HOW GLOBALIZATION AFFECTED THE FASHION INDUSTRY

By 2008 things began to change in fashion as a result of globalization. An increase in international travel and intercultural exposure, a high volume of migration and mass movement of consumers, as well as the rapid growth of information and communication though social media platforms, were all catalysts for change. Society was evolving, and this was no better reflected than in the election of the first black U.S. president, Barack Obama, followed by the first woman chancellor elected in Germany, Angela Merkel. Increased visibility for the LGBTQ movement around the world, social responsibility and the sustainability movement all came together to awaken the world and the fashion industry.

 

(Courtesy:Vogue)

(Courtesy:Vogue)

In July 2008, U.S. Vogue published an article entitled, Is Fashion Racist? The article addressed the elephant in the room. It spoke to how fashion runway shows concentrated on a single homogeneous look, “the same procession of anonymous, blandly pretty, very young, very skinny, washed-out blondes with their hair scraped back.”  This acknowledgement, in such a highly regarded publication, forced the industry to rethink their strategy. The problem was not only a lack of diverse models on the runway, but also in magazines, in fashion campaigns and other related fashion branded products. This marked a long overdue turning point in the industry, one that had taken more than 35 years to get to, ever since the first British Vogue cover featuring Donyale Luna in 1966.

FASHION ‘GOT WOKE’ IN 2018 

As millennials and GenZers became important market cohorts, a more socially-conscious fashion industry began to emerge. Words like ‘transparency,’ ‘carbon-footprint’, ‘fair trade,’ ‘gender equality,’ ‘androgynous,’ and ‘gender-binary,’ as well as movements like “MeToo’ and “Time’s Up’, did much to change the conversation, especially between 2016 and 2018. We finally began to see the fashion industry’s positive response to diversity, inclusion and other issues.

Dolce & Gabbana 2018 (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Dolce & Gabbana 2018 (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

According to the The Fashion Spot, the fall 2018 fashion campaigns were the most diverse in terms of race with 35% of the models in the campaigns were non-white and it has been an upward trend since 2016. In addition, runway shows for Spring 2019 were the most racially diverse ever with 36% of all castings across New York, London, Milan and Paris went to models of color compared to 17% in 2015.

Diverse magazine covers 2018 (Courtesy: Pinterest)

Diverse magazine covers 2018 (Courtesy: Pinterest)

The 2018 September issues of fashion magazines, which are the most anticipated and that sell the most copies with the highest number of pages and advertisements, were also the most diverse ever. A total of 16 magazines brought their A game, featuring Afro descendants on their covers, something never before seen in the fashion industry.

Courtesy of the Cut (Yalitza Aparicio)

Courtesy of the Cut (Yalitza Aparicio)

And let’s not forget the spectacular cover of Vogue Mexico for January 2019, which featured Yalitza Aparicio, a Mixteco indigenous descendant actress from the movie Roma. It is the first time an indigenous descendant was featured in the magazine.

March 2017 Vogue’s “Diverse Cover” (Courtesy: Vogue)

March 2017 Vogue’s “Diverse Cover” (Courtesy: Vogue)

And although Vogue’s March 2017 ‘diverse cover’ was slammed for not being diverse enough, we saw a range of models that included Chinese model Lui Wen, American plus-sized model Ashley Graham, American model Kendall Jenner, American model Gigi Hadid (Dutch and Palestinian descent), Dutch model Imaan Hammam (of Egyptian and Moroccan descent), British model Adwoa Aboah (British and Ghanaian descent) and Italian model Vittoria Ceretti.

DIVERSITY IS MORE THAN COLOR

During the past few years, we have also learned that diversity is not only about color, it is also about body size, ethnicity, gender and age inclusivity and therefore the definition of what it means to be a ‘diverse’ model has changed. Since 2017, The Fashion Spot has included age, size, transgender to measure diversity on the runway.

Ashley Graham plus-size model (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Ashley Graham plus-size model (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

We have seen the popularity of plus size models increase. In 2016, Ashley Graham became the first plus-size model to appear on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and in January 2017, had her first British Vogue cover. Graham has been part of major fashion shows, from Dolce & Gabbana to Michael Kors and Christian Soriano, and has landed important jewelry campaigns, such as David Yurman Fall 2018.

73-year-old model Betty Catroux (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

73-year-old model Betty Catroux (Courtesy: The Fashion Spot)

Age barriers were finally torn down in 2018, as models over the age of 50 were chosen for runway shows and advertising campaigns at luxury fashion houses. In fact, Saint Laurent announced 73-year-old Betty Catroux as the face of creative director Anthony Vaccarello’s Fall 2018 ad campaign. Eighteen women over the age of 50 starred in a total of 11 campaigns for Fall 2018, not including 44-year-old supermodel Amber Valletta, who, with seven campaigns to her name, was one of the season’s most-booked model.

Adut Akech (Courtesy:Pinterest)

Adut Akech (Courtesy:Pinterest)

And let’s not forget my favorite model of the year, Adut Akech, a South Sudan refugee, that since her debut in 2017 at Saint Laurent, has robbed the hearts of the most acclaimed fashion houses, including Chanel and Valentino, and is disrupting the meaning of beauty in fashion today. Diversity and inclusivity are definitely on the front row of fashion and are here to stay.

DIVERSITY BEHIND THE SCENES

I have always been interested in fashion, ever since I was 9 years old. As an Afro-Latino woman, I always wondered why models on the runway didn’t look like me. Curves and color were not exactly popular in the industry as I was growing up in the 1980s and 90s. So, you can imagine how exciting this moment in fashion is for me. However, I am still concerned about things that happen (or don’t) behind the scenes.

I started working in the fashion industry in 2005, and I can assure you that corporate positions at internationally acclaimed fashion houses are not very diverse. In 2017, Business of Fashion examined 15 of the largest public companies in fashion. They concluded that, “the vast majority (73 percent) are led by white male chief executives. On average, men and women of any ethnic minority represented only 11 percent of the board of directors at these companies.”

This is an extremely low statistic. Brands cannot adopt a language of inclusion and diversity in their marketing campaigns without extending this inclusivity to the boardroom and to the business branch of a company. According to a McKinsey & Company report entitled, “Delivering through Diversity”, companies with the most ethnically/culturally diverse boards are 43% more likely to deliver higher profits, because they are more likely to attract and retain talent, as well as improve customer service decisions.” So, why are fashion’s corporate offices not more on board with diversity when it benefits everyone? Hopefully, that will begin to change.

We not only need representation of ethnically diverse people at magazines, on runways, and in ad campaigns, we also need fashion managers of different cultures, color, size, age and gender. Choosing people who represent the world in which we currently live, and who understand, first hand, the needs of different types of consumers, has proven to be more profitable for those brands who have become more inclusive.

So, here’s my 2019 wish list for the fashion industry, in terms of diversity and inclusion:

1.     Appoint more designers with cultural and color diversity at major fashion houses, following the example of Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton, who perfectly understands emerging subcultures.

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton (Courtesy: BoF)

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton (Courtesy: BoF)

 

2.     More cosmetics and lingerie brands, such as Fenty, that are color and size inclusive and that think about the real customer.

Savage X Fenty (Courtesy: Getty Images)

Savage X Fenty (Courtesy: Getty Images)

 

3.     More influencers of ethnic diversity used for fashion brand campaigns that include a broader representation of the consumer market.

Influencers (Courtesy: BoF)

Influencers (Courtesy: BoF)

 

4.     More high-profile advocates like Beyoncé, who can help other minorities gain exposure in the fashion industry. Beyoncé created history by appointing the first black photographer, Tyler Mitchell, to shoot her 2018 September Vogue cover.

Courtesy of Instagram

Courtesy of Instagram

 

5.     More powerful Caucasian advocates who call out the lack of diversity in the fashion industry, such as Ellen Pompeo, with her Porter Magazine team.

(Courtesy: Porter Magazine)

(Courtesy: Porter Magazine)

 

6.     More important fashion magazine appointments, such as Edward Enninful, editor-in-chief of British Vogue, who has given the magazine a fresh and diverse viewpoint and who has transformed it into a more inclusive magazine that better represents the global audience it seeks to serve.

Edward Enninful – editor British Vogue (Courtesy: The Washington Post)

Edward Enninful – editor British Vogue (Courtesy: The Washington Post)

 

7.     And finally, more fashion companies that give opportunities to ethnic and culturally diverse managers who can bring a different perspective to the brand, to better serve the final consumer.

 

So, as we begin 2019, let’s hope that the fashion industry’s New Year’s Resolution will become the definition of the word ‘diversity’:  

Diversity: “the inclusion of different types of people (such as people of different races or cultures) in a group or organization.”

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And, another thing we are excited about at the University of Fashion is the launch of our new three-book beginner series on Draping, Sewing and Pattern making techniques which launches on January 8, 2019.

DRAPING                        https://www.amazon.com/Draping-Techniques-Beginners-University-Fashion/dp/1786271761?tag=univeoffash00-20

Draping (Courtesy Photo)

Draping (Courtesy Photo)

 

PATTERN MAKING             https://www.amazon.com/Pattern-Making-Techniques-Beginners-University/dp/1786271966?tag=univeoffash00-20

Pattern Making (Courtesy Photo)

Pattern Making (Courtesy Photo)

 

SEWING                            https://www.amazon.com/Sewing-Techniques-Beginners-University-Fashion/dp/1786271982?tag=univeoffash00-20

Sewing (Courtesy Photo)

Sewing (Courtesy Photo)

 

 

Spring’s Most Surprising Hot Trend: The Bike Short

- - Trends

Left to right: Nina Ricci and Dion Lee spring 2018 looks (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Left to right: Nina Ricci and Dion Lee’s spring 2018 looks (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

“Ugly-pretty” fashion trends have been making a mark on the runway over the past few seasons, from Balenciaga’s platform Crocs to Miu Miu’s socks with sandals look. Another surprising trend of the spring season was the return of the spandex bike short, and we’re not talking for cycling.

From New York to Paris the bike short took center stage and somehow it looked new again, especially when paired with a tailored jacket, a chunky sweater or… are you ready… for eveningwear!

 

Dolce & Gabbana spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana’s spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

This trend has already been spotted on models, celebrities and influencers, who have been pairing their bike shorts with mini-skirts and stilettos. Celebrity stylist Elizabeth Sulcer told Vogue, “bike shorts are flattering because they show off your legs in a different, more discreetly sexy way, and they look great with heels.”

Saint Laurent spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Saint Laurent’s spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

But at UoF, we think the trend has more to do with the industry’s fascination with streetwear, youth culture and ‘looking fit’ (even if you haven’t hit the gym in years)! Just look at the buzz surrounding labels like Supreme and Off White and streetwear newcomers:  LA-based brand BornxRaised, the Japanese brand Doublet, Metropolitan US, MISBHV and Supreme’s ex-Creative Director Brendon Barbenzien’s brand, NOAH. They sell ‘cool’. And who doesn’t want to look cool?

Either way, it’s the latest trend and we’re predicting that it will make its way to the mainstream fashion-loving consumer by the summer. And oh, let’s face it, in our sustainability-conscious world, some of us still have our 80s bike shorts in our closet! What a great way to give them a face lift?

Fenty X Puma spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fenty X Puma’s spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Here are some bike short pairings from MSGM, Nina Ricci and Saint Laurent worn under oversized jackets, dresses, and skirts, which definitely added an extra layer of interest.

MSGM spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM’s spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Virgil Abloh, the creative director for Off-White, was inspired by Princess Diana’s daily trips to the gym, and interpreted some of her most iconic looks for his spring 2018 collection, most notably, her biker shorts.  So, how did Abloh interpret Diana’s biker short look? Well, it was the show’s finale. Supermodel Naomi Campbell (who once participated in a prank orchestrated by Diana) brought down the house in a pair of white bike shorts under a white double-breasted blazer. Could this look qualify as a runway wedding outfit finale, 21st century style?

 

Princess Diana in biker shorts (Photo courtesy of wellandgood.com)

Princess Diana in biker shorts (Photo courtesy of wellandgood.com)

 

 

Off-White spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Off-White’s spring 2018 look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

So tell us, will you give the biker short a test run this summer? Send us pics of your own bike short pairing!

Stars Shine and Show Some Skin in Cannes

Screen Shot 2018-05-13 at 8.25.55 PM

Photo courtesy of www.standard.co.uk

Last Tuesday marked the start of the 71st Cannes Film Festival which runs through May 18, 2018. The beauty of reviewing fashion at this annual gathering of who’s who in film is that celebrities and attendees are not only wearing red carpet looks for film screenings and events, but also a chic variety of daytime head-to-toe looks for panels, photoshoots, promotional events and interviews.

No matter the time of day, three top trends are emerging as the stars promote their latest works. Read More

The Fashion Circus Begins: Men’s Fall 2018 Collections Kick Off

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

 

Loewe Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

Loewe Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

The New Year has just begun and the fashion show hamster wheel is spinning faster than ever.  The Men’s Fall/Winter 2018 season kicked off in London where a number of New York editors missed the shows due to blizzard conditions. Then in was off to Florence for Pitti Uomo, a chic affair showcasing some of the most dandy and chicest menswear collections in Europe; meanwhile, Milan offered plenty of bold, cutting edge trends. Although both London and Milan have shortened their show schedules, there was still plenty of great fashion to see, including all the co-ed shows, which just may become runway’s future.

Paris is winding down, but the biggest news out of the fashion capital was the announcement that Kim Jones, the Men’s Artistic Director for Louis Vuitton since 2011, is leaving the company. Jones presented his final show for Louis Vuitton on Thursday and received a standing ovation as he walked side by side with supermodels Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss. Now that’s making an exit!

But now the guessing game begins, who will replace Jones and where will Jones end up next?

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Although the season is still going strong, here are a few key menswear trends so far:

LOGOMANIA

Logo’s are back and better than ever. The logo craze was first reserved for accessories, but today, companies are branding their names on everything from intarsia knits to fur coats (hello Fendi).

Fendi Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iceberg Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Iceberg Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

UTALITARIAN

It’s a throwback to the nineties, as utilitarian inspired looks ruled the runways from London to Paris.

Rick Owens Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Rick Owens Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Belstaff Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Belstaff Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Craig Green Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Craig Green Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

TAILOR MADE

Suit-Up. Sharp, tailored suits made their mark on the runway as the classic looks take a modern turn, complete with ties and all.

Giorgio Armani Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Giorgio Armani Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

GOOD SPORT

The athleisure trend is still going strong as streetwear inspired looks continue to take center stage.

Off-White Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Off-White Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Stella McCartney Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

Stella McCartney Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

 

FIT TO PRINT

Designers are playing mix-and-match this season as head to toe prints are making a splash.

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Missoni Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Missoni Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Vivienne Westwood Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Vivienne Westwood Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Pringle of Scotland Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

Pringle of Scotland Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

 

BRAVE THE COLD

Terrific outerwear was all over the runway, but one of the key outerwear trends were shearling jackets that were effortless yet cozy.

Brunello Cucinelli Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Brunello Cucinelli Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Dsquared2 Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dsquared2 Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Tods Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Tods Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Band of Outsiders Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

Band of Outsiders Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

 

 TELL US, WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MENSWEAR TREND THIS SEASON?

75th Annual Golden Globes – More Than Just Another Award Show

- - Trends
America Ferrera in custom Christian Siriano, Natalie Portman in Dior Haute Couture, Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

America Ferrera in custom Christian Siriano, Natalie Portman in Dior Haute Couture, Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

Hollywood A-listers have long used their fame to promote individual causes, whether political, ethnic or humanitarian. But at this year’s 75th Annual Golden Globes, most all of the attending actors and actresses stood unified in a sea of black (or wore Time’s Up pins). Dressing in black resulted in a powerful solidarity statement, lending support to the ” Time’s Up”  and “Me To” movements and those who so courageously continue to speak out against sexual harassment and female inequality. The  days of watching award shows solely for the fashion are démodé, or are they?  Clothes at award shows are now more important than ever!  Oprah Winfrey’s Cecil B. DeMille AwardAward speech said it all : “a new day is on the horizon!”

From left Reese Witherspoon, Eva Longoria, Salma Hayek and Ashley Judd arrive at the awards

Side by side with Hollywood heavyweights stood female activists such as Monica Ramirez, a campaigner who fights sexual violence against farmworkers and Billie Jean King, the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association, whom Emma Stone portrays in Battle of the Sexes.

Oprah Winfrey  giving her Cecil B DeMille Award

Oprah Winfrey giving her Cecil B DeMille Award speech

While many celebrities dazzled on the stage, the red carpet was filled with fashion drama. Here are some of the biggest trends of the night: (All photos courtesy of Shutterstock).

THE NEW SUIT

Gal Gadot  in Tom Ford

Gal Gadot in Tom Ford

Maggie Gyllenhaal in Monse

Maggie Gyllenhaal in Monse

Alexis Bledel in Oscar de la Renta

Alexis Bledel in Oscar de la Renta

Allison Brie in Vassilis Zoulias

Allison Brie in Vassilis Zoulias

 

 BOWS

Margot Robbie in Gucci

Margot Robbie in Gucci

 

Tracee Ellis Ross in Marc Jacobs

Tracee Ellis Ross in Marc Jacobs

Emilia Clarke in Miu Miu

Emilia Clarke in Miu Miu

 

MIDAS TOUCH

Dakota Johnson in Gucci

Dakota Johnson in Gucci

 

Saoirse Ronan in Atelier Versace

Saoirse Ronan in Atelier Versace
Mary J. Blige in Custom Alberta Ferretti

Mary J. Blige in custom Alberta Ferretti

Kelly Clarkson in Christian Siriano

Kelly Clarkson in Christian Siriano

 

COVERED UP

Elisabeth Moss in Dior Haute Couture

Elisabeth Moss in Dior Haute Couture

Salma Hayek in Balenciaga

Salma Hayek in Balenciaga

Angelina Jolie in Atelier Versace

Angelina Jolie in Atelier Versace

 

Isabelle Huppert in Chloé

Isabelle Huppert in Chloé

 

PLUNGING NECKLINES

Issa Rae in Prabal Gurung

Issa Rae in Prabal Gurung

Kate Hudson in Valentino Haute Couture

Kate Hudson in Valentino Haute Couture

 

Golden Globes 2018: Every Look on the Red Carpet

COLD SHOULDER

Reese Witherspoon in Zac Posen at the Golden-Globes-2018

Reese Witherspoon in Zac Posen at the Golden-Globes-2018

Tarana Burke and Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton

Tarana Burke and Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton

Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton andBillie Jean King

Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

 

Meryl Streep in custom Vera Wang and Ai Jen Poo

Meryl Streep in custom Vera Wang and Ai Jen Poo

Greta Gerwig in Oscar de la Renta

Greta Gerwig in Oscar de la Renta

 

SHORT

Millie Bobby Brown in Calvin Klein by Appointment and Repossi jewelry

Millie Bobby Brown in Calvin Klein by Appointment and Repossi jewelry

Kendall Jenner in Giambattista Valli Haute Couture

Kendall Jenner in Giambattista Valli Haute Couture

Halle Berry in Zuhair Murad

Halle Berry in Zuhair Murad

Heidi Klum in Ashi Studio

Heidi Klum in Ashi Studio

 

NOT YOUR BASIC TUXEDO

Noah Schnapp in Balmain

Noah Schnapp in Balmain

Golden Globes 2018: Every Look on the Red Carpet

James Franco in Salvatore Ferragamo and Dave Franco in Saint Laurent

James Franco in Salvatore Ferragamo and Dave Franco in Saint Laurent

Nick Jones in Versace

Nick Jonas in Versace

 

Winners of the night included:

MOVIES

Best motion picture, drama: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy: “Lady Bird”

Best actress in a motion picture, drama: Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best actor in a motion picture, drama: Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Best actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy: James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”

Best actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy: Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

Best supporting actor, any motion picture: Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best supporting actress, any motion picture: Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

Best director: Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”

Best screenplay: Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

TELEVISION

Best television series, drama: “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best television series, musical or comedy: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Best limited series or motion picture made for television:”Big Little Lies”

Best actress in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”

Best actor in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Ewan McGregor, “Fargo”

Best actress in a television series, drama: Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best actor in a television series, drama: Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”

Best actress in a television series, musical or comedy: Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Best actor in a television series, musical or comedy: Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

Best supporting actor in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Alexander Skarsgård, “Big Little Lies”

Best supporting actress in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Laura Dern, “Big Little Lies”

TELL US, WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE LOOK OF THE NIGHT? AND, SHOULD OPRAH RUN FOR PRESIDENT?

Halloween Inspired Looks Right Off The Runway

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

In Need of a Costume……..

Thom Browne Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Thom Browne Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

We look to Fashion Week for the latest trends and style inspirations, as well as celebrity sightings, street-style stars, and drop-dead gorgeous models, but at times, runway looks can be a great source of originality for Halloween costumes. Forget the creepy, zombie  motifs. The spring/summer 2018 collections offer more feminine and sexy variations to play dress up in. Themes ranged from Disney princess’ to Andy Warhol pop art prints.  So take a look below, and see the most creative styles that’ll have you covered when it comes to costume originality and give you major high-fashion cred.

Prada Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Swan Lake

Every little girl dreams of being a ballerina and for spring, Thom Browne created an alternate universe at the Hôtel de Ville with magic wands and pouches full of glittery fairy dust. The possibility of magic and mischief filled the air. This whimsical show was an ode to childhood fantasies – think mermaids, unicorns and ballerinas. Browne’s vision of a ballerina was am encrusted pearl studded bodysuit as they danced down the runway, now that’s what you’d call a fairy-tale beginning.

Meanwhile, Jeremy Scott was also inspired by the ballet, but his version was a tougher girl, for his Moschino show – think biker ballerina. Scott showed a variety of leather jackets, satin bustiers, tulle tutus, and fishnets in a couple dozen variations on the runway.

Thom Browne Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Thom Browne Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Moschino Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Moschino Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fairy-Tale

Fairy Tales do come true – and no one was able to capture the joy of fairytales and princesses better then Walt Disney. For spring, Philipp Plein’s theme was “Good Gone Bad.” His recurrent logo was a ball-gagged and bonded Alice in Wonderland character (or was it Cinderella?). Plein anlo showed a handful of T-shirts that read “Plein Fairytale Crew”. Was it a fairy tale? No. But wouldn’t it make a great costume?

Meanwhile, Alessandro Michele showed an intense, contradictory, and literally dark experience, for his spring 2018 Gucci show. It was full of glitter and glam, ’80s shoulders, English tweeds, Disney and Sega references, with all his recognizable eclectic mix of reworked vintage chic. Who wouldn’t love a Snow White sequin sweatshirt?

 

Philipp Plein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Philipp Plein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gucci Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gucci Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gucci Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gucci Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

 Pop-Art

The fashion and art world go hand in hand as many designers look to artists for inspiration. For Spring, both Raf Simons for Calvin Klein and Donatella Versace where influenced by the works of Andy Warhol and his iconic Pop-Art prints. For Raf Simons’s Calvin Klein, he experimented with American classics but in a subversive way. His new motifs for spring included Andy Warhol prints of Dennis Hopper circa Easy Rider and a 1971 Sandra Brant (is there an art movement more American than Pop?), cheerleaders, and horror movies.

Meanwhile, Donatella Versace gave a tribute to her brother Gianni,  founder of the Versace label, as the 20 year anniversary of his murder just past. It was a tribute celebrating Gianni’s inspirations and creations, and  “a genius . . . an icon . . . my brother” stated Donatella Versace.  She wanted the focus to be on his life, not his violent end, but also his feminist leanings and the eternal relevance of his designs. So of course, among the medusa and baroque motifs, there were plenty of Andy Warhol prints.

Miuccia Prada was also inspired by pop art, but of the comic book variety. Prada presented an empowering show, set among the work of women cartoonists and manga artists whose drawings dominated the company’s huge headquarters. The collection was based on putting her stamp on a blank canvas. Coats, jackets, and cropped pants were screen-printed in the various artists’ works. The result was a strong and feisty collection, with a nod to the early 80’s clubkid; but all with Prada’s sophisticated and chic hand.

Versace Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Calvin Klein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Calvin Klein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Calvin Klein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Calvin Klein Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Groovy

One of the easiest Halloween costume trends to pull off are the Sixties, think peace, love and happiness. Think Woodstock. And no-one does it better than Anna Sui. She laser-cuts through the past, pulling references together for a beautiful collage that is at once nostalgic, modern, and a bit kooky.

Marc Jacobs showed a happy and upbeat spring collection with giant daisies and other overscale flowers; the collection was filled with Crayola colors, tinsel trimmings, and sequins, sequins, sequins. Jacobs’s idea here was to return to the archives, passing old ideas and former hits through “exaggerated, decadent, and exotic” filters. This is hippy chic in the most lux sense.

Stacey Bendet, the quirky designer behind the Alice + Olivia label, also gave a nod to the sixties with a re-imagined version of the hippy-chic with floral peasant dresses and bohemian inspired tops with bell-bottom denim.

Anna Sui Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Anna Sui Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Alice + Olivia Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Alice + Olivia)

Alice + Olivia Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Alice + Olivia)

 

 

Marc Jacobs Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Marc Jacobs Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dynasty

With the remake of the 80’s television series Dynasty, Eighties inspired costumes will be a sure fire hit. Anthony Vaccarello, the young designer behind Saint Laurent had plenty of dresses to choose from – from ostrich feather knee high boots to bubble hem dresses. Vaccarello’s collection was bold and cohesive, a real tribute to the founder Yves Saint Laurent. The show, held under the Eiffel Tower, was a bright and brilliant shot of sexuality, provocation, and the promise of all kinds of fun for a new generation. It was the Eighties in the most fabulous way.

Meanwhile, Waight Keller debut her first collection under the Givenchy label. Keller looked back and was inspired by the founder of the house, Hubert de Givenchy. She looked to his dynamic sketches, and zeroed in on how he started everything with the ‘shoulder;’ also, that he was a fan of graphic prints. So naturally, her runway looks were filled with strong shoulder looks, graphic prints and bold colors – just perfect for an Eighties revival costume theme party.

 

Saint Laurent Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Saint Laurent Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Givenchy Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Givenchy Spring 2018 Show (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

So with all these easy to interpret runway looks, what will you be this Halloween?

Breaking Traditions: Fall 2018 Bridal Round Up

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

Bridal Fall 2018 

Vera Wang Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Vera Wang)

Vera Wang Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Vera Wang)

Here comes the bride….. and she wore anything but your traditional, classic wedding gown.  Bridal Fashion Week just ended in New York City and there were plenty of show-stopping looks that will set brides apart from the cookie-cutter world of Wedding gowns.

AND THE BRIDE WORE……..

Who said you have to wear a dress on your wedding day. For fall, designers are offering chic jumpsuits, cropped tops, tailored jackets and slim trousers for a modern take on bridal. Take for example Sachin and Babi Ahluwalia, the husband and wife duo of the label Sachin & Babi, this season, they reinterpreted a few of their ready-to-wear styles as bridal. Case in point, a jacquard bomber jacket paired with a sequin wide-leg trouser. This investment would be worth wearing more than once. Here are some great separates options.

Sachin & Babi  Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Sachin & Babi)

Sachin & Babi Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Sachin & Babi)

Lela rose

Lela Rose Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Lela Rose)

Lela Rose Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Lela Rose)

Monique Lhuillier Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of VMonique Lhuillier)

Monique Lhuillier Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of VMonique Lhuillier)

 

TAKE A BOW

Bows have become a signature theme for avant-gard designers Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren, the feminine motif can be found on everything from their perfume bottles to their couture collection and especially their bridal collection.  Viktor & Rolf Mariage was filled with oversized exaggerated bows from a whimsical giant cascading bow gown to a chic jumpsuit topped with a sculptural bow at the bust. Here are some other great bow options.

Viktor & Rolf Mariage Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Viktor & Rolf)

Viktor & Rolf Mariage Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Viktor & Rolf)

Tadashi Shoji Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Tadashi Shogi)

Tadashi Shoji Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Tadashi Shogi)

Inbal Dror Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Inbal Dror)

Inbal Dror Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Inbal Dror)

 

NAUGHTY OR NICE

Sexy, lingerie-inspired looks are making a comeback in bridal and Vera Wang offered the sultry theme in the coolest way possible. In this collection, Wang pushed the envelope with grand yet easy silhouettes – playing with volume, lace and embroidery.  Wang offers a loosened corset reminiscent of last season’s Romeo and Juliet–inspired gowns, and the garter belts were a nod to Wang’s new Spring ’18 ready-to-wear lineup, while her signature sheer dresses were modern and fresh. Here are some more lingerie inspired gowns.

Vera Wang Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Vera Wang)

Vera Wang Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Vera Wang)

Naeem Khan Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Naeem Khan)

Naeem Khan Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Naeem Khan)

 

 CAPE TOWN

No bride wants to cover up her wedding dress, but for fall, designers are offering beautiful and dramatic capes to keep brides looking elegant and oh so chic. These capes are just as special and ornate as the gowns themselves. Take for example Zuhair Murad, his shoulder-grazing capes and detachable skirts defined his collection. Murad is offering brides the flexibility of changing up their look from ceremony to reception; they also helped Murad’s gowns stand out from the  pack this week, as he showed the most showstopping dresses of the season.

Zuhair Murad Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Zuhair Murad)

Zuhair Murad Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Zuhair Murad)

Naeem Khan Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Naeem Khan)

Naeem Khan Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Naeem Khan)

Marchesa Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Martchesa)

Marchesa Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Martchesa)

FIT FOR A QUEEN

Sure there are many unconventional wedding dress choices, but there are also a number of designers who created whimsical gowns with a regal twist. These dresses will transform any bride into a modern day princess. Most noteworthy was Elie Saab’s fall 2018 bridal collection where he revisited classic silhouettes with a few modern twists. The gowns possessed his signature couture craftsmanship with intricately embellished dresses, veils, and metallic threads, for subtle shimmer. An arabesque motif was woven throughout, most notably, on a silver beaded collar floating above the décolletage.  Here are some more regal gowns.

Elie Saab Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Elie Saab)

Elie Saab Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Elie Saab)

Reem Acra Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Reem Acra)

Reem Acra Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Reem Acra)

Viktor & Rolf Mariage Fall 2018  Bridal (Photo courtesy of Viktor & Rolf)

Viktor & Rolf Mariage Fall 2018 Bridal (Photo courtesy of Viktor & Rolf)

Tell us which of the wedding looks would you choose if you were getting married, and of course, money was no object?

Paris Fashion Week: From Glam and Glitz to Avant-Garde

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

PARIS FASHION WEEK

Saint Laurent Runway : The Eiffel Tower  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Saint Laurent Runway : The Eiffel Tower (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

 

The spring 2018 fashion shows have been a long haul, but there were so many inspiring moments from Ralph Lauren’s show in his exotic car garage in Bedford, N.Y. to Donatella Versace’s tribute to Gianni; who can ever forget the images all over Instagram with his supermodels (Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer, Helena Christensen and Carla Bruni) all on stage in golden gowns – it was an emotional moment for many in the industry. Now we reach the final stretch, Paris, the fashion capital of the world. Paris shows are not over yet, but here are some of the highlights of the week so far, from political messages to over-the-top glamour.

EMPOWERING WOMEN

It’s clear that Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first female Creative Director for Christian Dior, is using the label as a platform to empower women. Who can forget her “We Should All Be Feminists” t-shirts. Every Instagram and street style star wore them. For spring, Chiuri uses the runway to let us ponder another thought “Why Have There Been No Great Woman Artists?” This question was emblazoned on a striped marinière sweater. The question is the title of art historian Linda Nochlin’s 1971 essay that explores the topic of feminist art history; historically, woman have had a difficult time achieving success in the arts. Chiuri’s Dior is a new Dior. Gone are the pastel colored, ladies-who-lunch suits. It’s clear that Chiuri is focusing on the millennials with looks that ranged from 70’s patchwork jeans to leather jumpsuits. For evening, she showed an assortment of sheer, sparkly, glitter mini dresses in every color under the rainbow – all complete with low block heeled mesh knee high boots. It’s refreshing to see a designer put out a positive message that she really does believe in.

Christian Dior  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Christian Dior (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

THE NEW CHLOE-GIRL

There’s a new Chloe Girl in town…..Natacha Ramsay-Levi just presented her first collectionas the creative director for Chloé  to rave reviews. Although this is her first moment in the spotlight, Ramsay-Levi is well-known within French fashion circles; she worked at both Balenciaga and Louis Vuitton under Nicolas Ghesquière. Ramsay-Levi looked to the entire history of the house and gave a nod to each of her predecessors. The hand-painted cotton dresses were inspired by Lagerfeld’s time at the House. McCartney and Philo both liked horses, and Ramsay-Levi embroidered the motif on trim velvet tailoring. A floaty micro-floral dress was inspired by Waight. But there was a lot of Ramsay-Levi infused as well, such as the tailored leather outerwear and skinny cropped jeans.

Chloe  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Chloe (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

 

GLITZ AND GLAMOUR

Anthony Vaccarello is paying tribute to the city of lights and to Mr. Yves Saint Laurent himself. The epic show was held outdoors, on a balmy night, with the Eiffel Tower sparkling in the background. Hundreds of spectators—the public and professionals—looked on, held in the awestruck moment. Vaccarello’s Saint Laurent girl wants to have fun, there were fanciful feathers, flirty glitter, and plenty of jaw-dropping boots. But the night was bittersweet for the house of Saint Laurent as Pierre Bergé passed away earlier this month. Vacarello started the show with hippie inspired looks that had a Moroccan feel,  it was a throwback to Yves Saint Laurant  and his love of Marrakech. There were floating, billowy-sleeved silk blouses, gold-coin–dot printed tulle tops, sparkling sequined dresses, bubbled frocks and fanciful ostrich feathers, all of it paired with the shortest of shorts and miniskirts and let’s not forget the over-the-top boots. This bold collection was sexy and confident!

Although the world is on edge today, with politics, threats of terrorists attacks and war, that didn’t reflect in many collections in Paris, there was a refreshing air of glitz and glamour; lighting the way for hopefulness and fun. Such collections included Balmain, Maison Margiela, Altuzarra and Dries Van Noten.

Saint Laurent  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Saint Laurent (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Balmain  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Balmain (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Dries Van Noten (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Dries Van Noten (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Maison Margiela  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Maison Margiela (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Altuzarra  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Altuzarra (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

EIGHTIES ARE BACK

A throwback to the Eighties was a continuing theme that made its way to Paris. Virgil Abloh, the designer behind the cult label Off-White, was inspired by Princess Diana as “the people’s princess.” Marking the 20-year anniversary of her tragic death, Abloh payed homage to the fashion icon, most notably with his farewell to streetwear and opted for a feminine collection filled with tulle and flounce. But Naomi Campbell stole the show – with her regal strut – wearing an asymmetrically flounced white jacket and cycle shorts quite the twist on eveningwear.

Isabel Marant and Mugler also gave a nod to the Eighties this season.

Off-White  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Off-White (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Isabel Marant  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Isabel Marant (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Mugler  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Mugler (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

THE INDIVIDUALISTS

Sure they may not be mainstream designers, but you have to give credit to those designers who season after season march to their own beat. Such avante-garde designers include Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, Jun Takahashi for Undercover, Junya Watanabe, Yohji Yamamoto and Rick Owens.

Comme des Garçons (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Comme des Garçons (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Undercover  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Undercover (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Junya Watanabe (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Junya Watanabe (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Yohji Yamamoto  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Yohji Yamamoto (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Rick Owens  (Photo Courtesy of  Vogue.Com)

Rick Owens (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)