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Posts Tagged: "Versace"

LA BELLA VITA: MILAN SPRING 2022 SHOWS

- - Fashion Shows

A look from Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Fashion month has been a whirlwind of excitement as Milan Fashion Week wraps up before it heads over to its final stretch in Paris. While New York and London had a good balance between live shows and digital presentations, the runways in Milan were almost back to pre-pandemic levels. MFW, which kicked off on September 24th and ended on the 27th, was a jam-packed calendar consisting 173 shows that were a combination of physical event presentations, parties and 42 that were IRL shows.

A look from Antonio Marras’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Milan always delivers: craftsmanship, modern sophistication and polished elegance. Italian designers have a unique point of view and a refined hand that sets them apart from the rest.

A look from Fendi’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

THE BIG DESIGNER SWAP

The two most anticipated shows during Milan Fashion Week had to be Fendi and Prada. It was the first time a new project was unveiled: A Designer Swap!

Donatella Versace designed a Fendi collection and Kim Jones (Fendi’s artistic director) created a Versace collection. A PR stunt for sure, but one that worked!

At Prada, the brand presented two simultaneous shows, one at home in Milan and the other at Shanghai’s Bund One. At the Fondazione Prada in Milan, large LED screens surrounded the runway, and streamed the live feeds so guests could see different models marching by in the same looks.

A video of Prada’s Spring 2022 collection. Video courtesy of Prada on YouTube.

Rihanna also hosted her third volume for Savage x Fenty, her fierce lingerie line, and was one of the most hyped shows of the season. Fun fact: did you know Rihanna’s full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty?

Other noteworthy shows were TOD’S, Max Mara, Jil Sander, MM6 Maison Margiela and Versace. However, powerhouses Bottega Veneta and Gucci were notably missing. Gucci will head to Los Angeles to present its next collection on Nov. 2, coinciding with the LACMA Art+Film Gala taking place on Nov. 6, for which the fashion house is the founding and presenting sponsor.

In conjunction with the runway shows, the MFW calendar included a succession of not-to-be-missed events. For starters, “The Way We Are”, an exhibition devoted to Emporio Armani in celebration of brand’s 40-year anniversary. The exhibit opened on September 23rd at Armani/Silos, a fashion art space in Milan dedicated to Armani style. The jewelry brand Pomellato, held an exclusive cocktail party that kicked off Milan Fashion Week, and Versace closed out the week with a private dinner at Mysterious Baths to celebrate Italian designer Chiara Boni’s 50-year career, of course this was by invitation only. And there were plenty of festivities in between, case in point, Gucci’s day-long celebration (on September 25th) of its new Gucci Vault (online concept store featuring refurbished vintage Gucci pieces and collections by young designers), which was a far from a low-key return to MFW. Long envisioned by Alessandro Michele, Vault is the new online concept store created by Gucci, dedicated to the endless pursuit of wonders and beautiful things. Part time machine, part archive, part library, part laboratory – the identity of Vault is in continuous evolution.

Here is a link to the site: Edition 01 – VAULT Gucci

Milan Fashion Week also embraced emerging talent as the city hosted The World of Vogue Talents and the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana’s CNMI Sustainable Fashion Awards, both events celebrated promising, new designers and those who have taken extra steps to curb their impact on the planet.

A look from Del Core’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Here are a few of the hottest trends to come out of Milan Fashion Week:

FRINGE BENEFITS

Life is full of many splendored ‘strings’ as the spring 2022 runways were filled with a myriad of fabulous fringe. From crafty crochet fringe tops to latter day flappers, one thing’s for sure, fringe is in!

A look from Fendi’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from No. 21’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Etro’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway.)

A look from Tod’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Salvatore Ferragamo’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Versace’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

EASY STREET

Ciao, sculptured structure. Tailoring took a more relaxed turn, with a focus on effortless suits in an array of colors. Perfect transitional looks to go back to the office in.

A look from Jil Sander’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Fendi’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Antonio Marras’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Emporio Armani’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Etro’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Versace’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

OAT COUTURE

The world has been shut down for over 18 months now, and now that vaccinations are underway, it’s time to start your adventure. Designers are showing safari-inspired looks in neutral shades that would look just as good on a desert getaway as they would on city streets.

A look from Emporio Armani’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Blumarine’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Loro Piana’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Brunello Cucinelli’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Zanini’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

PALE FIRE

Will dainty hues ever go out of style for spring? Not this season, thanks to an Easter basket’s worth of pretty pastels.

A look from Prada’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Emporio Armani’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Max Mara’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Jil Sander’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Vivetta’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Sportmax’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

CALL OF THE WILD

Animal prints ruled the runways as Italian designers worked the mammal motif in everything from statement-making toppers to effortless maxi skirts.

A look from Roberto Cavalli’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Jil Sander’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Antonio Marras’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Salvatore Ferragamo’s Spring 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

TOUGH GIRL

Leather ruled the Italian runways as designers worked the material into everything from sexy dresses to cool outerwear and everything in between.

A look from Versace’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Prada’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Missoni’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Tod’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

GEOMETRY CLASS

Designers are getting graphic as geometric patterns and prints are making a splash this spring season.

A look from Missoni’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from MSGM’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Colville’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Charles Jeffrey Loverboy’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Tod’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

JEANOLOGY

Y2K fashion has made a major comeback thanks to TikTok. For spring 2022, Italian designers are keeping the trend alive with sexy, low-slung denim. It’s time to start working those abs again.

A look from Blumarine’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Etro’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from MSGM’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Missoni’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

GET SHORTY

Legs for days! Mini skirts and dresses have made a comeback as designers are baring it all on the runways for spring 2022.

A look from Prada’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Missoni’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Blumarine’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Versace’s Spring 2022 collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

So tell us, what trends are inspiring you? And if you didn’t know that Versace and Fendi swapped designers this season, would you have been able to see a difference?

 

RESORT 2022 – THE JOY OF DRESSING CONTINUES

- - Fashion Shows

Looks from Versace’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Versace)

As we celebrate Father’s Day and our newest U.S. federal holiday, Juneteenth (marking the end of slavery), and as the number of COVID cases continue to drop as vaccination numbers rise, we have a lot to look forward to post-pandemic.

After a year and a half of pandemic fashion, sales are soaring as people are starting to dress up again. What are they  gravitating to? The answer? Happy, colorful fashion. And judging by Resort 2022, the message is loud and clear.

Dior’s Cruise Show (Courtesy of YouTube).

Designers’ all got the memo and Resort 2022 collections were simply great. Just released images of the collections presented to buyers and the press included some fully staged spectacles in exotic locations that resulted in a desire to travel once again. Maria Grazia Chiuri presented her Dior Cruise collection in the birthplace of sports, the Panathenaic Stadium, where Ancient Greeks showed off their athletic capabilities circa 330 BC. Meanwhile, Virginie Viard took her graphic Chanel cruise collection to Provence, a beautiful region in the south of France, considered one of the area’s loveliest villages and the inspiration behind a few of Vincent van Gogh’s landscape masterpieces. Speaking of Van Gogh, have you reserved your tickets yet for the Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit touring the country?

Chanel’s Cruise Show. Courtesy of YouTube.

WHAT IS A RESORT COLLECTION?

For those unfamiliar with resort collection or cruise collection, and sometimes referred to as holiday or travel collection (collection croisière, in French), is an inter-season or pre-season line of ready-to-wear clothing produced by a fashion house or fashion brand in addition to the recurrent twice-yearly seasonal collections – spring/summer and autumn (or fall)/winter – heralded at the fashion shows in New York, London, Paris and Milan.

Cruise collections were initially created for affluent customers or “more seasoned jet-setters” going on cruises or vacationing in the warm Mediterranean during the winter months,. Cruise collections are synonymous with light and airy summer clothing and shipped to stores in the middle of the cold winter months. While the idea of cruise wear sounds old fashion and elitist, today’s fashion savvy customers view the season as a chance to spruce up their winter wardrobes as they head into Spring.

A look from No. 21’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: No. 21)

Resort collections typically hit the stores in November, perfect timing for Holiday shopping; the season is an extra opportunity for brands to rack up some extra sales. Resort has become an incredibly important season for vendors, beyond the promise of clothes with mainstream appeal, Resort remains on sales floors longest without ever going on sale, approximately 6 months before hitting the sales rack, which makes it the most profitable season for most brands.

A look from Brandon Maxwell’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Brandon Maxwell)

While the season is still in full swing, here are a few key trends of the season so far:

OUT OF CONTROL LOGOMANIA

Designer logos are everywhere this resort season from Gucci’s double G splattered all over suits, outerwear, and accessories, to a more subtle Versace Greek Key logo on dresses, tops and headscarves; one thing is for sure, you will definitely be noticed in these bold looks.

A look from Gucci’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Gucci)

A look from Versace’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Versace)

 

A look from Chanel’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Chanel)

A look from Balmain’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Balmain)

A look from Christian Dior’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Christian Dior)

MARCHING ORDERS

Legions of camouflage, utility pockets, and olive drab marched their way into the resort season, but this time with a chic and refined twist.

A look from Louis Vuitton’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Louis Vuitton)

 

A look from Balmain’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Balmain)

 

A look from Norma Kamali’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Norma Kamali)

 

A look from Proenza Schouler’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Proenza Schouler)

 

A look from Tod’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Tod’s)

YARN IT ALL

Miles beyond your basic knit sweater, Resort 2022 offers wonderfully tactile knit dresses that are as bold and beautiful as they are comfortable and effortless.

A look from Chloe’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Chloe)

 

A look from Christopher John Rogers’ Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Christopher John Rogers)

 

A look from Gabriela Hearst’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Gabriela Hearst)

 

A look from Missoni’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Missoni)

WHITE NOISE

Designers wiped the slate clean with an all-white palette that offered plenty of visual intrigue in alluring textures such as lace, eyelet, and crochet details.

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Alberta Ferretti)

 

A look from Zimmermann’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Zimmermann)

 

A look from Carolina Herrera’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Carolina Herrera)

 

A look from Ulla Johnson’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Ulla Johnson)

SPORTS CENTER

Take to the sporty life with chic riffs on everything from bike shorts to track jackets.

A look from Christian Dior’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Christian Dior)

 

A look from Hillier Bartley’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Hillier Bartley)

 

A look from MM6 Maison Margiela’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: MM6 Maison Margiela)

 

A look from MSGM’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: MSGM)

 

A look from Staud’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Staud)

POINT OF HUE

Designers softened their collections with pretty pastels that were a celebration of color, making the season a wonderful rhapsody in hue.

A look from Antonio Marras’ Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Antonio Marras)

 

A look from Emilio Pucci’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Emilio Pucci)

 

A look from Tory Burch’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Tory Burch)

 

A look from Preen by Thorton Bregazzi’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Preen By Thornton Bregazzi)

 

Looks from Oscar de la Renta’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Oscar de la Renta)

WELL SUITED

As the pandemic restrictions are lifted and a return to the office is in the near future, designers are offering plenty of pantsuits that are oh so chic yet effortlessly fabulous.

A look from Gucci’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit Gucci)

A look from Nehera’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Nehera)

 

A look from Khaite’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Khaite)

 

A look from St. John’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: St. John)

A look from Maria McManus’ Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Maria McManus)

MIX-N-MATCH

More is more. For resort 2022 designers are having fun mixing an array of prints and patterns, creating a visual feast for the eyes.

A look from Thom Browne’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Thom Browne)

 

A look from Sandy Liang’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Sandy Liang)

 

A look from Anna Sui’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Anna Sui)

 

A look from Philosopy di Lorenzo Serafini’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini)

 

A look from Carolina Herrera’s Resort 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Carolina Herrera)

So tell us, what was your favorite trend for the Resort 2022 season?

MILAN & PARIS: FALL 2021 COLLECTIONS PART 2

MILAN

Gigi Hadid is officially back on the runway. Here she is backstage at the Versace show with her sister Bella. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Ciao! Milan Fashion Week ended on a high note as designers looked to the promise of la vita bella (a beautiful life) as COVID-19 vaccines were being distributed throughout Europe as well as the world.

With the possibility of ‘back-to-normal’ in the not too distant future, Italian and French designers created energetically charged pieces at MFW and PFW with the hope that we will all be making a big splash when we return to a life of  normalcy.

(Video credit: Valentino’s live show)

Like New York and London Fashion Week, Milan Fashion Week shows were digitally-focused with one exception, namely, Valentino’s intimate runway show. The Milan schedule was packed with established designers such as Missoni, Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, Max Mara, Marni, and Dolce & Gabbana but the highlight of MFW was Kim Jones’ highly anticipated ready-to-wear debut for Fendi, which definitely delivered. Another show of note was Team Raf Simons and Miuccia Prada, who presented their second Prada collab women’s collection to raves. In addition to the traditional line-up of veteran designers, there were a few new names in the mix (finally), such as former Gucci designer Daniel Del Core.

(Video credit: Daniel Del Core’s debut collection)

Daniel Del Core’s debut collection was a socially distance IRL (in real life) show. It’s definitely every aspiring designer’s dream to climb the ladder, gathering experience on someone else’s dime and then ultimately launch their own brand. The proof of the pudding comes when you finally get to ‘strut-your-stuff’ with a runway show. This designer not only succeeded but did it during a pandemic! Check out Daniel’s show video. So, what do you think? Definitely rocking the 80s shoulder, right?

Covid is still wreaking havoc on the fashion show schedule and a few designers presented their digital collections after Milan Fashion Week, such as Versace’s Donatella Versace and Luke and Lucie Meier at Jil Sander. Dates for Bottega Veneta and Gucci are still up in the air.

A look from Prada’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Prada)

Nonetheless, MFW was full of bold trends, thanks to Italian designers’ flare for dramatics. For them, life after lockdown will be anything but boring. Here are our top five trends:

ALL BUNDLED UP

Baby it’s cold outside! For Fall 2021, designers in Milan showed plenty of terrific outerwear to keep you warm, yet oh so fashionable. Brands such as Fendi and Prada featured fabulous big, furry coats, while Valentino focused on charming capes that offer effortless glamour to any look. Meanwhile, the basic puffer got a makeover with unique shapes and bold colors, case in point, Marni.

A look from Marni’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

A look from Fendi’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Fendi)

 

A look from Prada’s Fall 2021 Collection and the accessory of the season, the zip pouch glove. (Photo Credit: Prada)

 

A look from Valentino’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Salvatore Dragone)

 

A look from MSGM’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

METALLICA

Glitz and glamour ruled the runways from futuristic silver suits at Annakiki to chainmail gowns at Salvatore Ferragamo, these glistening looks will rule the return of the red carpet.

A look from Annakiki’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

 

A look from Moschino’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Moschino)

 

A look from Salvatore Ferragamo’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Salvatore Ferragamo)

THE PREPPY HANDBOOK

Leave it to the Italians to give the classic Preppy look a much-needed update. For fall, designers like Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini and Etro are giving the otherwise conservative styles a cool makeover. Relaxed shapes, vibrant hues and edgy styling take preppy away from the country club to and onto the backs of our favorite fashion influencers.

A look from Etro’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Etro)

 

A look from Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini)

 

A look from Andrea Pompilio’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Andrea Pompilio)

BRIGHT OF WAY

Italian designers lit up the season with fantastically bright hues — pink, lavender, yellow, and teal were particularly popular on the runways. Brands like MSGM and Emilio Pucci clashed hues in the most creative and vibrant ways.

A look from Dolce & Gabbana’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Dolce & Gabbana)

 

A look from MSGM’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: MSGM)

 

A look from Emilio Pucci’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Emilio Pucci)

GREEN DAY

Olive has become the new neutral, giving the nod to military-inspired looks that marched down runways by the legion and received uniform salutes. From Ports 1961’s belted coat to Sportmax’s utility shirt, today’s military trend is chic and polished.

A look from Sportmax’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Sportmax)

 

A look from Max Mara’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Max Mara)

 

A look from Ports 1961’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Ports 1961)

PARIS

A look from Dries Van Noten’s Fall 2021Collection. (Photo Credit: Casper Sejersen)

As of the writing of this blog, Paris Fashion Week is still going strong. The fashion show season officially ends on March 10th, but in the City of Lights, the Fall 2021 collections started out with a bang! PFW never disappoints by offering collections that reflect the climate of today, but also gives us the possibilities of dreams and fantasies. Even during the turmoil we are all facing due to the global pandemic, the tremendous loss of life, economic uncertainty and political and social upheaval – designers are still pushing forward creating beautiful collections that offer an escape from the real world and that envision better days ahead.

The most anticipated show of the season was Gabriela Hearst’s debut collection for Chloé. It was an IRL outdoor fashion show and Hearst lived up to the hype.

(Video Credit: Chloé’s Fall 2021 Show)

Gabriela Hearst stayed true to the heritage of Chloé as she offered a collection filled with rich bohemian inspired looks. Hearst, a designer known to incorporate sustainable practices in her own collection, brought that sensibility to Chloé. She integrated lower-impact raw materials and put a plan in place to lower carbon emissions by 2025.  The collection was filled with Boho pieces that you will want to hold on to forever, such as a series of ponchos in stripes and solids, along with knit maxi dresses. Heart showed terrific outerwear from spliced trench coats to a cut-away shearling coat, as well as plenty of patchwork looks, including a leather patchwork jacket and skirt set. In a fashion season dominated by 80s shoulders, Hearst’s bohemian vibe had a ‘70s aesthetic that was fresh and modern.

OTHER TRENDS

SPACE AGE

Futuristic fashion was all over the runways of Paris, from Rick Owens’ sharp shoulders and shimmering bodysuits, to Courrèges’ mod high neck jacket. These looks will have you standing out in any crowd.

A look from Rick Owens’ Fall 2021Collection. (Photo Credit: Carlo Scarpato)

 

A look from Alexandre Vauthier’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Alexandre Vauthier)

 

A look from Vetements’ Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Gio Staiano)

 

A look from Courrèges’ Fall 2021Collection. (Photo Credit: Thomas de Cruz Media)

PRETTY IN PINK

Pink has been a favorite among the millennial set, so for fall, designers showed a range of pretty pink looks from Patou’s belted jacket with feathered trim to Coperni’s zippered dress. Pink is here to stay.

A look from Patou’s Fall 2021Collection. (Photo Credit: Patou)

 

A look from Coperni’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Fillippo Fior)

 

A look from Acne Studios’ Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acne Studios)

 

A look from Nina Ricci’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Nina Ricci)

 

THE COLD SHOULDER

Designers adopted a chic asymmetry with interesting bare shoulder effects.

A look from Coperni’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Fillippo Fior)

 

A look from Acne Studios’ Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acne Studios)

 

A look from Ellery’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Kym Ellery)

 

A look from Alaïa’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Piere-Ange Carlotti)

 

HERELD SQUARES

Check this out: windowpane, tartan, houndstooth and more. This fall, designers have gone mad for plaid.

A look fromVivienne Westwood’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Alice Dellal)

 

Looks from Marine Serre’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Marine Serre)

 

A look from Courrèges’ Fall 2021Collection. (Photo Credit: Thomas de Cruz Media)

 

WELL SUITED

Pantsuits were all over the runways, but in Paris, they were anything but business-like. Designers took the office staple to new heights by injecting them with the boldest of hues.

A look from Thebe Magugu’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Thebe Magugu)

 

A look from Loewe’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Loewe)

 

A look from Nina Ricci’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Nina Ricci)

 

A look from Isabel Marant’s Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Isabel Marant)

So tell us, do you have a favorite trend?

 

A FRESH START TO THE YEAR: PRE-FALL 2021

- - Fashion Shows

Versace’s Pre-Fall 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Theo Sion for Versace)

As we begin 2021, many of us are looking forward with hope to a vaccine that will help get us back to our pre-Covid lives. It can’t come a minute too soon. But what started out as a year of hope, took a discouraging turn here in the U.S. when only 6 days into 2021, we witnessed an insurrection in a failed attempt to bring down our government. As we write this, we still can’t believe it! It was a very sad day for our democracy.

 

Erdem’s Pre-Fall 2021 Collection. (Image Credit: Erdem)

So, who doesn’t need a little fashion in their life right about now? Thank goodness for Pre-Fall. Fashion designers are celebrating the new year by promoting a return to ‘dressing up.’ They want us to ditch our sweats and leisurewear and put some fashion effort into our lives. Sounds good to me! And once again, due to Covid restrictions, these designers came up with creative ways to present their collections.

GUCCI

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     (Video Credit: Gucci)

Leave it to Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, to present his Pre-Fall 2021 collection in a manner that is just as eclectic and creative as his clothes. Michele collaborated with American filmmaker Gus Van Sant, and the two creative geniuses came up with the project known as “GucciFest.” A digital project of 90 minutes shot throughout Rome over a 20-day period. The outcome, a seven-episode miniseries of visual delight.

The miniseries features plenty of familiar faces. In episode three, Ouverture of Something That Never Ended, the film starred Harry Styles. Styles, is not only known his music but also for his gender-fluid approach to fashion. The pop star made a cameo wearing a pink Gucci tee tucked into eco denim washed shorts. “When it comes to making art it’s about finding the thing you’ve always wanted to see that has never been made,” Styles says in the film while talking on a phone call. “It’s always an uncomfortable moment, I think, when you find the thing. You don’t know if you love it or hate it because you don’t really know what it is yet. But I think that’s the most exciting place to work in.”

The fashionable miniseries also includes stars such as Florence Welch (of the band, Florence and the Machine) in a vintage shop setting, as well as Billie Eilish (needs no explanation) walking her pet robot dog. The star of the miniseries, Italian actress Silvia Calderoni, is filmed throughout the empty ancient streets of Rome, all decked out in Gucci from head-to-toe.

As for the looks, they were Michele’s maximist aesthetic to the max. The collection had plenty of vibrant festive looks that ranged from a sequin pink and green zig-zag pattern pant paired with a purple sequin top and green bed-jacket; a purple pantsuit with gold embroidery; sheer lace lingerie inspired pieces; and plenty of beastly fur outerwear. For day, Michele featured a capsule of casual looks such as a blue athletic suit with the Gucci stripe running down the side; logo athletic t-shirts; flared denim pants; and plenty of denim shorts. The creative director also showed plenty of his vintage, ‘70s inspired looks with floral dresses; bow blouses; and geometric print coats.

Kudos to Michele for presenting his collection in such a creative, attention grabbing way.

CHANEL

(Video credit: Chanel)

As the old saying goes, “The show must go on!” And so Chanel filmed it’s pre-fall 2021 show at the Château de Chenonceau with a cast and crew of 300 and precisely one VIP guest: Kristen Stewart.

The Château de Chenonceau, is one of the jewels of France’s Loire Valley. The castle belonged to Catherine de’ Medici, the Italian-born, former queen of France, and throughout the grand estate you can find interlocking Cs, which were the Queen’s initials, but today, they look incredibly similar to the Chanel logo. The grand estate is also known as the Ladies’ Château, according to WWD, “Chenonceau has a history marked by a succession of powerful women, of which the Renaissance rulers, in particular, inspired the label’s founder, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel. That the French fashion house chose to stage its Métiers d’Art collection there is therefore something of a full-circle moment.”

The iconic house had hoped to invite approximately 200 guests to creative director Virginie Viard’s first fashion show outside of Paris, but due to a second lockdown in France, the brand was forced to revise its plans. So aside from the cast and crew, the show had only one guest, Kristen Stuart who will be featured in ads for the collection photographed by Juergen Teller.

As for Viard’s pre-fall collection for Chanel, she was inspired by many aspects of the 16th century castle. Lining the infamous chateau are beautiful gardens created by King Henry II’s mistress, Diane de Poitiers. Viard channeled the parterre designs of the garden and the delicate flowers as she reinterpreted the feminine motifs into rich embroideries. It was “a sophisticated take on a “Disney” Viard stated in an interview with WWD.

The creative director was also mesmerized by the chateau’s black and white checkerboard floors, which was a reoccurring print theme throughout the collection as Viard applied the motif to chessboard sequin miniskirts to fringe tweed maxi skirts. Overall, the collection had a Goth princess aesthetic with dramatic capes, poet blouses, and plenty of transparent black dresses.

Viard also played tribute to Coco Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld with her own playful interpretation of trompe l’oeil looks, with reimagines of the castle in Lego-like sequin bricks, used as cummerbund sashes that cinch the waists of full satin ball skirts and strapless gowns. The chateau’s tapestries also inspired Viard’s intarsia knit and embroidered sweaters. While the collection at times veered towards costume, there were still plenty of signature tweed jackets that the Chanel customers crave.

CHRISTIAN DIOR

(Video credit: Christian Dior)

 

Living in lockdown has been hard on all of us. Even the most fashionable influencers have photographed themselves in sweats and furry slippers. The spring collections were even filled with leisure-inspired looks that we all craved while many of us work from home, but Maria Grazia Chiuri, the creative director of Christian Dior, has had enough. For her pre-fall collection, Chiuri created her most animated collection to date. In an interview with Vogue Runway, the creative director states, “Now, we desire something that gives us energy. Something completely different.”

“After this year—so intense, so depressing—I would like to come back to the fashion that started my career: the playfulness that attracted me and my generation to fashion, and transform the Dior codes through this attitude,” she said. For Chiuri, a child of the 1970s, those roads had to lead to Elio Fiorucci. “My generation was super influenced by pop culture,” Chiuri recalled in the Vogue Runway interview. “At Fiorucci we saw another way of fashion. It was probably the moment that fashion was born in Italy, because we left our traditional clothes to go to this toy store and discover clothes we’d never seen in our life: different materials, and clothes from around the world.”

Inspired by Pop Art, Chiuri created an uncharacteristically colorful collection that was lighthearted and fun. The cheeky collection was filled with unapologetically fun pieces: a leopard coat; a silver jumpsuit; mirrored sequined party dresses; logo transparent raincoats; bold check mini skirt suits; and a humorous T Rex print that was found on everything from dresses to tote bags. In her atelier, Chiuri said, “We decided that when this is all over, we’re each going to choose a different color dress and have a big party. That’s the dream: to dance together.”

Let the festivities begin!

CAROLINA HERRERA

Carolina Herrera’s Pre-Fall 2021 Collection. (Image credit: Carolina Herrera)

It was only two months ago that Vice President-elect Kamala Harris wore a white pantsuit from Carolina Herrera for her acceptance speech. Harris chose white as a tribute to the woman’s suffrage movement and her Carolina Herrera suit will be forever be synonymous with Harris’ ceiling-shattering moment.

For pre-fall, Carolina Herrera’s creative director, Wes Gordon, emphasized the more playful side of the brand’s aesthetic. Gordon hopes that by the time the collection hits stores (between May and June) the world will be on a clear path to vaccination.

Inspired by Mia Farrow, circa Rosemary’s Baby, there was a nod to the swinging sixties with black and white zebra prints, polka dot patterns. in an assortment of sizes and colors, as well as the houses signature bow motifs. The collection was joyful and energetic with looks that ran the gamut from brightly hued ballgown skirts to multi-colored dotted shirtdresses.

Gordon struck the perfect balance between youthful and sophistication.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Oscar de la Renta’s Pre-Fall 2021 Collection. (Image credit: Oscar de la Renta)

Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia’s collection for Oscar de la Renta was a joie de vivre celebration. The optimistic collection was filled with vibrant colors, fruity prints, and plenty of skin.

The design duo dug into the house’s archives and were inspired by a pineapple motif worn by Linda Evangelista in a 1992 Oscar collection; they were looking for something happy and light after this dark pandemic year we’re all living through. The pineapple pattern was found on several looks ranging from a block print on a simple green shift to a life-like color on a bandeau top with pouf sleeves. Other key looks included an array of brightly colored shorts, short day dresses, playful striped rompers, and a few strapless cocktail confections.

Garcia joked in an interview with Vogue Runway, “Piña coladas all day long.”

So tell us, how optimistic are you feeling in your fashion choices for 2021?

LONDON AND MILAN SPRING 2021 FASHION SHOWS TAKE THE PLUNGE

- - Fashion Shows

Bora Aksu’s Spring 2021 Presentation. (Photo: Courtesy of Bora Aksu)

ON WITH THE SHOW!

While New York showed only a handful of live shows and presentations due to Covid concerns, at London and Milan fashion week it was almost business as usual. London designers staged over 30 live shows, presentations, fashion events or personal appointments, while Milan blended 28 physical shows with 24 digital ones, making Milan, thus far, the city with the most in real life showings. As American buyers, the  fashion press (and the rest of us) virtually crossed the pond for London and Milan fashion week, we all got to watch some pretty amazing spring 2021 fashion in the privacy of our home, sitting on our pandemic-safe couch. Gotta love technology!

LONDON’S CALLING

A look from Gareth Pugh’s Spring 2021 Collection. (Photo: Courtesy of Gareth Pugh)

Stating that all live events would adhere to social distancing and hygiene g regulations, the British Fashion Council kicked off LFW on September 17th and wrapped up on September 22. Burberry opened the season with a live-streamed outdoor show to rave reviews. Throughout the week 80 designers took part in London Fashion Week – 30 IRL (in real life) and 50 digitally.

The week hosted a mix of womenswear and menswear designers, but what really stood out was that the season will no longer be known as Spring 2021, but rather “London Fashion Week September 2020,” in a move towards a more season-less approach.

Here are the highlights:

BURBERRY

Riccardo Tisci opened London Fashion Week with a bang. The influential designer live-streamed his Burberry show in a hauntingly beautiful forest. His theme: “a love story between a mermaid and a shark.” The dark theme was the perfect parable as to how we’ve all felt the past seven months locked in quarantine and working from home. Tisci’s under-the-sea analogy was anything but kitsch. The collection was rather chic and sophisticated with beautiful shades of blues; “Blue is the new beige,” Tisci teased in an interview with Vogue Runway, name-checking Burberry’s signature color.

Being in quarantine with his 92 year-old mother and relatives in his childhood home near Lake Cuomo was a breath of fresh air for the designer and gave him a new sense of appreciation for life. According to his Vogue interview, the rootsy surroundings of his quarantine made him reconnect with his childhood and the innocent mindset with which he pursued those dreams. “You open the drawer of your past and see how far you’ve gone as a person, how much you’ve done for yourself, and for others. Your dreams have come true,” he reflected.

His collection for Burberry was filled with sea-centric references – from illustrations to embellishments – that were innocent and raw. Tisci’s shark motif has been a signature of the designer from the start of his career. As for his mermaids, Tisci worked with peplum shapes, glistening dresses, and spliced trench coats.

Tisci perfectly infused Burberry’s classic aesthetic with his signature street-style. Sometimes, going back to your roots is what a designer needs to find their footing again, as his mother would say, Bravo Riccardo!

DURO OLOWU

A look from Duro Olowu’s presentation. (Photo Credit: Luis Monteiro for Duro Olowu)

There is no doubt about it, 2020 will forever be known as the year of the sweatsuit. But as  Duro Olowu puts it quite simply in an interview with Vogue Runway, “Ease doesn’t have to mean track pants.”

Olowu presented his collection to a handful of editors and buyers in his London boutique. The joyful collection was filled with bold colors and striking prints that were inspired by Emma Amos, an African American painter who died in May of this year. Olowu infused bold hand-painted striped prints that were chic and sophisticated, case in point, the elongated tunic over wide leg pants, gave off an elegant loungewear vibe.

The designer is also experimenting with new shapes, focusing on sarong-like midi-length silhouettes that feel fresh and new. His line-up was filled with 1950s lean looks that were refined yet youthful. These clothes are a promise to brighter days ahead and they definitely will put a smile on your face.

MOLLY GODDARD

A look from Molly Goddard’s Spring 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Ben Broomfield for Molly Goddard)

Molly Goddard held intimate appointments in her studio as she presented her eclectic spring collection filled with bright, frothy, tulle confections. Mannequins were scattered throughout the space, each wearing one on Goddard’s jubilant looks. The collection was filled with ruffled, voluminous skirts and dresses, all in vibrant colors, as well as checkerboard neon sweaters, an A-line anorak dress and even floral printed denim pants.

Also, for the first time, Goddard decided to offer many of her unique dresses in white, which would make the perfect wedding dress for the cool young bride who wants an anything but traditional dress.

SIMONE ROCHA

A look from Simone Rocha’s spring 2021 collection. (Photo: Courtesy of Simone Rocha)

With all the COVID-19 U.K. regulations set in place, Simone Rocha held an intimate presentation at the Hauser & Wirth gallery. The cavernous white walls were the perfect backdrop for Rocha’s beautifully, intricate looks to come to life. In an interview with Vogue Runway, Rocha stated “I’m not going to lie: I’ll be the first to say I love runway shows, now that the pace of shows has been stripped away, I wanted to find a space to represent that. It’s important to me to find a way to physically share the collection, just for the silhouette, texture, and weight of it. Clothes are made of cloth, and emotions, and they come to life on a body.”

Rocha’s collection was filled with voluminous, rounded shapes in gilded brocades, rich cotton embroideries, delicate pearl embroideries, and intricate scalloped edge cottons. Close up, the layers held little messages: on tulle veiling, patterns of castles; in the broderie anglaise, SR monograms. “Castles in faraway places,” Rocha laughed. “I think that’s the escapism we’re all craving.”

ERDEM

Just like Riccardo Tisci for Burberry, Erdem Moralioglu was inspired by fantasy for his spring 2021 collection and also opted to hold an audience-less runway show in the English forest. Moralioglu spent his quarantine time reading. His collection was inspired by a Susan Sontag novel, The Volcano Lover, Sontag’s portrait of the 18th-century beauty Emma Hamilton who married a volcanologist obsessed with Grecian vases and had a passionate love affair with Lord Nelson.

Moralioglu, like his inspiration, looked to beauty during this fearful time. The designer featured regal 18th century-inspired floral jacquard dresses with puff-sleeves juxtaposed against cozy cardigans, military-inspired outerwear and an embroidered admiral jacket.

In an interview with Vogue Runway, Moralioglu stated, “I get asked the same question: Are women’s tastes and wants changing now, given the situation? On the contrary, we have a customer who’s still buying special pieces. It’s the want for something you can wear in five and 10 years. As I enter my 15th year doing this, the most thrilling thing is seeing someone wearing your work from 10 years ago. I’ve always been obsessed with permanence. When it feels like the end of the world, doesn’t someone need a pink moiré hand-embroidered gown?”

CHRISTOPHER KANE

An abstract painterly look from Christopher Kane. (Photo: Courtesy of Chrisopher Kane)

If this pandemic has taught us anything (other than the importance of wearing a mask, frequent hand-washing and social distancing) it’s a time for reflection, a reminder not to put off things that bring you joy. Christopher Kane did just that in his spring 2021 collection. The designer revisited his love of painting using multicolored glitter that he experimented with as a kid. Kane’s flagship store was turned into an exhibition space for his collection presentation, with easels and canvases featuring his paintings that he’d created during lockdown.

As for the clothes, which were displayed on mannequins, Kane recreated his artwork onto coats, dresses, and tops. Key looks included a brushstroke print long sleeve midi dress, a paint dot splatter shirt, and a brush-stroke striped sweater. With this charming collection one thing is clear, Kane had a lot of fun creating these pieces.

 

 

MILANO MODA

Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2021 patchwork show was inspired by Sicily. (Photo Credit: Gorunway.com)

Leave it to the Italians to add a new word to fashion’s lexicon. Milan’s Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana billed the city’s spring 2021 shows as a “phygital fashion week.” Phygital fashion week is a portmanteau, a blend of physical, in person shows, and a digital show, a format that has become essential during COVID.  Milan’s phygital fashion week took place from September 22 – 28th.

Everyone in the fashion community is asking themselves…is this hybrid model of phygital shows and presentations the future of fashion week? Only time will tell.

PRADA

Prada was hands-down the most anticipated show of the season and rightfully so, since this was the debut of the Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons collaboration. The partnership was announced last February, pre-pandemic lockdown, and it was probably the most celebrated fashion news of 2020. The designers staged a digital runway show that was viewed on Prada.com and then opened up to a conversation with Prada and Simons answering questions that were submitted online. It was a genius move, giving Prada consumers the chance to listen to their “backstage-conversation.”

As for the clothes, a new Prada ‘uniform’ was introduced. You may remember that in the ‘90s Prada’s minimalistic uniform looks launched Miuccia Prada into fashion stardom. According to Miuccia and Simmons, the new Prada is all about paring back and the streamlining of excesses to get at what’s essential. The collection’s 40 looks were composed of long, narrow trousers; a sleeveless, tunic-length tee with the famous triangle logo; statement making outerwear with clutched coats; full skirts; holey (not the religious kind) knits; all worn with pointy-toed slingback kitten heels in a contrasting color. “How Miuccia dresses is very often a kind of uniform one way or another, and that was direct inspiration for me for the show,” Simons said in the interview.

The collection was filled with past references that became signatures for both designers. Case in point, Prada’s spring 1996 show of “ugly prints” reemerged on hoodies and matching full skirts, as well words and graphic silk-screened motifs on pastel shift dresses, a representation of Simmons’ personal work.

Miuccia and Simons lived up to the fashion world’s anticipation and thus far was the show of the season.

FENDI

Fendi opened Milan Fashion Week with the first in-person, live, runway show, featuring both their men’s and women’s collections. And the fashion crowd couldn’t be happier. The show opened with photographic prints taken by Silvia Venturini Fendi from her bedroom window during lockdown. These soft graphic prints were found on everything from transparent shirt dresses, to tailored blazers and men’s suits.

As Italy was the first of the European cities to suffer from Covid 19, spending several months in lock-down mode, Fendi believes this will forever change the way we dress, and answered the call with sophisticated alternatives for WFH (work-from-home) looks. The collection had plenty of chic loungewear and pajama fashion, as well as floaty wood-printed caftans. Fendi closed the show with bedding-inspired looks that ranged from cozy satin quilted outerwear to pale lace embroidered linen tops and skirts. “This reminded me of Karl [Lagerfeld],” said Fendi pre-show in an interview with Vogue Runaway: “He had a love for bed linen, he had a big collection.”

This collection marked the final transition of Silvia’s decades long collaboration with Karl Lagerfeld, and her latest collaboration with newly appointed creative director Kim Jones. This announcement will surely make Fendi the most anticipated show for the Fall 2022.

ETRO

Etro’s Spring 2021 Show. (Photo Credit: Gorunway.com)

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a difficult and terrifying time for us all, but if there is any silver lining to this nightmare, it is that the lockdowns have brought many families back together. This is the case for Veronica Etro, as she spent her time during lockdown at home with her mom as they listened to old Neapolitan songs, “we were bewitched by the serenity, the timelessness, and the elegance” Veronica Etro stated during her pre-show press conference. The music made her reminisce about her “2019 trip to Ischia, Capri, Naples, and Positano, and—maybe because we were so patriotic during that period—I thought, okay, let’s make the collection all about Italy.”

Veronica dug deep into her family’s print archives and turned out a youthful and vibrant collection filled with effortless vacation looks that ranged from a sexy scarf print bikini worn under a glamorous open front maxi skirt, to charming marinière knits. There were plenty of effortlessly chic printed dresses; flirty nautical themed bra tops and shorts; as well as youthful paisley shorts worn with menswear inspired shirts.

This charming collection was the perfect beach escape for next summer and beyond.

ALBERTA FERRETTI

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Spring 2021 Show. (Photo Credit: Corunway.com)

Alberta Ferretti also opted for a live, in-person show this season, as she held her runway extravaganza in the open air in one of the courtyards of Milan’s Castello Sforzesco, as guests enjoyed the sunshine. The perfect backdrop to Ferretti’s signature romantic aesthetic.

The collection was a stark contrast to the state of the world. In a pre-interview with Vogue Runway, Ferretti stated, “In this difficult situation, so harsh and unforgiving in many ways, my gut instinct was to embrace kindness and a certain seductive softness. I believe that it stems from self-confidence and from the acceptance of the natural power of femininity.

Ferretti’s approach to the season was practical, as she offered her women a wardrobe that fits all of their needs. The designer showed a variety of feminine dresses that ranged from ethereal, flowing, maxi dresses to flirty macramé lace mini dresses – all with a bohemian yet sophisticated hand. The collection also featured plenty of every-day pieces, such as pastel denim pants, high-waisted fitted trousers paired with bralettes, embroidered tops and cropped blouses. Overall, Ferretti’s collection was a sophisticated and fresh approach to femininity.

VERSACE

Always with a flair for the dramatic, Donatella Versace literally took her viewers “under the sea” for her spring 2021 collection: the aquatic theme being a reoccurring motif for many designers this season. Versace staged a full on live-streamed show, with no audience, just her team. The runway’s backdrop…the imagined ruins of Atlantis with a water current streaming down its projected walls. The mythical backdrop was the perfect setting for Versace’s provocative ocean-themed collection.

Ever since the Versace label launched in 1978, by her beloved brother Gianni, the brand has always been known for its sex appeal and its loud and vibrant prints and colors. For spring 2021, Donatella embraced the DNA of the house and it was a joyful ode to life, featuring both menswear and womenswear looks. Versace started off with a maritime motif with tailored navy blazers and shorts. Then the collection took on a Malibu Barbie twist, with vibrant prints in pumped-up colors. Starfish print dresses that ranged from sheaths to baby-doll silhouettes; coral reef motif and ocean themes made their way onto everything, from skirts and tops to shorts and swimwear. Versace also showed moments of ingenuity with micro-pleated dresses trimmed with twirly ruffles, which resembled a graceful jellyfish swimming in the ocean.

Versace stated that her archival sea collection was also a metaphor for a new world of wonders, which translated to a diverse runway. The co-ed show was cast with a variety of ethnicities, as well as diversified sizes, embracing her message of body positivity and gender-nonconformity. Brava Donatella for such an inclusive representation of the world.

MOSCHINO

Let’s give it up to Jeremy Scott for producing the most creative show of the season. The digital masterpiece was an elaborate puppet show with marionette replicas of his favorite models walking down a runway and doll replications of his audience. It was a visual delight that eased the stress of a world gone mad. In an interview with Vogue Runway, Scott stated,  “The best thing I could do for everyone who’s stressed about the election, the pandemic, social unrest, and the future was to give the gift of fantasy and take us away from all of it for a few minutes; let us enjoy this little fashion world of ours.”

Scott’s whimsical show may have come at a huge expense, but it was a much needed spectacular visual experience. As for the clothes, they were each re-proportioned to fit the dimensions of the marionettes without losing their authentic properties. The collection was an homage to haute couture and brought Scott’s masterful construction to the forefront of the collection, case in point, a cocktail dress that was sliced open, revealing another dress under it with a photograph of an inside-out embroidered dress. Other key looks included a feather trim gown with an exposed bone corseted bust, deconstructed cocktail dresses, as well as spliced outerwear.

When asked if fashion is still relevant, Scott  stated “People are like, ‘Sweatpants forever!’ But I love exciting things that are one-of-a-kind and refined. We’re all desperate for that. I constantly kept getting dressed up every day even if I wasn’t seeing people. It’s part of who I am.” The London and Milan shows seemed to prove that point.

So far it looks like NYFW, LFW and MFW are all channeling happier times. Reminds us of the old 1920s song by Jack Yellen & Milton Ager, Happy Days Are Here Again, became the the theme song of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Presidential campaign in 1932 and is still played at Democratic conventions today.

So tell us, do you have a fav collection?

STAYING SILENT IS OUT – FASHION ACTIVISM IS IN

Prabal Gurung created political statement T-shirts that were worn by social media influencers and street style stars during NY Fashion Week 2017.  From Left to right: Shea Marie, Caroline Vreeland , Bryanboy, Tina Craig, Irene Kim,  Aimee Song  and Chriselle Lim . (Photo Courtesy of Forbes.com)

The Men’s Spring 2020 shows have just wrapped up, and while the runways were filled with plenty of notable trends, such as soft suiting at Givenchy, gender bending at Comme des Garçons, nautical looks at Prada, and romantic prints at Louis Vuitton  – the one trend that has been gaining momentum is the “designer as activist.” Fashion activism is nothing new. In the 1930s the Keffiyeh became a symbol of political uprising and rebellion. In the 1960s, designers gave us peace symbol T-shirts in protest of the Vietnam war,  and mini-skirts, which became the symbol for women’s rights and sexual liberation. In 2017, Cosmopolitan listed 22 designers who used their runway shows to promote a particular cause or in protest of global injustice. From pussy hats to white bandanas with the hashtag #TiedTogether (a symbol of inclusivity and acceptance), according to designer Talbot Runhof, “If you have a platform to say something and you don’t, then shame on you.” In the age of social media and the internet, where opinions and messages are delivered in lightning speed, designers, actors and other influencers feel duty-bound and a certain responsibility to bring attention to the relationship between fashion, politics and social change.

Here are a few noteworthy designers who have shown more than just clothes on their runways, past & present.

OFF-WHITE

Virgil Abloh has developed a cult following with his collections for Off-White and the brand is worn by street style stars around the globe. For his men’s Spring 2020 show, Abloh focused on the negative effects of plastic and saving the environment. According to Abloh, “Plastic: once hailed as a miracle material, now condemned as a major pollutant — and possibly about to be considered a work of art.” The show’s invite was a clear plastic invitation with the words “plastic” printed on it.  Abloh believes plastic can be recycled and used to create something beautiful, such as art. Plastic even made its way in the collection with plastic rain gear and a hazmat suit.

As for the clothes, Abloh looks to street art for inspiration and tapped Futura, a contemporary of Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, for the prints in this collection, case in point, a hand-painted white coat, top and pant look.To address his environmental concerns, Abloh featured an aquatic theme throughout the collection with shades of blue tie dye prints and amoeba-shaped appliqué motifs on knits.

The show ended with the models stomping through a beautiful field of white carnations that was created for the show. Abloh’s message was load and clear, we must protect our environment.

Virgil Abloh at his men’s Fall 2020 Off-White Collection. (Photo courtesy of theguardian.com)

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney has been one of the biggest advocates of the environment, a pioneer of sustainable fashion and an animal rights activist, since the creation of her namesake label in 2001.  McCartney Men’s 2020 collection was presented in a lush garden in Milan’s city center. According to Vogue.com, McCartney stated, “Let’s just forget fashion for a moment and savor all the natural beauty around us and talk about flowers!”

McCartney focused on playful tailoring, hand-printed silk shirts, ties and shorts with horse motifs, lightweight dusters and loose-fitting jumpsuits with satellite Earth prints and of course a collection that was fur free. McCartney kept the collection light and humorous, but her fight to save the earth is a serious one.

Stella McCartney’s Fall 2020 Men’s Collection. (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Pyer Moss

Herby Jean-Raymond launched his menswear label Pyer Moss in 2013 and followed up with a women’s collection shortly thereafter. In the few seasons Jean-Raymond has been presenting, the designer has quickly become known for his social activist stands. Most notably, he is inspired by the heritage of African-Americans, as well as social issues that this community faces today.

Pyer Moss Spring 2019. (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dior

In July 2016 Dior announced that Maria Grazia Chiuri would be the first female creative director at Dior. Chiuri has been making political statements ever since.  T-shirts screen printed with “We Should All Be Feminists” and “Dio(R)evolution” were sold with proceeds going to Rihanna’s Clara Lionel Foundation, which fights against injustice, inequality & poverty and promotes access to education.

Christian Dior Spring 2017 Collection. (Photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Women’s Rights

Fall 2017 was a big season for designers to speak out about social injustice. Attendees at Missoni’s Fall show each received pink pussy hats (madefamous by the Women’s March on Washington in January 2017). Guests proudly wore the hats, as did the models during the finale.

According to Angela Missoni, creative director for the label, their message for Fall 2017 was all about “femininity in our times, prepared to confront the conflicts and dilemmas of our contemporary society: the conditions, needs, and rights of all women and minorities.”

Missoni’s Fall 2017 Show. (Photo courtesy of DailyNation.com)

Rio Uribe, the designer behind Gypsy Sport, gave a passionate speech before his show which focused on homelessness and refugee tent cities. “I wanted to talk to you guys a little bit about my show,” he said from a mic backstage. “The Fall/Winter ’17 collection was inspired honestly by people who live on the street and just don’t have much fashion in their life or any of the luxuries that we take for granted. … I don’t want anyone who is gay, or Muslim, or disabled, or mentally ill, or a veteran, or a drug addict, or a runaway to have to live on the street just because someone’s not willing to give them a chance.”

Gypsy Sport Fall 2017 Show. (Photo courtesy of cosmopolitan.com)

Prabal Gurung created “The Future is Female” T-shirt for his Fall 2017 show. According to Gurung, “So to me feminism is not just a trending topic. It’s the only way I’ve known, even before I knew what [feminism] was.”

Bella Hadid sporting Prabal Gurung’s feminist T-shirt at his Spring 2017 show. (Photo courtesy of Forbes.com)

“All-inclusive” hit an all-time high in Fall 2017 as Christian Siriano enlisted models of all sizes to walk his runway show, from plus-size & petite to curvy, as well as plenty of racially diverse women. The 2008 Project Runway winner consistently speaks out against fashion magazines’ unrealistic body standards that are set by the modeling industry. He believes designers have the power to change this by adjusting their hiring process and sizing.

A plus sized model walks Christian Siriano’s show during his 2017 fashion show. (Photo courtesy of cosmopolitan.com)

During Tommy Hilfiger’s 2017 extravaganza in Venice Beach, models strutted down the runway wearing white bandanas as part of Business of Fashion’s #TiedTogether initiative. According to Business of Fashion founder and CEO Imran Amed, this campaign encouraged people to wear the colorless handkerchief “to make a clear statement in support of human unity and inclusiveness amidst growing uncertainty and a dangerous narrative peddling division.”

#TiedTogether Bandanas Hit Runway for First Time at Tommy Hilfiger. (Photo courtesy of Hollywoodreporter.com)

Also in 2017,  The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) partnered with Planned Parenthood to launch the “Fashion Stands With Planned Parenthood” campaign to raise awareness about women’s health care during New York Fashion Week.

Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour sporting a Planned Parenthood badge. (Photo courtesy of 14urban.com)

At the New York Spring 2018 shows, a “Get out and Vote” message dominated in advance of the U.S. mid term elections.

Prabal Gurung walks the runway in a Vote T-shirt show during New York Fashion Week Spring 2018. (Photo courtesy of Glamour.com)

Going Fur Free

While Stella McCartney has been creating fur-free and leather-free clothes for years, many designers have now jumped on the bandwagon.

As of September 2018, Burberry announced that it would also be going fur-free, a big move ever since Riccardo Tisci became the creative director for the label. The brand will no longer be using rabbit, fox, mink, and Asiatic raccoon fur, though they will still feature angora, shearling, and leather.

Burberry goes fur free as of Sept. 2018. (Photo courtesy of teenvogue.com)

Shockingly, in March 2018, Donatella Versace announced that she would no longer be using fur in her collections. “Fur? I am out of that. I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn’t feel right,” she told 1843 magazine.

Versace goes fur free. (Photo courtesy of teenvogue.com)

In June 2017, protesters interrupted a live interview with Michael Kors at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, with signs that read “Michael Kors has blood on his hands.” This prompted Michael Kors to announce that his company would be going fur free as of December 2018.

Michael Kors goes fur free. (Photo courtesy of teenvogue.com)

In October 2017, Gucci announced it would be going fur-free as well. Alessandro Michele is opting for sustainable alternatives to create his “grandma-chic” vibe. Prada also added their name to the fur-free list as of 2020.

Gucci goes fur free. (Photo courtesy of teenvogue.com)

Following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles, New York is now considering a ban on fur as well, however, there is a lot of push back. One of the oldest industries in New York City dating back to when Henry Hudson explored the region in 1609 and found French traders bartering for furs with Native Americans. New York became a thriving trading post of beaver and other skins that traveled through New York Harbor and to Europe. In fact, the official New York crest includes beavers, whose valuable pelts helped fuel the early fur trade. Stay tuned!

Designers with a History of Rocking the Boat

English fashion designer Katherine Hamnett is best known for her political T-shirts and ethical business philosophy. In 1983 she stated, “If you want to get the message out there, you should print it in giant letters on a T-shirt.” Celebrities such as George Michael (who was part of Wham at the time) wore one of her “Choose Life” tees in a music video for “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go.” Roger Taylor of Queen, wore her “WORLDWIDE NUCLEAR BAN NOW” T-shirt during Queen’s historic appearance at the first edition of the Rock in Rio festival in Rio de Janeiro.

Political T-shirts by Katharine Hamnett. (Photo courtesy of lovewildlivefree.com)

Vivienne Westwood is another British fashion designer and businesswoman, who was largely responsible for bringing modern punk and new wave fashion into the mainstream. Westwood has retail shops worldwide and sells a variety of merchandise; some of it linked to her many political causes, such as the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, climate change and civil rights groups.

Vivienne Westwood Red Label SS14 fashion show. (Photo courtesy of Alan Davidson/The Picture Library LTD.)

In 2000, John Galliano created one of the most controversial fashion shows ever. For his Christian Dior Haute Couture collection, Galliano was inspired by the Paris homeless. As a master of shock value, his message rang loud and clear in a city of beauty and glamour. The show created such controversy that homeless activists picketed outside the Dior headquarters and riot police had to be called in to deal with the protesters. As a result, Dior’s flagship was closed for two hours and Galliano had to issue an apology statement,  “I never wanted to make a spectacle of misery.”

Christian Dior by John Galliano, spring/summer 2000 haute couture show. (Photo courtesy of newyorktimes.com)

Alexander McQueen’s inspiring showmanship is greatly missed, ever since his suicide on February 11, 2010. For the late designer’s Fall 2009 collection, McQueen took an environmental stance on the runway as his models dressed in fiercely tailored coats, boxy jackets and airy gazar dresses walked around a heap of trash. McQueen even referenced trash in some of his looks such as aluminum can accessories.  It was all so hauntingly beautiful.

Alexander McQueen’s  Fall 2009 ready-to-wear women’s collection during Paris Fashion Week. (Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol)

Karl Lagerfeld is another designer who is greatly missed for his theatrics. The late designer passed away on February 19, 2019 in Paris. For his Spring 2015 collection, Lagerfeld took a feminist stance and created a playful protest for woman’s equality. According to Vogue.com, “ Cara Delevingne and Caroline de Maigret had megaphones in hand as a parade of models including Kendall Jenner, Georgia May Jagger, Edie Campbell, Joan Smalls, and even Gisele Bündchen, brandished signs that read “History is Her Story,” “Feminism Not Masochism,” “We Can Match the Machos” and “Ladies First.” Even male model Baptiste Giabiconi waved a “He For She” banner, which just might be our favorite nod to Emma Watson’s global UN campaign yet. Perhaps the “Free Freedom” sign was a winking nod to Free the Nipple, the cause du jour for models like Delevingne, who opened the show and Kendall Jenner, who Instagrammed about it post show. “I’m Every Woman” blared from the speakers, and everyone danced in their seats.”

Chanel spring 2015 collection. (Photo courtesy of elle.com)

While some fashion critics predicted a worldwide boycott of Nike products after their controversial “Just Do It” campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick, they were proven wrong when the company reported a 10 percent jump in income. It turns out that millennials expect companies to take a position on social and political issues.

TELL US, HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO YOU THAT BRANDS TAKE A STAND ON SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES ?

Met Gala 2018: Divine Creations on the Red Carpet

Left to right: Kim Kardashian in Versace, Madonna in Jean Paul Gaultier, Gigi Hadid in Versace, Sarah Jessica Parker in Dolce & Gabbana, and Zendaya in Versace (Photo courtesy of Cosmopolitan.com)

Left to right: Kim Kardashian in Versace, Madonna in Jean Paul Gaultier, Gigi Hadid in Versace, Sarah Jessica Parker in Dolce & Gabbana, and Zendaya in Versace (Photo courtesy of Cosmopolitan.com

“Just like a Prayer,” Madonna’s 80s hit came to life at this year’s Met Gala. No matter what your religion, the Met Gala Red Carpet was filled with regal references, courtesy of the Catholic Church. It came as no surprise to fashion industry insiders that the Costume Institute choose such a controversial theme, “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,”  especially considering that their 1983 exhibition, “The Vatican Collections: The Papacy and Art,” was the third most visited exhibit in the museum’s history (#1- Treasures of Tutankhamen-1978-79-1,360,000 visitors, #2-Mona Lisa 1963- 1,077,521 visitors). The Met is hoping that this exhibit will be a big money-maker. It certainly is one of the largest since it includes two locations, the Met Fifth Ave and the Met Cloisters.

(Photo courtesy of the Met)

(Photo courtesy of the Met)

However, this time around, Christianity, as interpreted by the Costume Institute, meant mixing the sacred and the profane. Included in the exhibit are ecclesiastical garments on loan from the Vatican, jostling for attention right next to high fashion from the usual suspects, Dolce & Gabbana, Versace, Chanel, Balenciaga and Valentino.

The Met Gala is fashion’s biggest night. This year the event was hosted by Rihanna, Amal Clooney, Donatella Versace, Anna Wintour and Stephen and Christine Schwarzman. As for the Red Carpet, there were plenty of religious imagery, complete with headpieces and lots of crosses. With no shortage of religious references, the bold and the beautiful competed for attention by feigning controversy, while remaining well within the boundaries of the game. Let’s thank Madonna for getting out Jean Paul Gaultier!

Aman Clooney in Richard Quinn abd George Clooney (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Aman Clooney in Richard Quinn abd George Clooney (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Bee Shaffer in Valentino and Anna Wintour (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Bee Shaffer in Valentino and Anna Wintour (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Some of the most memorable images of the night included Rihanna’s papal crown and cape designed by Margiela; Katy Perry wore 6-foot angel wings; and Cardi B’s jeweled headpiece and plunging beaded gown, this was her first Met Gala red carpet and she did not disappoint.

Katy Perry in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Katy Perry in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Rapper 2 Chainz popped the question to Kesha Ward, with whom he already has three children. She said yes, though it was unclear if this was Epps’ original proposal. Meanwhile, Kim Kardashian walked the carpet solo without her husband Kanye West, which was a surprise considering West’s love of fashion and who has attended the event for the past few years.

2 Chainz Propsed to Kesha Ward at the Met Gala

2 Chainz Propsed to Kesha Ward at the Met Gala

It was no surprise that the accessory that topped all others of the night were over-the-top headpieces. Crowns, veils and even a Pope Mitre hat!

Amazing Headpieces

Rihanna in Maison Margiela  (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Rihanna in Maison Margiela
(Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Jeremy Scott and Cardi B in Moschino (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Jeremy Scott and Cardi B in Moschino (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Solonge Knowles (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Solonge Knowles (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Joan Smalls (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Joan Smalls (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Priyanka Chopra (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Priyanka Chopra (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Here are some of the best looks of the night:

 

Madonna and Jean Paul Gaultier (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Madonna and Jean Paul Gaultier (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Jennifer Lopez in Balmain (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Jennifer Lopez in Balmain (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Lana del Ray and Jared Leto, both in Gucci (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Lana del Ray and Jared Leto, both in Gucci (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Ariana Grande in Vera Wang (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Ariana Grande in Vera Wang (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Migos in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Migos in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Nicki Minaj in Oscar de la Renta (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Nicki Minaj in Oscar de la Renta (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Chadwick Boseman in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Chadwick Boseman in Versace (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images)

Donatella (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images) Versace

Donatella (Photo Courtesy of Shutterstock Images) Versace

Do you think religion has a place in fashion? Let us hear what you think.

 

The Fashion Circus Begins: Men’s Fall 2018 Collections Kick Off

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

 

Loewe Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

Loewe Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

The New Year has just begun and the fashion show hamster wheel is spinning faster than ever.  The Men’s Fall/Winter 2018 season kicked off in London where a number of New York editors missed the shows due to blizzard conditions. Then in was off to Florence for Pitti Uomo, a chic affair showcasing some of the most dandy and chicest menswear collections in Europe; meanwhile, Milan offered plenty of bold, cutting edge trends. Although both London and Milan have shortened their show schedules, there was still plenty of great fashion to see, including all the co-ed shows, which just may become runway’s future.

Paris is winding down, but the biggest news out of the fashion capital was the announcement that Kim Jones, the Men’s Artistic Director for Louis Vuitton since 2011, is leaving the company. Jones presented his final show for Louis Vuitton on Thursday and received a standing ovation as he walked side by side with supermodels Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss. Now that’s making an exit!

But now the guessing game begins, who will replace Jones and where will Jones end up next?

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Although the season is still going strong, here are a few key menswear trends so far:

LOGOMANIA

Logo’s are back and better than ever. The logo craze was first reserved for accessories, but today, companies are branding their names on everything from intarsia knits to fur coats (hello Fendi).

Fendi Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iceberg Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Iceberg Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

UTALITARIAN

It’s a throwback to the nineties, as utilitarian inspired looks ruled the runways from London to Paris.

Rick Owens Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Rick Owens Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Belstaff Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Belstaff Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Craig Green Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Craig Green Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

TAILOR MADE

Suit-Up. Sharp, tailored suits made their mark on the runway as the classic looks take a modern turn, complete with ties and all.

Giorgio Armani Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Giorgio Armani Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

GOOD SPORT

The athleisure trend is still going strong as streetwear inspired looks continue to take center stage.

Off-White Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Off-White Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Stella McCartney Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

Stella McCartney Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

 

FIT TO PRINT

Designers are playing mix-and-match this season as head to toe prints are making a splash.

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Missoni Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Missoni Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Vivienne Westwood Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Vivienne Westwood Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Pringle of Scotland Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

Pringle of Scotland Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

 

BRAVE THE COLD

Terrific outerwear was all over the runway, but one of the key outerwear trends were shearling jackets that were effortless yet cozy.

Brunello Cucinelli Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Brunello Cucinelli Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Dsquared2 Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dsquared2 Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Tods Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Tods Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Band of Outsiders Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

Band of Outsiders Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

 

 TELL US, WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MENSWEAR TREND THIS SEASON?

75th Annual Golden Globes – More Than Just Another Award Show

- - Trends
America Ferrera in custom Christian Siriano, Natalie Portman in Dior Haute Couture, Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

America Ferrera in custom Christian Siriano, Natalie Portman in Dior Haute Couture, Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

Hollywood A-listers have long used their fame to promote individual causes, whether political, ethnic or humanitarian. But at this year’s 75th Annual Golden Globes, most all of the attending actors and actresses stood unified in a sea of black (or wore Time’s Up pins). Dressing in black resulted in a powerful solidarity statement, lending support to the ” Time’s Up”  and “Me To” movements and those who so courageously continue to speak out against sexual harassment and female inequality. The  days of watching award shows solely for the fashion are démodé, or are they?  Clothes at award shows are now more important than ever!  Oprah Winfrey’s Cecil B. DeMille AwardAward speech said it all : “a new day is on the horizon!”

From left Reese Witherspoon, Eva Longoria, Salma Hayek and Ashley Judd arrive at the awards

Side by side with Hollywood heavyweights stood female activists such as Monica Ramirez, a campaigner who fights sexual violence against farmworkers and Billie Jean King, the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association, whom Emma Stone portrays in Battle of the Sexes.

Oprah Winfrey  giving her Cecil B DeMille Award

Oprah Winfrey giving her Cecil B DeMille Award speech

While many celebrities dazzled on the stage, the red carpet was filled with fashion drama. Here are some of the biggest trends of the night: (All photos courtesy of Shutterstock).

THE NEW SUIT

Gal Gadot  in Tom Ford

Gal Gadot in Tom Ford

Maggie Gyllenhaal in Monse

Maggie Gyllenhaal in Monse

Alexis Bledel in Oscar de la Renta

Alexis Bledel in Oscar de la Renta

Allison Brie in Vassilis Zoulias

Allison Brie in Vassilis Zoulias

 

 BOWS

Margot Robbie in Gucci

Margot Robbie in Gucci

 

Tracee Ellis Ross in Marc Jacobs

Tracee Ellis Ross in Marc Jacobs

Emilia Clarke in Miu Miu

Emilia Clarke in Miu Miu

 

MIDAS TOUCH

Dakota Johnson in Gucci

Dakota Johnson in Gucci

 

Saoirse Ronan in Atelier Versace

Saoirse Ronan in Atelier Versace
Mary J. Blige in Custom Alberta Ferretti

Mary J. Blige in custom Alberta Ferretti

Kelly Clarkson in Christian Siriano

Kelly Clarkson in Christian Siriano

 

COVERED UP

Elisabeth Moss in Dior Haute Couture

Elisabeth Moss in Dior Haute Couture

Salma Hayek in Balenciaga

Salma Hayek in Balenciaga

Angelina Jolie in Atelier Versace

Angelina Jolie in Atelier Versace

 

Isabelle Huppert in Chloé

Isabelle Huppert in Chloé

 

PLUNGING NECKLINES

Issa Rae in Prabal Gurung

Issa Rae in Prabal Gurung

Kate Hudson in Valentino Haute Couture

Kate Hudson in Valentino Haute Couture

 

Golden Globes 2018: Every Look on the Red Carpet

COLD SHOULDER

Reese Witherspoon in Zac Posen at the Golden-Globes-2018

Reese Witherspoon in Zac Posen at the Golden-Globes-2018

Tarana Burke and Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton

Tarana Burke and Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton

Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton andBillie Jean King

Emma Stone in Louis Vuitton and Billie Jean King

 

Meryl Streep in custom Vera Wang and Ai Jen Poo

Meryl Streep in custom Vera Wang and Ai Jen Poo

Greta Gerwig in Oscar de la Renta

Greta Gerwig in Oscar de la Renta

 

SHORT

Millie Bobby Brown in Calvin Klein by Appointment and Repossi jewelry

Millie Bobby Brown in Calvin Klein by Appointment and Repossi jewelry

Kendall Jenner in Giambattista Valli Haute Couture

Kendall Jenner in Giambattista Valli Haute Couture

Halle Berry in Zuhair Murad

Halle Berry in Zuhair Murad

Heidi Klum in Ashi Studio

Heidi Klum in Ashi Studio

 

NOT YOUR BASIC TUXEDO

Noah Schnapp in Balmain

Noah Schnapp in Balmain

Golden Globes 2018: Every Look on the Red Carpet

James Franco in Salvatore Ferragamo and Dave Franco in Saint Laurent

James Franco in Salvatore Ferragamo and Dave Franco in Saint Laurent

Nick Jones in Versace

Nick Jonas in Versace

 

Winners of the night included:

MOVIES

Best motion picture, drama: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy: “Lady Bird”

Best actress in a motion picture, drama: Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best actor in a motion picture, drama: Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Best actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy: James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”

Best actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy: Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

Best supporting actor, any motion picture: Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best supporting actress, any motion picture: Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

Best director: Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”

Best screenplay: Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

TELEVISION

Best television series, drama: “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best television series, musical or comedy: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Best limited series or motion picture made for television:”Big Little Lies”

Best actress in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”

Best actor in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Ewan McGregor, “Fargo”

Best actress in a television series, drama: Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best actor in a television series, drama: Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”

Best actress in a television series, musical or comedy: Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

Best actor in a television series, musical or comedy: Aziz Ansari, “Master of None”

Best supporting actor in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Alexander Skarsgård, “Big Little Lies”

Best supporting actress in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Laura Dern, “Big Little Lies”

TELL US, WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE LOOK OF THE NIGHT? AND, SHOULD OPRAH RUN FOR PRESIDENT?