Eco-Textiles - University of Fashion

Eco-Textiles

Eco-Textiles

This lesson will provide an overview of eco-textiles and the developments made to date in the world of sustainable textiles and best practices. It will cover the progress being made in reducing the environmental impact in the production, use, and disposal of textiles as well as the future of the global fashion industry as it continues to evolve and become more eco-conscious and aware.

Module Description Step
1 What are Eco Textiles? 1-4
2 What Are Sustainable Textiles? 1
3 What is Eco Fashion? 1-3
4 Eco-Resources vs Textile Industry Chemicals 1-2
5 Eco-Chemicals & Dyes 1-3
6 Water Consumption 1-4
7 Energy Consumption 1-4
8 What Are Organic Fibers, Recycled and Biodegradable Fibers? 1-2
9 What are Cellulosic Eco-Fibers? 1
10 What Are Regenerated Fibers? 1
11 What Are Protein Eco-Fibers? 1-2
12 What Are Synthetic Eco Fibers? 1
13 Other Eco-Fibers 1-4
14 What are Genetically Modified Organisms or GMOs? 1-2
15 What Is a Nano Fiber? 1-2
16 Sustainable & Environmental Consciousness 1
17 Technical Textiles 1
18 Eco-Standards & Labels 1
19 Eco-Fashion & Fair Trade 1-6
20 Future of Eco-Textiles 1-5
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MODULE 1 • What are Eco Textiles?

Step Description
1 Today’s lesson is Textiles Three – Eco-Textiles. This lesson will provide an overview of today’s eco-textiles and the developments made to date in the world of sustainable textiles. It will cover the progress being made by the fashion industry in reducing the environmental impact in the production, use, and disposal of textiles.
2 Let’s begin by defining eco-textiles

• Eco-textiles refers to all fabrics, clothing and accessories that have been manufactured, produced, and processed in an environmentally-conscious manner. This manner reduces any negative impact in the form of pollution or damage to the planet.

3 Now, let’s discuss the implications of early 21st century fashion.

  • For more than a decade, the fashion industry has shifted to ‘fast fashion.’ Fashion has become faster and cheaper.
  • The internet, global communications, marketing, competition, and offshore production have fueled consumer demand for goods and services, offered with greater variety and at lower prices. This dynamic has, in turn, fueled the need for faster fashion cycles.
  • We have learned that the growing fragmentation between production and consumption is unsustainable and has consequences in terms of environmental and social responsibility.

 

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