University of Fashion Blog

Posts Tagged: "Simone Rocha"

SHAMROCK STYLE: A LOOK AT IRELAND’S FASHION LEGENDS THROUGH THE DECADES

Couturier Sybil Connolly photographed at the launch of her US collection in June 1953. (Photo Credit: Irish Independent)

March is not only known as Woman’s History Month, but it is Irish American Heritage Month as well. So, it is only fitting on St. Patrick’s Day, to pay homage to Ireland’s rich cultural heritage, including its vibrant contributions to the fashion world. From the traditional craftsmanship of tweed and lace to the avant-garde designs of contemporary couturiers, Irish fashion designers have left an indelible mark on the industry.

As we honor Ireland’s rich cultural heritage, let’s also take a moment to salute the visionary designers who have helped to put Irish fashion on the map. From the timeless elegance of Sybil Connolly to the avant-garde creations of Simone Rocha, their contributions to the world of fashion will continue to inspire generations to come. So, whether you’re donning a piece of Irish knitwear or a bold statement hat, let’s tip a beer to the creativity, innovation, and style of Ireland’s fashion legends. Sláinte!

Join UOF as we take a journey through the decades to explore the legacy of some of Ireland’s most influential fashion icons.

SYBIL CONNOLLY: DUBLIN’S DIOR

A look by Sybil Connolly. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

No discussion of Irish fashion would be complete without mentioning Sybil Connolly, often referred to as Dublin’s Dior. Connolly gained international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s for her exquisite couture creations, which often featured traditional Irish textiles like handwoven tweed and delicate lace. Her designs were celebrated for their romantic elegance and attention to detail, earning her a devoted clientele that included Jacqueline Kennedy and Elizabeth Taylor.

IRENE GILBERT: PIONEER OF IRISH FASHION

A selection of Irene Gilbert’s designs on display at the Little Museum of Dublin. (Photo Credit: Little Museum of Dublin)

Irene Gilbert was another true pioneer of Irish fashion, breaking boundaries and challenging conventions throughout her career. Gilbert became Ireland’s first ever couturier and the first woman to successfully run a fashion business in Ireland in 1947. She was known for dressing high society ladies throughout Ireland, as well as Grace Kelly. She will forever be known as the Irish designer who helped pave the way for Irish fashion designers.

NEILLI MULCAHY: HAUTE COUTURE

Designer Neillí Mulcahy at work. (Photo Credit: Little Museum of Dublin)

Neilli Mulcahy ran an haute couture salon in Dublin from 1951 to 1970 and was known for her bold use of color and extensive use of local materials such as linen, poplin and printed wool, but specifically tweed for evening wear. Along with fashion designers Ib Jorgensen, Irene Gilbert and Clodagh Kennedy, she founded the Irish Haute Couture Group to promote Irish fashion in the U.S..

SIMONE ROCHA: A MODERN VISIONARY

Looks from Simone Rocha’s Fall 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Harper’s Bazaar)

Simone Rocha has emerged as one of the most exciting voices in contemporary fashion, blending elements of Irish tradition with a distinctly modern sensibility. Since launching her eponymous label in 2010, Rocha has garnered widespread acclaim for her romantic yet rebellious designs, which often feature delicate embroidery, voluminous silhouettes, and unexpected twists on femininity. Her ability to seamlessly blend the old with the new has cemented her status as a true fashion visionary.

ORLA KIELY: QUEEN OF PRINTS

Orla Kiely and her playful bags. (Photo Credit: The Times)

Orla Kiely’s bold prints and retro-inspired designs have made her a household name in the world of fashion. Since founding her label in the late 1990s, Kiely has become known for her playful yet sophisticated aesthetic, which often draws inspiration from mid-century modernism and vintage motifs. Her iconic stem print, in particular, has become synonymous with her brand and has been featured on everything from handbags to home goods.

PHILLIP TRACY: MASTER MILLINER

Naomi Campbell modeling Philip Treacy’s iconic butterfly hat. (Photo Credit: Vanity Fair)

Phillip Treacy is not only one of Ireland’s most celebrated fashion designers but also one of the world’s foremost milliners. Known for his whimsical and avant-garde approach to hat design, Treacy has created iconic headpieces for everyone from royalty to pop stars. His sculptural creations push the boundaries of traditional millinery, transforming hats into works of art that defy convention and captivate the imagination. Camilla Parker wore a Philip Treacy hat at her wedding with Prince Charles in 2005. He’s also created hats for some f the most iconic women including Madonna, Lady Gaga, Princess Beatrice of York, Victoria Posh Beckham, Isabella Blow and Sarah Jessica Parker. Treacy has also created runway hats for Alexander McQueen, Marc Jacobs, and Valentino, to name just a few.

JW ANDERSON: REDEFINING FASHION

A look by JW Anderson’s Fall 2024 Collection. (Photo Credit: Lauchmetrics)

Joathan Anderson has earned a reputation as one of the fashion industry’s most innovative and boundary-pushing designers for his label JW Anderson. Born in Northern Ireland, Anderson has become known for his gender-fluid designs and eclectic aesthetic, which often combines elements of British and Irish heritage with a modern twist. His eponymous label has garnered critical acclaim for its bold silhouettes, unexpected fabric combinations, and subversive approach to fashion.

LOUISE KENNEDY: TIMELESS ELEGANCE

Various looks from Louise Kennedy. (Photo Credit: Forbes)

Louise Kennedy is synonymous with timeless elegance, thanks to her sophisticated designs and impeccable tailoring. Since launching her label in the 1980s, Kennedy has dressed everyone from royalty to Hollywood stars, earning a reputation for her classic yet contemporary aesthetic. Her luxurious creations often feature clean lines, luxurious fabrics, and subtle embellishments, embodying the epitome of understated glamour. In 2013, Kennedy was called the “uncrowned queen of Irish fashion”.

SINEAD O’DWYER: PUSHING BOUNDARIES

Looks from Sinead O’Dwyer’s Fall 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Yahoo)

Sinead O’Dwyer is a rising star in the world of fashion, known for her boundary-pushing designs and commitment to inclusivity. O’Dwyer’s work often challenges traditional notions of beauty and body ideals, celebrating diversity and self-expression. Through her experimental use of materials and avant-garde silhouettes, she seeks to challenge the status quo and redefine the parameters of fashion.

PAUL COSTELLOE: FASHION ROYALTY

Princess Diana wearing a Paul Costelloe suit. (Photo Credit: ncweb)

With a career spanning over five decades, Paul Costelloe is a true Irish fashion legend. Known for his exquisite tailoring and timeless designs, Costelloe has dressed everyone from Princess Diana, Laura Whitmore, Vogue Williams and Binky Felstead. His eponymous label embodies the essence of classic elegance, with a modern twist, earning him a loyal following around the world.

So, tell us, which Irish designers have inspired you?

Haute Couture Renaissance: Spring 2024 Collections

- - Fashion Shows

Looks from Chanel’s Spring 2024 haute couture fashion show. (Photo Credit: Su Shan Leong)

In a world marked by fast fashion and fleeting trends, the magnificent realm of haute couture stands as a beacon of unwavering elegance and artisanal excellence. The term “haute couture” itself invokes images of meticulous craftsmanship, exquisite fabrics, and runway shows that transcend mere fashion, evolving into wearable art. As we navigate the ever-changing landscape of style, one cannot help but ponder the relevance of haute couture today and acknowledge its enduring mark on the fashion industry.

Looks from Valentino’s Spring 2024 haute couture fashion show. (Photo Credit: The Impression)

The  words “haute couture” translates to “high sewing” in French, and this meticulous craftsmanship is at the heart of what makes it so unique and relevant. Unlike ready-to-wear collections that cater to mass markets, haute couture is a celebration of bespoke tailoring, where garments are meticulously crafted by skilled artisans to fit the individual client’s body like a second skin. This dedication to perfection ensures that each piece is not merely clothing but a work of art, an embodiment of the designer’s vision, and a testament to the client’s personality.

One might argue that haute couture is an anachronism in our fast-paced, digitally driven world, but it is precisely this anachronism that makes it so significant. In an era dominated by immediacy, haute couture is a reminder that true artistry takes time. The months spent handcrafting a single gown, the attention to every minute detail, and the emphasis on quality over quantity are a stark departure from the disposable nature of contemporary fashion. Haute couture embodies a philosophy of mindful consumption and an appreciation for the art of slow fashion.

Looks from Fendi’s Spring 2024 haute couture fashion show. (Photo Credit: CNN)

Beyond its intrinsic value, haute couture serves as the laboratory of innovation for the fashion industry. Designers who partake in this rarefied world push the boundaries of creativity, experimenting with avant-garde techniques, materials, and designs that often find their way into more accessible fashion later on. The runway shows become a visual symphony, where designers collaborate with skilled artisans, photographers, and makeup artists to create a mesmerizing experience that transcends the mere display of garments and produce some of THE most amazing social media images. Many of these posts are suitable for framing.

Looks from Robert Wun’s Spring 2024 haute couture fashion show. (Photo Credit: People)

The allure of haute couture extends beyond its aesthetic splendor. It is a powerful storyteller, reflecting the spirit of its time. Designers often draw inspiration from cultural, historical, or social influences, using their collections to make powerful statements or challenge conventional norms. Haute couture is a canvas for self-expression, allowing designers to weave narratives that resonate with the collective consciousness.

Furthermore, haute couture plays a pivotal role in sustaining traditional craftsmanship. In an era where technology threatens to replace skilled artisans with machines, haute couture remains a sanctuary for the preservation of age-old techniques. The ateliers are a haven for master embroiderers, seamstresses, and tailors whose expertise has been honed through generations. By investing in these crafts, haute couture ensures the survival of skills that might otherwise be lost in the relentless march of progress.

Kris Jenner, Kim Kardashian and Kylie Jenner are seen arriving at the Maison Margiela Fashion show. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

And while Haute couture was filled with celebrity sightings such as Zendaya, Jennifer Lopez, the Kardashian and Jenner clan, Rihanna, and Natalie Portman to name a few, the stars did not outshine the triumphant return of Haute Couture at its best.

Looks from Christian Dior’s Spring 2024 haute couture fashion show. (Photo Credit: LVMH)

Of course, there were plenty of beautifully crafted pieces such as airy chiffon and tweed at Chanel, and Dior’s quiet luxury extravaganza. But there were a few shows that really broke the mold and pushed boundaries, that we are highlighting below:

MAISON MARGIELA

Video of Maison Margiela Haute Couture Spring Summer 2024 Collection. Video Courtesy of YouTube FF Channel.

John Galliano is a master at storytelling and for his Maison Margiela Couture Spring 2024 collection, the maestro turned out one of the most celebrated and emotional couture collections for the luxury fashion house to date. The show had it all, theatrical, rebellious, and oh so sexy. According to the house notes —it started with Brassai’s 1920s and ’30s portraits of the night-time underbelly of Paris’s clubs and streets.

This dark yet sexy inspiration turned into a dramatic work of art in Galliano’s hand. The extremely creative designer created a collection filled with extreme corsetry, padded hips, and erotically sheer lace dresses, paired with wildly imaginative hair, chiffon-masked makeup, and eerie doll-like body-modifications. “Galliano also created some scandalous hourglass dresses there was pubic hair to be seen through tulle and lace (they were merkins on underwear, but still bound to stir up a storm)” according to Vogue.

This certainly will be one show that will be praised for years to come as one of Galliano’s best and most theatrical for the House of Mason Margiela. And after years of Quiet Luxury fashion, we are all ready for dramatic fashion again.

SCHIAPARELLI

Video of Schiaparelli Haute Couture Spring Summer 2024 Collection.  Video Courtesy of YouTube FF Channel.

In a galaxy far, far away….. Daniel Roseberry had ignited the Schiaparelli house into one of the most sought out brands in only a few short seasons, and for his Spring 2024 Couture Collection, he did not disappoint his A-List fans. His Sci-Fi meets Western-inspired collection came complete with a robot baby and all.

Roseberry looked to both the future and the past for inspiration. The creative director for Schiaparelli melded retro technology, classic sci-fi movies and a nod to his Texan childhood. He created an exquisite exoskeleton dresses and an entire 3D spine inspired by both Elsa Schiaparelli’s radical 1938 skeleton dress and Giger aliens from the Alien movie series. “Dressage braids” inspired the knots on a cream leather suit that nearly looked like it could have been a space uniform from NASA and let’s not forget the nestling robot baby on a model’s hip – she was wearing a white singlet and conceptual couture cargo pants—Roseberry’s tribute to Sigourney Weaver as Ripley. “I’ve watched the Alien series, like, six times,” he said in a backstage interview with Vogue.

As for Roseberry Texas roots, there were silver-tipped Western belt buckles which formed a corset, an intricate embroidered jacket with fringe detail, and let’s not forget the horse-tail gown that Zendaya rocked at the show.

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER

Video of Gaultier by Simone Rocha Haute Couture Spring Summer 2024 Collection. Video Courtesy of YouTube FF Channel.

All eyes are on the Maison Jean Paul Gaultier as the illustrious designer, Simone Rocha takes the helm for the Haute Couture Spring 2024 show, a mesmerizing fusion of two visionary forces.

Simone Rocha, renowned for her poetic designs that seamlessly blend tradition and modernity, steps into the spotlight, bringing her signature ethereal touch to the hallowed halls of Gaultier.

The show opens with a flourish of cascading ruffles, paying homage to Gaultier’s bold and irreverent spirit. The juxtaposition of Rocha’s signature pearl embellishments against Gaultier’s iconic Breton stripes creates a visual symphony that resonates with both innovation and tradition. As each model glides down the runway, the fusion of these two design philosophies becomes a harmonious celebration of fashion’s ever-evolving tapestry.

The collection was filled with Gaultier-inspired pink cross-laced satin corsetry, and paid tribute to the house classics, turning his Breton stripes into a t-shirt made entirely of ribbons and bows.

Rocha also created exquisite haute couture ballgown—romantic-ballerina shapes made from layers and layers of tulle. It was a magnificent show that won the audience over—and according to Vogue, Rocha received a giant hug from Monsieur Gaultier himself.

So, tell us, what was your favorite haute couture show this season?

A RIOT OF EXPERIMENTAL ELEGANCE: LONDON FASHION WEEK SS/2024

- - Fashion Shows

Backstage at Susan Fang’s Spring 2024 Show. This dress was made from 600 handcrafted bead trees. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

While quiet luxury ruled the New York runways, London Fashion Week offered the exact opposite – eccentric elegance and avant-garde fun. London Fashion Week has always been a playground for designers who dare to defy convention and LFW Spring 2024 was no exception. In fact, we witnessed a sensational surge in experimental fashion that pushed the limits of imagination. The London shows took place from September 15th to the 19th and it was clear from the start that this season was going to be all about taking risks, celebrating the bizarre, and embracing the unconventional. Runways came alive with avant-garde designs, pushing the boundaries of what’s considered fashion. Leading the charge were some of the industry’s most iconic names. Let’s dive in:

BREAKING THE MOLD

The genesis of JW Anderson’s Spring 2024 collection was inspired by the humble yet powerful medium of clay. Yes, I said clay. Jonathan Anderson, found himself captivated by the malleability of clay, its capacity for transformation, and the inherent connection it bears to the human touch. In his collection, Anderson endeavored to capture the essence of clay, showcasing its versatility, sensuousness, and raw beauty through every piece. Case in point, a variety of looks that looked as though they were molded from Play-Doh — and they sort of were. Created out of plasticine, a British label of modelling clay, Anderson’s creations were stiff, lumpy, and totally camp. Almost like looking at a model wearing a cartoon.

A look from JW Anderson’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

ETHEREAL ROMANCE MEETS THE AVANT-GARDE

Simone Rocha’s Spring 2024 collection was a triumph of ethereal romanticism intertwined with experimental fashion. The runway was a dreamscape of whimsical silhouettes and intricate detailing. Rocha merged bold fabrics and textures, combining lace, tulle, and leather in unexpected ways.

One unforgettable piece was a voluminous tulle gown adorned with cascading floral appliqués. It was as if the models had stepped out of a fairytale and onto the runway. Simone Rocha reminded us that experimental fashion can be soft, romantic, and utterly enchanting – embellished Crocs and all.

A look from Simone Rocha’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

THE CLASH OF HERITAGE AND FUTURISM

At Burberry, Creative Director Daniel Lee (this is his sophomore collection for the heritage brand) took the concept of experimental fashion to a new level. The collection was a vibrant blend of heritage and futurism, as models walked down the runway in reimagined trench coats. Models strutted tailored coats with low slung belts and Lee’s updated Burberry Prorsum ‘knight on horseback’ logo, one that is deconstructed and taken apart – the pattern consists of images of metal carabiner clips in the shape of the knight’s horse and heavy-duty silver chains. The Spring 2024 collection was a perfect balance of elevated grunge and classic Brit appeal that is the signature of Burberry.

A look from Burberry’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

ELEGANCE REDFINED

Richard Quinn’s Spring 2024 collection was an extravaganza of excess and opulence. The show, held at the Grand London Ballroom, was an ode to the designer’s late father and stayed true to Quinn’s signature creations, as models walked the runway draped in lush fabrics, feathers, and sequins, creating an atmosphere of grandeur. The collection took a pensive tone with regal opera gloves, exaggerated collars, and cage dresses in both mourning blacks and angelic off-whites. Supermodel Jessica Stam closed the show in an embellished bridal jumpsuit, signaling that even in grief, there is love. Quinn’s collection proved that experimental fashion can be a celebration of the extraordinary.

A look from Richard Quinn’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

HERITAGE MEETS SUBVERSION

Chopova Lowena’s Spring 2024 collection was a masterful blend of heritage and subversion. Models wore garments that juxtaposed traditional textiles with unconventional design elements. The design duo, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena-Irons, merged tough skate culture with frilly folkloric dreams creating a gothic girlie look that was superb. Case in point, a delicate lace collared jacket paired with a black lace dress and leather studded accessories, symbolizing the collision of old-world charm and modern edge. Chopova Lowena’s collection was a testament to the beauty of contrasts in fashion.

A look from Chopova Lowena’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

THAT’S A WRAP

As the curtain fell on London Fashion Week Spring 2024, these British designers left an indelible mark on the fashion world. Their experimental creations challenged norms, pushed boundaries, and celebrated the art of self-expression through clothing. In the grand tapestry of fashion, they remind us that it’s the rule-breakers and innovators who propel the industry into exciting new territories, ensuring that fashion remains a vibrant, ever-evolving art form. Oh, and it looked like they were having lots of fun doing it!

Looks from KWK by Kay Kwok’s Spring 2024 Show. (Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

So tell us, are you embracing the NY quiet luxury trend or London’s experimental fashion?

VIRAL MOMENTS AT LONDON FASHION WEEK FALL 2023

- - Fashion Shows

Looks from Nensi Dojaka’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acielle StyleDuMonde)

It’s a wrap. London Fashion Week had one of its strongest seasons in years. In pure British style, the 5-day world-wind (Feb 17 – 21) combined a funeral, an awards show, the ‘coming out’ of Kate and William, designer debuts and some really great fashion shows. Held twice a year, London Fashion Week (LFW) is one of the most prestigious events in the fashion industry, showcasing the latest creations of some of the world’s most talented designers. LFW has been a major part of the global fashion calendar for over three decades and this year it became a British lollapalooza!

But first some history: London Fashion Week was first established in 1984, organized by the British Fashion Council (BFC) as a response to the dominance of Paris and Milan in the fashion world. The event was initially held in a West London car park, and featured just a handful of British designers, such as Jasper Conran and Betty Jackson. Over the years, London Fashion Week grew in popularity and stature, attracting a wider range of designers and international attention. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, it became a platform for emerging talent, with designers like Alexander McQueen and Stella McCartney making their debuts. In 2009, London Fashion Week was merged with the London Fashion Weekender, a consumer-focused event that allowed members of the public to see fashion shows and buy clothes directly from designers. This move aimed to make fashion more accessible and inclusive to a wider audience.

In recent years, London Fashion Week has continued to evolve and innovate. It has embraced new technologies, such as live-streaming and social media, to reach a global audience (which was extremely useful during COVID-19 lockdowns). It has also become a major platform for sustainable and ethical fashion, with many designers using environmentally-friendly materials and production processes.

Looks from Erdem’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acielle StyleDuMonde)

LFW now attracts thousands of visitors from around the world, including industry professionals, journalists, celebrities, and fashion enthusiasts. It remains an important event in the global fashion calendar, showcasing the creativity and diversity of British fashion.

A FUNERAL

Left To Right: Kate Moss, Helen Bonham Carter, Victoria Beckham, and Will Young all attended the late Vivienne Westwood’s memorial service. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)London Fashion Week kicked off in a somber mood as prominent guests in the fashion world gathered to pay their final respects at the funeral of the late Dame Vivienne Westwood which took place on Thursday 16 February at Southwark Cathedral in London. The funeral was a star-studded event where actress Helena Bonham Carter delivered the eulogy and Chrissie Hynde performed. The Cathedral was packed with Westwood’s family and friends as well as plenty of fashion industry guests included Marc Jacobs, Kate Moss, Tracey Emin, Victoria Beckham, Paul Smith, Zandra Rhodes, Bella Freud, Stephen Jones, Matty Bovan, and Ellen von Unwerth. Many guests paid tribute to the late Westwood as they followed one of Westwood’s many mottos, “When in doubt, dress up!” And dressed up they were, as they streamed into the Gothic cathedral in their finery to pay their final respects to the pioneering designer and activist, who died Dec. 29 at age 81.

AN AWARDS SHOW & A ROYAL PDA MOMENT 

Kate Middleton’s cheeky gesture to Prince William as they walk the BAFTAs red carpet. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The Prince and Princess of Wales had a rare PDA Moment (public display of affection) at the BAFTAs (British Academy of Film & Television Award), which took place on Sunday, February 19th. The royals made sure to hold hands while walking down the red carpet and at one point the Princess playfully tapped William’s lower back as the paparazzi went wild. Princess Kate, who is a master at high-low dressing, looked stunning in a reworked Grecian Alexander McQueen gown (which she first debuted at the 2019 BAFTAs), paired with black gloves, and a pair of Zara earrings.

DESIGNER DEBUTS & HIGH BROW FASHION SHOWS 

A look from Burberry’s Fall 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Daniel Lee debuted his Burberry collection by sailing into uncharted territory with more terrific color (case in point, cobalt blue) and faux fur than the heritage brand has seen in its 167-year history. Lee’s new vision for the iconic British house came laced with an appropriately cheeky duck motif. “The ducks I just found very British,” he explained backstage after the show to Vogue Magazine. “It made me think of the outdoors, and Burberry is an outdoors brand. It reminded me of rain, and protection.” After all, raincoats are in the brand’s DNA.

Looks from S.S.Daley’s Fall 2022 Collection, Right, Sir Ian McKellen. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

S.S. Daley’s collection for Steven Stokey-Daley was pure theatre. For Daley’s menswear show, he enlisted British actor Sir Ian McKellen (Shakespeare, popular fantasy and science fiction), who opened the show reading a poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (of Ulysses and The Charge of the Light Brigade fame), a wildly unexpected surprise. AND OH SO HIGH-BROW!

A look from Simone Rocha’s Fall 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Inspired by Lughnasadh, an Irish harvest festival with pagan origins, designer Simone Rocha turned her presentation into a ritual. The designer created beautiful lace gowns and crinolines that were stuffed with raffia.

A look from Dilara Findikoglu’s Fall 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: GoRunway)

Turkish designer Dilara Findikoglu staged a fashion show entitled “Not a Man’s Territory,” which she stated came together after the arrest and death of Mahsa Amini in Iran late last year. The finale creation was Joan of Arc reincarnated, she told Vogue in an interview, “She’s coming back for revenge, dresses as she wants. And she has her knives.”

Looks from JW Anderson’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acielle StyleDuMonde)

This season Jonathan Anderson was inspired by the Scottish dancer/choreographer Michael Clark. Looking through Clark’s archive, Anderson decided he needed to look through his own archives as well. The result, a collection that brings together costume details from Clark’s performances mixed with details from early JW Anderson collections. Overall, it was a cosmic dancer delight.

Looks from Christopher Kane’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Glamsquad)

Christopher Kane sent out a series of slinky jersey dresses, printed with hyperrealistic images of piglets, rats, and chicks – talk about animal magnetism.

Florence Pugh modeling a look from Harris Reed’s Fall 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Launchmetrics)

Florence Pugh knows how to make an entrance. So, who better than the bona fide red carpet star herself to open Harris Reed’s theatrical Fall 2023 show? The actress wore a harlequin sequin skirt with a thigh-high slit, a black corset top and a massive halo headpiece. Pugh set the tone for the event with a speech written by Reed about the transformative power of clothes. “In a sometimes judgmental world, our costumes can change who we want to be seen as, and who we are destined to be,” she said. “I invite you to embrace the lamé and sequins of life, because all the world’s a stage.” Reed offered ten beautifully detailed looks dripping in sartorial theatrics.

So tell us, what was your favorite moment from London Fashion Week?

SPRING 2023 SHOWS: LONDON MOURNS THEIR QUEEN BUT THE SHOWS MUST GO ON

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

 

Erdem’s show finale felt like a page being inscribed in the annals of British fashion history. This was a tribute to the Queen. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

London Fashion Week’s Spring 2023 season was like no other. England’s longest reigning monarch passed away on Sept. 8, at Balmoral Castle, plunging the nation into 10 days of official mourning. Queen Elizabeth II was 96 years old when she passed and ruled Britain 70 years. As per the Queen’s wishes, Prince Charles became King Charles III, as he promises to walk in his mother’s footsteps.

The Final Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. (Photo Credit: Ranald Mackechnie, Courtesy of Buckingham Palace)

Shows were scheduled to begin September 15th and end on September20th, but major brands like Burberry chose to cancel their show altogether, and some wondered if fashion week would — or should — happen at all. But of course, the shows forged on as many designers paid their respects to her Royal Majesty.

On Sunday night, Sept. 18th — the eve of the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II — the line of people waiting to pay their last respects to the late monarch stretched so far through the heart of the British capital that it could be seen from space, according to The New York Times. The following morning, September 19, the queen’s state funeral took place at Westminster Abbey; then a legion of military officers towed her casket through the streets of London in a processional to Windsor Castle. Naturally, it was all very touching — from the little tantrums to the unbelievable crowds to the mournful bongs of Big Ben that backdropped the funeral march. Queen Elizabeth II is now at her final resting place which is marked with a new ledger stone in the King George VI Memorial chapel, Buckingham Palace has said. The stone slab bears the name of the late Queen, her husband Prince Philip, and her parents, with the two generations separated by a metal garter star.

While Britain is also a country with a national identity forged in times of heartache and trouble — of which there recently has been plenty for designers: the continuing fallout from Brexit, the pandemic, and the likelihood of recession. Out of respect for the Queen, all of the parties this season had been canceled, but many young designers rallied for their shows to go on. And thankfully they did, because London Fashion Week always serves up such inspirational fashion moments.

A look from JW Anderson’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Ayesha Kazim for The New York Times)

“It has been a challenging two years,” Harris Reed said in an interview with The New York Times. “Speaking with my fellow young designers, most of whom have put their entire brand budgets into shows to bring in sales and brand awareness, it is so important, now more than ever, to support the small brands in London.”

A look from Harris Reed’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

London has a reputation for embracing and nurturing young fashion talent, and this season there were a number of breakthrough emerging designers, such as Chopova Lowena and Karoline Vitto; but the fashion old guard also reminded us of why the capital’s fashion reputation also rests on the rich depth of its storytelling. And while London Fashion Week was filled with emotion, fashion designers proudly honored their Queen.

Looks from SimoneRocha’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Acielle)

A look from Chopova Lowena’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Here are a few of the biggest trends that came out of London Fashion Week:

PAYING TRIBUTE TO THE QUEEN (ELIZABETH NOT ALEXANDER)

A number of British designers paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II in their collections. Case in point, designer JW Anderson, whose finale was a black T-shirt with the words “Her Majesty The Queen 1926-2022 Thank you” on the front.

“It felt important to keep going, because this is a time when London needs to stick together, and right now some of this city’s young designers are at risk of losing their businesses,” JW Anderson said to New York Times reporters backstage, as revelers outside drank the night away. “That is an extremely British attitude.”

Here are a few other designers who honored the Queen this season.

JW Anderson, who fought to keep London Fashion Week alive in the midst of unprecedented “royal mourning,” ended his London Fashion Week show with six lovely words. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

A silent catwalk with the Union Jack wrapped tight around the heart at Dilara Findikoglu’s Spring Show. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)Traditional lace collars and black netted crowns took the spotlight at Richard Quinn, whose 2018 fashion show was attended by Queen Elizabeth II herself. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Tiny crochet corgi dolls became a key accessory at RuiRui’s show. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The speakers went silent at the show for Halpern’s opening look, which paid homage to the 1957 ballgown the Queen wore to greet French president Charles de Gaulle. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Great Britain, ultra tiny dress. The Union Jack rises at Poster Girl’s Spring Show. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

Bora Aksu’s show opened with a military drum salute before turning into a parade of looks inspired partly by the Queen’s military service in World War II. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

DOT ON

We will all be seeing spots this season as designers offered the playful graphic print on everything from dramatic suits to frothy frocks.

A look from Richard Quinn’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Molly Goddard’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Harris Reed’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Bora Aksu’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Halpern’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

CUT-IT-OUT

The sexy cut-out trend is going strong for spring especially in sultry gowns that will surly get you noticed at your next bash.

A look from Nensi Dojaka’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Halpern’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from JW Anderson’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from David Koma’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A-ROUND-WE-GO

Bubble shapes are all the rage this spring 2023 season. From futuristic spear-shaped hemlines to rounded peplum shapes, these dramatic objects add a playful flare to your wardrobe.

A look from Richard Quinn’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from JW Anderson’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Harris Reed’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Dilara Findikoglu’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

YOUR NOT SO BASIC TEE

Everyone’s favorite basic gets a quirky make-over this spring. And what timing! Just as UoF is about to launch an entire series on drafting cut & sew T-shirts and 4-way stretch knits!

A look from Christopher Kane’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Dilara Findikoglu’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Molly Goddard’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from JW Anderson’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

TRAINING DAY

Add some drama to your next affair with floor-sweeping trains. Whether you opt for the minimal slip dress version or a maximalist feathered skirt, these dramatic hemlines are oh so sexy.

A look from Harris Reed’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Halpern’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Erdem’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from David Koma’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

FEELING FROU

Frothy, romantic ruffles were all over the runways during London Fashion Week.

A look from Molly Goddard’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Halpern’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Erdem’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Bora Aksu’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Simone Rocha’s Spring 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

So tell us, what is your favorite spring 2023 trend so far?

 

IT’S SHOWTIME: LONDON AND MILAN FALL 2022 TRENDS

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

Looks from Richard Quinn’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Just as Covid cases in some parts of the world are declining and restrictions are loosening, Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine. The world watched in horror, as his deadly attack began in the early morning hours of February 24th. NATO has issued sanctions on Russia, but will they be enough to stop this escalating war? The world hopes so. Because if the last few years have taught humanity anything, it’s that in the grand scheme of things, we are nothing without health and peace.

As we try and navigate these troubling times, we can look to fashion as an escape from reality and to transform us into a world of fantasy. Last week UoF covered New York Fashion Week and this time we’ve crossed the pond to the London and Milan shows. Though our eyes may be focused on fashion…our hearts are definitely with the Ukrainian people.

SWINGING LONDON

Looks from Erdem’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

London Fashion week was a jam packed 5-day event that took place from Friday, February 18th to Tuesday, February 22nd. As we have come to accept, the fall 2022 season was a hybrid of physical shows as well as digital presentations, but thanks to England’s ease on Covid restrictions, the buzz around fashion week was the return of the IRL fashion show and events throughout the city. There were 86 physical womenswear and menswear shows and 61 digital presentations, which ranged from the well-established labels such as Vivienne Westwood, to emerging brands such as the breakout star of the week Nensi Dojaka.

Looks from Nensi Dojaka’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Here are a few of the hottest trends that emerged from London Fashion Week:

SHEER FACTOR

London based designers had nothing to hide this fall 2022 season as they played up the transparency theme – from the utterly see-through to the subtly sheer.

A look from Supriya Lele’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Simone Rocha’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Maximilian’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Temperley London’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Nensi Dojaka’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

VELVET UNDERGROUND

Opulence filled the fall 2022 runways this season with luscious velvets in simple cocktail dresses, dramatic coats, and dramatic gowns.

A look from Simone Rocha’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Edward Crutchley’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Paul & Joe’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

A look from 16Arlington’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Temperley London’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

THE EIGHTIES SHOW

This season, designers dug deep into the archives and pulled out bright colors and body-conscious silhouettes. Even the ‘pouf’, circa 80s Christian Lacroix, made a comeback!

A look from Emilia Wickstead’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from David Koma’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Richard Quinn’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Molly Goddard’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Simone Rocha’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Huishan Zhang’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

MANY SPLENDORED STRINGS

The collections were awash in a myriad of fabulous fringe motifs, perfect for the latter-day flapper ready to dance the night away.

A look from Halpern’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

A look from Christopher Kane’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Conner Ives’ Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Erdem’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Roksanda’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

Looks from Ozwald Boateng’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

IN FULL PLUME

Birds of a feather flock together, but if you want to break out as the next street style star, then bring on the feathers. The fall 2022 runways in London were filled with feathery looks that can be worn from day to night.

A look from Huishan Zhang’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from 16Arlington’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Paul & Joe’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

A look from Poster Girl’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

A look from Aadnevik’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Imaxtree)

A look from Richard Quinn’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

CIAO MILANO

A backstage look from Moschino’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Although London lifted many of its Covid restrictions, Italy still has many restrictions in place, and will remain so until at least March 31. Only those who are fully vaccinated will be able to attend Milan Fashion Week, which began on Tuesday, February 22nd and ends Monday, February 28th.

The good news, Milan had a jam-packed schedule with plenty of physical runway shows and events. There were also plenty of fun events throughout the week such as Gucci’s all-day celebration of its new Gucci Vault, The World of Vogue Talents and the CNMI Sustainable Fashion Awards, both celebrated emerging designers and those who have taken extra steps to curb their impact on the planet.

So while Milan Fashion Week is still going strong, here are some of the emerging trends from the first half of the week:

BOUDOIR FLAIRE

Innerwear as outerwear continues to intrigue designers in Milan who showed a variety of lingerie inspired looks on the runway.

A look from Prada’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Fendi’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Sportmax’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from No. 21’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Blumarine’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Gucci’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

VISUAL EFFECTS

Fall’s graphic content turned towards eye-popping geometrics with a hint of op art.

A look from Max Mara’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Emporio Armani’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Missoni’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Prada’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

CAPE CRUSADERS

Remarkable outerwear stole the show during Milan Fashion Week, but the true breakout style were all the terrific capes that ran the gamut from dainty evening versions to cozy yet chic toppers.

A look from Gucci’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Moschino’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Raf Simons’ Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Tod’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Roberto Cavalli’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

YARN IT ALL

Miles beyond your basic sweater, a wonderful tactile world of dresses, cardigans and coats await. Perfect for braving the cold.

A look from Blumarine’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Etro’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Tod’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Max Mara’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

SHORT STORIES

No one does seductive as well as the Italians and for fall, designers showed barely there mini dresses and skirts all over the runway.

A look from Dundas’ Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Etro’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Emporio Armani’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Missoni’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from No. 21’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

POINT OF HUE

Designers tempered their dark, wintery palette with a celebration of pastel colors, making the fall 2022 season a joyful rhapsody of hue.

A look from Fendi’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Sunnei’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from MM6 Maison Margiela’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Diesel’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Del Core’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway)

A look from Blumarine’s Fall 2022 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue Runway

So tell us, what are your favorite runway trends so far for the fall 2022 season?

 

 

 

 

AFFORDING LUXURY: THE ART OF DESIGNER AND MASS RETAIL COLLABORATIONS

Looks from Simone Rocha X H&M Collection. (Photo Credit: H&M)

Let’s face it, fashionistas everywhere crave designer clothing, but many cannot afford the hefty price tags that are often associated with luxury fashion brands. So how can luxury houses satisfy the desires of the working-class fashionista? Through collaborations of course! Overall, designer collaborations are well-received, highly sort after, and especially difficult to get your hands on before they sell out. Thanks to marketing and retail success, the number of designer collaborations have hit the roof in recent years, and with the help of celebrity fans, it’s not hard to see why these pieces are in such high demand.

An advertisement for Halston for JCPenney. (Photo Credit: JCPenney)

Collab History

Halston can be attributed to creating the very first mass-market collaboration in 1983 between his namesake label and JCPenney. Halston was a successful, disco-era designer who was known for his minimalist yet glamourous aesthetic; as well as his infamous Studio 54 days where he partied with and dressed close friends Liza Minnelli, Bianca Jagger, and countless others. Halston created the controversial, cheaper Halston III line with department store giant JCPenney but the collaboration was was poorly received by elite department stores, such as Bergdorf Goodman, which stopped carrying the high-end Halston Limited label out of fear that the JCPenney collab would cheapen Halston’s overall appeal.

An advertisement for Isaac Mizrahi for Target. (Photo Credit: Target)

In 2002, Isaac Mizrahi, who was known for his vibrant and playful joie de vie collections, teamed up with Target. The Isaac Mizrahi x Target partnership was the first and longest-running Target designer collaboration (lasting from 2002-2008), and it introduced the designer to mainstream America. The extremely lucrative collaboration bolstered the designer’s own career with the collection eventually including accessories, bedding, housewares and even pet products. This collaboration kick started the luxury designer mass market craze.

An advertisement for Karl Lagerfeld for H&M. (Photo Credit: H&M)

Swiss retail giant H&M jumped on the designer collaboration bandwagon in 2004 with the legendary Karl Lagerfeld. Known for his sleek black suits, skinny jeans and French rock and roll spirit, despite skeptics, the collection sold out within minutes of the launch. This wildly successful partnership opened the door for a plethora of high-end H&M collaborations to follow and set the precedent for numerous future high-street and designer collaborations.

Once the success of these collabs were made known, the flood gates were opened. Here are a few noteworthy mentions:

Giambattista Valli for H&M in 2019

Virgil Abloh, the creative director of Off-White, partnered with multiple brands ranging from Evian and Rimowa to Ikea and Nike.

Christopher Kane X Topshop in 2006 and Crocs x Christopher Kane Spring 2017

Rodarte x Universal Standard in 2019

Lanvin x H&M in 2010

Missoni x Target in 2011

Balmain x H&M in 2015

SOME OF THE COOLEST COLLABORATIONS OF 2021

SIMONE ROCHA X H&M

A video of the Simone Rocha X H&M collaboration.

The Simone Rocha X H&M collection launched on March 11th to  rave reviews. The Swiss retail giant and the Irish designer, collaborated on a collection that was based off Rocha’s archival hits filled with charming and whimsical pieces. Sustainability is said to be a key factor in this new designer collaboration. Rocha told Vogue US that, coming from a much smaller brand, H&M’s footprint was a big consideration, and that together they were able to source organic cotton, recycled polyester and a new compostable yarn.

Simone Rocha’s house codes are strong and were fully incorporated into her collaboration with H&M. There were plenty of neo-classical references, puffed sleeves and babydoll silhouettes, Lurex tweed, Broderie Anglaise, organza and cloqué fabrics, lots of embroidery, beading and even baroque pearls. It was all so delightfully sweet.

TARGET’S TRIO

Just in time for the warmer weather, Target is bringing back the Designer Dress Collection for spring 2021. This season the retailer is collaborating with three diverse designers: Alexis, Christopher John Rogers, and Rixo. The rising stars are adding their signature styles to Target, offering a much-needed boost to a girl’s closet. There will be over 70 styles available, ranging in price from $40-60 in sizes XXS—4X, making this Target’s most size-inclusive designer capsule to date.

A look from ALEXIS’ collaboration with Target. (Photo Credit: Target)

The Miami-based label Alexis, designed by Alexis Barbara Isaias, is known for its relaxed, feminine silhouettes made for the globetrotter, bringing a wanderlust feel to easy dresses and separates. Her Cuban roots and Miami upbringing definitely influence her free-spirited collections. In an interview with The New York Post, Isaias stated, “I never wanted a design office in New York. The vibrant colors, the culture, the feeling … it’s so important that our roots are in Miami.” And while Isaias loves the nightlife, her Miami is also made up of quiet moments in nature. “To me, it’s a place for family, for connections — to be by the water and feel the breeze. There’s just something in the air here.”

A look from Christopher John Roberts collaboration with Target. (Photo Credit: Target)

Christopher John Rogers shot to stardom when Vice President Kamala Harris wore his coat and dress to her and Joe Biden’s inauguration on January 20, 2021. The young industry darling is known for his unparalleled eye for color, voluminous silhouettes, and sharp tailoring. In only a few seasons he has already earned a CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award and a legion of fans, including Zendaya, Lizzo, Tracee Ellis Ross and Michelle Obama.

In an interview with Teen Vogue, Rogers was asked how his background influences his style. Rogers stated, “I’m African-American, and I grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which is basically a large small town. I was fortunate enough to have my parents put me in art classes pretty early on, at the suggestion of my grandmother, and I was always surrounded by people of various backgrounds. My best friends in elementary school were Korean, Jewish, South American, you name it. I’ve always known variety to be standard.”

A look from Rixo’s collaboration with Target. (Photo Credit: Target)

UK-based Rixo, designed by Orlagh McCloskey and Henrietta Rix, bring a modern twist to vintage-inspired wrap dresses and patterns. The contemporary label evokes a Bohemian & free spirit, with easy-to-wear pieces in feminine shapes and high-quality materials.  The young design duo are known for their fusion of original hand-painted prints and timeless silhouettes that flatter all body types.

According to the brand’s profile, Henrietta & Orlagh met at University of Arts London, where on their first day enrolling as students Henrietta complimented Orlagh on her vintage handbag and the rest is history! Imminently discovering a mutual love for vintage, the pair have been best friends ever since and have also lived together through their first 5 years of Rixo – becoming more like sisters than friends.

JW ANDERSON X UNIQLO

Looks from JW Anderson x Uniqlo collaboration. (Photo Credit: Uniqlo)

Jonathan Anderson has been keeping busy the last few months. In addition to designing for his eponymous British label JW Anderson and for Spanish fashion brand Loewe, he has created a capsule collection for the Japanese mega retailer Uniqlo.

For his latest JW Anderson x Uniqlo collab, Anderson focused his attention on designing items that he would like to wear when the world fully opens up again. “I wanted something that was a bit crisp and subtle,” he says in an interview with Refinery 29. “I always think you have to subtly get back into things.” To help shoppers transition out of the sweatpants they’ve been living in for more than a year and into the forthcoming season, he also “wanted [to create] something that felt timeless.”

For the spring capsule he created boxy T-shirts hemmed with chain stitches; oversized, linen polo shirts; and baseball caps made of vintage-looking denim and detailed with embroidered daisies. To fully round out spring’s lineup of essentials, he also included chambray dresses, smocked midi skirts, and rigid denim in light blue and oatmeal.

Anderson says that he’s become “very obsessed with handcraft.” Craftcore-esque chain stitches and embroidery, therefore, became mainstays throughout the collection. “I love the subtlety of detail,” he says. “It doesn’t have to be so loud in the very beginning.”

So tell us, which fashion collaborations would you like to see?

LONDON AND MILAN SPRING 2021 FASHION SHOWS TAKE THE PLUNGE

- - Fashion Shows

Bora Aksu’s Spring 2021 Presentation. (Photo: Courtesy of Bora Aksu)

ON WITH THE SHOW!

While New York showed only a handful of live shows and presentations due to Covid concerns, at London and Milan fashion week it was almost business as usual. London designers staged over 30 live shows, presentations, fashion events or personal appointments, while Milan blended 28 physical shows with 24 digital ones, making Milan, thus far, the city with the most in real life showings. As American buyers, the  fashion press (and the rest of us) virtually crossed the pond for London and Milan fashion week, we all got to watch some pretty amazing spring 2021 fashion in the privacy of our home, sitting on our pandemic-safe couch. Gotta love technology!

LONDON’S CALLING

A look from Gareth Pugh’s Spring 2021 Collection. (Photo: Courtesy of Gareth Pugh)

Stating that all live events would adhere to social distancing and hygiene g regulations, the British Fashion Council kicked off LFW on September 17th and wrapped up on September 22. Burberry opened the season with a live-streamed outdoor show to rave reviews. Throughout the week 80 designers took part in London Fashion Week – 30 IRL (in real life) and 50 digitally.

The week hosted a mix of womenswear and menswear designers, but what really stood out was that the season will no longer be known as Spring 2021, but rather “London Fashion Week September 2020,” in a move towards a more season-less approach.

Here are the highlights:

BURBERRY

Riccardo Tisci opened London Fashion Week with a bang. The influential designer live-streamed his Burberry show in a hauntingly beautiful forest. His theme: “a love story between a mermaid and a shark.” The dark theme was the perfect parable as to how we’ve all felt the past seven months locked in quarantine and working from home. Tisci’s under-the-sea analogy was anything but kitsch. The collection was rather chic and sophisticated with beautiful shades of blues; “Blue is the new beige,” Tisci teased in an interview with Vogue Runway, name-checking Burberry’s signature color.

Being in quarantine with his 92 year-old mother and relatives in his childhood home near Lake Cuomo was a breath of fresh air for the designer and gave him a new sense of appreciation for life. According to his Vogue interview, the rootsy surroundings of his quarantine made him reconnect with his childhood and the innocent mindset with which he pursued those dreams. “You open the drawer of your past and see how far you’ve gone as a person, how much you’ve done for yourself, and for others. Your dreams have come true,” he reflected.

His collection for Burberry was filled with sea-centric references – from illustrations to embellishments – that were innocent and raw. Tisci’s shark motif has been a signature of the designer from the start of his career. As for his mermaids, Tisci worked with peplum shapes, glistening dresses, and spliced trench coats.

Tisci perfectly infused Burberry’s classic aesthetic with his signature street-style. Sometimes, going back to your roots is what a designer needs to find their footing again, as his mother would say, Bravo Riccardo!

DURO OLOWU

A look from Duro Olowu’s presentation. (Photo Credit: Luis Monteiro for Duro Olowu)

There is no doubt about it, 2020 will forever be known as the year of the sweatsuit. But as  Duro Olowu puts it quite simply in an interview with Vogue Runway, “Ease doesn’t have to mean track pants.”

Olowu presented his collection to a handful of editors and buyers in his London boutique. The joyful collection was filled with bold colors and striking prints that were inspired by Emma Amos, an African American painter who died in May of this year. Olowu infused bold hand-painted striped prints that were chic and sophisticated, case in point, the elongated tunic over wide leg pants, gave off an elegant loungewear vibe.

The designer is also experimenting with new shapes, focusing on sarong-like midi-length silhouettes that feel fresh and new. His line-up was filled with 1950s lean looks that were refined yet youthful. These clothes are a promise to brighter days ahead and they definitely will put a smile on your face.

MOLLY GODDARD

A look from Molly Goddard’s Spring 2021 Collection. (Photo Credit: Ben Broomfield for Molly Goddard)

Molly Goddard held intimate appointments in her studio as she presented her eclectic spring collection filled with bright, frothy, tulle confections. Mannequins were scattered throughout the space, each wearing one on Goddard’s jubilant looks. The collection was filled with ruffled, voluminous skirts and dresses, all in vibrant colors, as well as checkerboard neon sweaters, an A-line anorak dress and even floral printed denim pants.

Also, for the first time, Goddard decided to offer many of her unique dresses in white, which would make the perfect wedding dress for the cool young bride who wants an anything but traditional dress.

SIMONE ROCHA

A look from Simone Rocha’s spring 2021 collection. (Photo: Courtesy of Simone Rocha)

With all the COVID-19 U.K. regulations set in place, Simone Rocha held an intimate presentation at the Hauser & Wirth gallery. The cavernous white walls were the perfect backdrop for Rocha’s beautifully, intricate looks to come to life. In an interview with Vogue Runway, Rocha stated “I’m not going to lie: I’ll be the first to say I love runway shows, now that the pace of shows has been stripped away, I wanted to find a space to represent that. It’s important to me to find a way to physically share the collection, just for the silhouette, texture, and weight of it. Clothes are made of cloth, and emotions, and they come to life on a body.”

Rocha’s collection was filled with voluminous, rounded shapes in gilded brocades, rich cotton embroideries, delicate pearl embroideries, and intricate scalloped edge cottons. Close up, the layers held little messages: on tulle veiling, patterns of castles; in the broderie anglaise, SR monograms. “Castles in faraway places,” Rocha laughed. “I think that’s the escapism we’re all craving.”

ERDEM

Just like Riccardo Tisci for Burberry, Erdem Moralioglu was inspired by fantasy for his spring 2021 collection and also opted to hold an audience-less runway show in the English forest. Moralioglu spent his quarantine time reading. His collection was inspired by a Susan Sontag novel, The Volcano Lover, Sontag’s portrait of the 18th-century beauty Emma Hamilton who married a volcanologist obsessed with Grecian vases and had a passionate love affair with Lord Nelson.

Moralioglu, like his inspiration, looked to beauty during this fearful time. The designer featured regal 18th century-inspired floral jacquard dresses with puff-sleeves juxtaposed against cozy cardigans, military-inspired outerwear and an embroidered admiral jacket.

In an interview with Vogue Runway, Moralioglu stated, “I get asked the same question: Are women’s tastes and wants changing now, given the situation? On the contrary, we have a customer who’s still buying special pieces. It’s the want for something you can wear in five and 10 years. As I enter my 15th year doing this, the most thrilling thing is seeing someone wearing your work from 10 years ago. I’ve always been obsessed with permanence. When it feels like the end of the world, doesn’t someone need a pink moiré hand-embroidered gown?”

CHRISTOPHER KANE

An abstract painterly look from Christopher Kane. (Photo: Courtesy of Chrisopher Kane)

If this pandemic has taught us anything (other than the importance of wearing a mask, frequent hand-washing and social distancing) it’s a time for reflection, a reminder not to put off things that bring you joy. Christopher Kane did just that in his spring 2021 collection. The designer revisited his love of painting using multicolored glitter that he experimented with as a kid. Kane’s flagship store was turned into an exhibition space for his collection presentation, with easels and canvases featuring his paintings that he’d created during lockdown.

As for the clothes, which were displayed on mannequins, Kane recreated his artwork onto coats, dresses, and tops. Key looks included a brushstroke print long sleeve midi dress, a paint dot splatter shirt, and a brush-stroke striped sweater. With this charming collection one thing is clear, Kane had a lot of fun creating these pieces.

 

 

MILANO MODA

Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring 2021 patchwork show was inspired by Sicily. (Photo Credit: Gorunway.com)

Leave it to the Italians to add a new word to fashion’s lexicon. Milan’s Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana billed the city’s spring 2021 shows as a “phygital fashion week.” Phygital fashion week is a portmanteau, a blend of physical, in person shows, and a digital show, a format that has become essential during COVID.  Milan’s phygital fashion week took place from September 22 – 28th.

Everyone in the fashion community is asking themselves…is this hybrid model of phygital shows and presentations the future of fashion week? Only time will tell.

PRADA

Prada was hands-down the most anticipated show of the season and rightfully so, since this was the debut of the Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons collaboration. The partnership was announced last February, pre-pandemic lockdown, and it was probably the most celebrated fashion news of 2020. The designers staged a digital runway show that was viewed on Prada.com and then opened up to a conversation with Prada and Simons answering questions that were submitted online. It was a genius move, giving Prada consumers the chance to listen to their “backstage-conversation.”

As for the clothes, a new Prada ‘uniform’ was introduced. You may remember that in the ‘90s Prada’s minimalistic uniform looks launched Miuccia Prada into fashion stardom. According to Miuccia and Simmons, the new Prada is all about paring back and the streamlining of excesses to get at what’s essential. The collection’s 40 looks were composed of long, narrow trousers; a sleeveless, tunic-length tee with the famous triangle logo; statement making outerwear with clutched coats; full skirts; holey (not the religious kind) knits; all worn with pointy-toed slingback kitten heels in a contrasting color. “How Miuccia dresses is very often a kind of uniform one way or another, and that was direct inspiration for me for the show,” Simons said in the interview.

The collection was filled with past references that became signatures for both designers. Case in point, Prada’s spring 1996 show of “ugly prints” reemerged on hoodies and matching full skirts, as well words and graphic silk-screened motifs on pastel shift dresses, a representation of Simmons’ personal work.

Miuccia and Simons lived up to the fashion world’s anticipation and thus far was the show of the season.

FENDI

Fendi opened Milan Fashion Week with the first in-person, live, runway show, featuring both their men’s and women’s collections. And the fashion crowd couldn’t be happier. The show opened with photographic prints taken by Silvia Venturini Fendi from her bedroom window during lockdown. These soft graphic prints were found on everything from transparent shirt dresses, to tailored blazers and men’s suits.

As Italy was the first of the European cities to suffer from Covid 19, spending several months in lock-down mode, Fendi believes this will forever change the way we dress, and answered the call with sophisticated alternatives for WFH (work-from-home) looks. The collection had plenty of chic loungewear and pajama fashion, as well as floaty wood-printed caftans. Fendi closed the show with bedding-inspired looks that ranged from cozy satin quilted outerwear to pale lace embroidered linen tops and skirts. “This reminded me of Karl [Lagerfeld],” said Fendi pre-show in an interview with Vogue Runaway: “He had a love for bed linen, he had a big collection.”

This collection marked the final transition of Silvia’s decades long collaboration with Karl Lagerfeld, and her latest collaboration with newly appointed creative director Kim Jones. This announcement will surely make Fendi the most anticipated show for the Fall 2022.

ETRO

Etro’s Spring 2021 Show. (Photo Credit: Gorunway.com)

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a difficult and terrifying time for us all, but if there is any silver lining to this nightmare, it is that the lockdowns have brought many families back together. This is the case for Veronica Etro, as she spent her time during lockdown at home with her mom as they listened to old Neapolitan songs, “we were bewitched by the serenity, the timelessness, and the elegance” Veronica Etro stated during her pre-show press conference. The music made her reminisce about her “2019 trip to Ischia, Capri, Naples, and Positano, and—maybe because we were so patriotic during that period—I thought, okay, let’s make the collection all about Italy.”

Veronica dug deep into her family’s print archives and turned out a youthful and vibrant collection filled with effortless vacation looks that ranged from a sexy scarf print bikini worn under a glamorous open front maxi skirt, to charming marinière knits. There were plenty of effortlessly chic printed dresses; flirty nautical themed bra tops and shorts; as well as youthful paisley shorts worn with menswear inspired shirts.

This charming collection was the perfect beach escape for next summer and beyond.

ALBERTA FERRETTI

A look from Alberta Ferretti’s Spring 2021 Show. (Photo Credit: Corunway.com)

Alberta Ferretti also opted for a live, in-person show this season, as she held her runway extravaganza in the open air in one of the courtyards of Milan’s Castello Sforzesco, as guests enjoyed the sunshine. The perfect backdrop to Ferretti’s signature romantic aesthetic.

The collection was a stark contrast to the state of the world. In a pre-interview with Vogue Runway, Ferretti stated, “In this difficult situation, so harsh and unforgiving in many ways, my gut instinct was to embrace kindness and a certain seductive softness. I believe that it stems from self-confidence and from the acceptance of the natural power of femininity.

Ferretti’s approach to the season was practical, as she offered her women a wardrobe that fits all of their needs. The designer showed a variety of feminine dresses that ranged from ethereal, flowing, maxi dresses to flirty macramé lace mini dresses – all with a bohemian yet sophisticated hand. The collection also featured plenty of every-day pieces, such as pastel denim pants, high-waisted fitted trousers paired with bralettes, embroidered tops and cropped blouses. Overall, Ferretti’s collection was a sophisticated and fresh approach to femininity.

VERSACE

Always with a flair for the dramatic, Donatella Versace literally took her viewers “under the sea” for her spring 2021 collection: the aquatic theme being a reoccurring motif for many designers this season. Versace staged a full on live-streamed show, with no audience, just her team. The runway’s backdrop…the imagined ruins of Atlantis with a water current streaming down its projected walls. The mythical backdrop was the perfect setting for Versace’s provocative ocean-themed collection.

Ever since the Versace label launched in 1978, by her beloved brother Gianni, the brand has always been known for its sex appeal and its loud and vibrant prints and colors. For spring 2021, Donatella embraced the DNA of the house and it was a joyful ode to life, featuring both menswear and womenswear looks. Versace started off with a maritime motif with tailored navy blazers and shorts. Then the collection took on a Malibu Barbie twist, with vibrant prints in pumped-up colors. Starfish print dresses that ranged from sheaths to baby-doll silhouettes; coral reef motif and ocean themes made their way onto everything, from skirts and tops to shorts and swimwear. Versace also showed moments of ingenuity with micro-pleated dresses trimmed with twirly ruffles, which resembled a graceful jellyfish swimming in the ocean.

Versace stated that her archival sea collection was also a metaphor for a new world of wonders, which translated to a diverse runway. The co-ed show was cast with a variety of ethnicities, as well as diversified sizes, embracing her message of body positivity and gender-nonconformity. Brava Donatella for such an inclusive representation of the world.

MOSCHINO

Let’s give it up to Jeremy Scott for producing the most creative show of the season. The digital masterpiece was an elaborate puppet show with marionette replicas of his favorite models walking down a runway and doll replications of his audience. It was a visual delight that eased the stress of a world gone mad. In an interview with Vogue Runway, Scott stated,  “The best thing I could do for everyone who’s stressed about the election, the pandemic, social unrest, and the future was to give the gift of fantasy and take us away from all of it for a few minutes; let us enjoy this little fashion world of ours.”

Scott’s whimsical show may have come at a huge expense, but it was a much needed spectacular visual experience. As for the clothes, they were each re-proportioned to fit the dimensions of the marionettes without losing their authentic properties. The collection was an homage to haute couture and brought Scott’s masterful construction to the forefront of the collection, case in point, a cocktail dress that was sliced open, revealing another dress under it with a photograph of an inside-out embroidered dress. Other key looks included a feather trim gown with an exposed bone corseted bust, deconstructed cocktail dresses, as well as spliced outerwear.

When asked if fashion is still relevant, Scott  stated “People are like, ‘Sweatpants forever!’ But I love exciting things that are one-of-a-kind and refined. We’re all desperate for that. I constantly kept getting dressed up every day even if I wasn’t seeing people. It’s part of who I am.” The London and Milan shows seemed to prove that point.

So far it looks like NYFW, LFW and MFW are all channeling happier times. Reminds us of the old 1920s song by Jack Yellen & Milton Ager, Happy Days Are Here Again, became the the theme song of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Presidential campaign in 1932 and is still played at Democratic conventions today.

So tell us, do you have a fav collection?

LONDON CALLING – THE BEST OF LONDON FASHION WEEK SS/2019

- - Fashion Shows
Queen Elizabeth watches Richard Quinn's show with Anna Wintour at London Fashion Week Fall 2018  CREDIT AFP

Queen Elizabeth watches Richard Quinn’s show with Anna Wintour at London Fashion Week Fall 2018 CREDIT AFP

London Fashion Week, founded by the British Fashion Council in 1983, has definitely established itself as one of the most creative and avant-garde fashion cities in the world. Known for showcasing a mixture of emerging designers and established brands – this season was no exception. Who could forget last season when Her Majesty The Queen sat front row at Richard Quinn? While that moment may be hard to top, there were plenty of exciting moments at LFW SS/2019. From Riccardo Tisci’s debut collection for Burberry to Victoria Beckham’s ten year anniversary show and everything in between. Oh, and let’s not forget that all of London’s runways are now fur free! Here are some outstanding moments and trends from the week.

A NEW ERA AT BURBERRY

Riccardo Tisci is ushering a new day at Burberry – his debut show was not only the most anticipated show of London Fashion Week, but possibly of the whole spring season in general. For the past 5 months, ever since Burberry announced Christopher Bailey’s departure and Tisci as his replacement, the fashion industry has been obsessed with how Tisci might put his mark on the brand. Well, just as Hedi Slimane changed the iconic YSL logo and the company name to Saint Laurent, Tisci began by changing the Burberry logo -it is now a “TB” monogram (the initials of founder Thomas Burberry.) And, for the first time ever, Burberry is now fur-free – thanks to Tisci.

Using the tried and true formula for revamping a heritage brand, by hiring new, young, hot talent, (Virgil Abloh and Nicolas Ghesquière/Louis Vuitton, Hedi Slimane/Dior/Saint Laurent/Celine, Raf Simons/Dior/Calvin Klein), Burberry is counting on Tisci to reinvigorate the label and give it the star-studded colt following that he successfully achieved at Givenchy. So, imagine everyone’s surprise when industry insiders took their seats at Monday evening’s show and discovered that there was not a single celebrity in sight (except for Kendall Jenner on the runway). When Samantha Conti of WWD asked Tisci why he opted for a ‘celebrity free zone,’ Tisci replied, “The [guests] are all people I know and they’re very good friends, so for this first season it was very important for me to really work with the people in the business: the fashion journalists, buyers, friends and family. Celebrities can sometimes give the wrong message and I don’t really like using them as windows.”

What a breadth of fresh air! No distractions, just beautiful and wearable fashion. Check out the full show using the link below:

https://youtu.be/qWsz-tvXQXQ

Naming the collection “Kingdom,” Tisci told Vogue’s Sarah Mower, “It’s like a patchwork or a mix of the British lifestyle.” He wants to dress all generations, “The mother and the daughter, the father and the son.” It was Tisci’s vision of British culture from Punk to Establishment. Could he have been channeling Ralph Lauren a bit here?

Tisci opened his show with a Heritage Trench. This time, buttoned-up and cinched at the waist with a thick elasticized belt. He continued to send out versions of trench coats throughout the show, for both men and women. His menswear looks were  polished, with perfectly tailored suits, sleek knits and terrific outerwear. For women, Tisci introduced eveningwear – minimal, simple, long black jersey dresses, with just a hint of sparkle that were oh so chic and refined. For day, Tisci showed smart, sophisticated looks: bow blouses, printed silk dresses, tailored suits and polo shirts. And of course, there were plenty of Burberry’s signature plaid. Let’s not forget, Tisci was one of the first designers to make street-style – high fashion and he didn’t disappoint. In the mix were anoraks, biker-inspired leather skirt suits, rain ponchos, and utility shirts most notably a pop culture print—echoing a Sex Pistols song—that read,  “why did they kill Bambi?”

After all the hype and anticipation, Tisci delivered a smart collection that pushed the boundaries of Burberry just enough, while at the same time was commercially safe. After all, these are clothes that are meant to be worn in the real world, right?

Burberry's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Burberry’s spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.comS

VICTORIA BECKHAM’S 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

Victoria Beckham Tenth Anniversary T-shirt image (Photo Courtesy of Victoria Beckham)

Victoria Beckham Tenth Anniversary T-shirt image (Photo Courtesy of Victoria Beckham)

Happy Anniversary Victoria Beckham!  To celebrate her 10 years in business, Beckham decided to celebrate in her native country. To kick off the celebration, she recreated the famous  T-shirt that Marc Jacobs masterminded a decade ago, featuring Beckham coming out of a shopping bag, a symbol of her journey as a fashion designer. Juergen Teller shot a brilliant ad campaign for the anniversary and limited edition tees can be found on Beckham’s website.

Beckham opened the show with non-other than 90s fashion icon Stella Tennant – wearing an effortless white pantsuit paired with a silk and lace lingerie-inspired top – the epitome of 90s cool. This look is the perfect example of why Beckham has transitioned so easily from a Spice Girl to a serious designer – her clothes are ageless, timeless, elegant, chic, and yet appeal to Millennials, Gen Zs and fashionable woman of every age.

The 90s theme rang throughout the collection but with a refined hand. There were plenty of ‘dresses-over-trouser’ looks that were polished and that had a posh edge. Beckham showed a variety of perfectly fitting slim trousers, tailored blazers, delicate lace tops and sexy knits with handkerchief hems. These were real clothes that real woman can wear. Beckham is a fashion force to be reckoned with and has definitely hit a chord with fashionable women around the globe.

Victoria Beckham's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Victoria Beckham’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Victoria Beckham's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Victoria Beckham’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

TOP TRENDS OF LONDON FASHION WEEK

VICTORIAN ERA

London is known for its over-the-top fashion and designers here like to have fun on the runway. One of the biggest trends of the week was a modern day take on Victorian-inspired looks. From Erdem’s tapestry floral dress with exaggerated puffed sleeves to Simone Rocha’s ornate collars. Here are some of our favorite interpretations of this trend.

Erdem's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Erdem’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Simone Rocha's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Simone Rocha’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Mary Katrantzo's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Mary Katrantzo’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

LET THERE BE NEON

LFW was a bright and colorful explosion of neon that will surely be insta-worthy hits.

Roksanda's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Roksanda’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Emilia Wickstead's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Emilia Wickstead’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Pringle of Scotland's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Pringle of Scotland’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ashish's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ashish’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Jenny Packham's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Jenny Packham’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Julien Macdonald's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Julien Macdonald’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

House of Holland's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

House of Holland’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

EARN YOUR STRIPES

Stripes are always a favorite on the runway for Spring, but this season designers infused them with a refreshingly bold new twist.

JW Anderson's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

JW Anderson’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Halpern's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Halpern’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Temperly London's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Temperly London’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chalayan's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chalayan’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Duro Olowu's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Duro Olowu’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

RUFFLED UP

Romance was in the air as flirty ruffles were found on a variety of sexy dresses.

Molly Goddard's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Molly Goddard’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

David Koma's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

David Koma’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Peter Pilotto's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Peter Pilotto’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Richard Quinn's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Richard Quinn’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Delpozo's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Delpozo’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

COLD SHOULDER

Off-the-shoulder numbers are still going strong as designers show plenty of options on the runway.

Osman's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Osman’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christopher Kane's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christopher Kane’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Delpozo's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Delpozo’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Roland Mouret's spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Roland Mouret’s Spring 2019 show (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

GOTTA FAV LOOK FROM LFW? Let us know…..