University of Fashion Blog

Posts Tagged: "Fendi"

WORKING GIRL CHIC RULES THE RUNWAY IN MILAN & PARIS

Saint Laurent (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Saint Laurent (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

It may be the Year of the Pig, according to the Chinese zodiac, but 2019 is turning out to be all about Female Power! Thanks to feminist movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp, and of course the Woman’s March that started as a worldwide protest against Donald Trump the day after his 2017 inauguration (and that has continued every year since), women are taking center stage around the world and demanding equality in every way. In 2018’s U.S. mid-term election, a record 117 women were elected to office. Finally … it looks like the tide has begun to change for women.

Rolling Stone's March  Cover featuring: Jahana Hayes, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Nancy Pelosi, and Ilhan Omar

Rolling Stone’s March Cover featuring: Jahana Hayes, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Nancy Pelosi, and Ilhan Omar

With extraordinary women being elected to powerful positions, designers are stepping up to the plate and creating powerful looks for these new high-profile women. The Fall 2019 collections saw the return of the “Power Suit” (remember your fashion history? Gaultier, Montana and Armani – circa 80s?). And, while the 80s versions consisted of exaggerated shoulder pads, wide belts, slim midi-skirts and bow blouses, all in traditional menswear inspired fabrics and colors, designers are putting a new slant on what a powerful woman in the 21st century should look like. Who could ever forget Melanie Griffith in the 1988 film Working Girl. Every young girl starting her career aspired to be Melanie’s iconic character, Tess McGill. Well, move over Tess, today’s woman is independent, outspoken, confident, diverse, opinionated, political, empowered and socially-conscious. These are the new role models for Millenials, Gen Zers and all those other generations to follow.

Check out Anthony Vaccarello’s collection for Saint Laurent, a 1980s redux, complete with shoulders that extended two whole centimeters beyond the natural shoulder and updated the looks by introducing a neon color palette.

Harrison Ford, Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver in Working Girl

Harrison Ford, Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver in Working Girl

And alas! Thirty years later, the power suit is back, but this time around, the suit is soft and feminine.  According to an interview by Olivia Stren, for FashionMagazine.com (September 17, 2018), designer Joseph Altuzarra stated, “I think that the suit, for a long time, was trying to emulate a menswear staple when women were wearing it to work. It was about hiding your femininity. With so many strong women today embracing a more tailored, feminine pantsuit silhouette, I think it has emerged as a symbol of female empowerment and strength. In our case, the tailoring is always about celebrating femininity and a woman’s strength.” Altuzarra  claims that tailored ‘workwear’ is at the heart of his brand and credits his mother, who clocked in at a bank every morning, as his inspiration.

With “women power” in the air, it was no surprise that power dressing and chic workwear were key trends on the Milan and Paris Fall 2019 runway. While many of the designers who embraced this trend were women, there were a few ‘woke’ men that embraced the movement as well. Namely…Karl Lagerfeld. Although Milan kicked off with the tragic news that Karl Lagerfeld has passed away on February 19th, his legacy lived on in his last collection for Fendi. And you just got the sense that, as always, Karl got the memo – Women Rule.

FENDI

Fendi (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

He used to call me ‘la petite fille triste,” remembered Silvia Venturini Fendi, in an emotional backstage scene at the elegiac Fendi show, the last designed by the late Karl Lagerfeld, whom she first met when she was four years old. “Now is not the time to be sad,” she added, noting that Lagerfeld supervised every look in the focused collection that revealed what she called “those facets of himthe signatures that he had embedded into the brand’s DNA since he first met the quintet of Fendi sisters, including Venturini Fendi’s mother, Anna, in Rome in 1965.” Silvia Fendi stated to Vogue.com.

The collection included plenty of sharp tailoring paired with crisp shirts that added a refined, yet flirty, twist to office dressing.

MAX MARA

Max Mara (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Max Mara (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Who could forget Nancy Pelosi in her Max Mara coat on her way to meet with Donald Trump in December regarding border wall funding – this moment was the inspiration behind creative director Ian Griffiths Fall 2019 Max Mara collection. Ms. Pelosi was front and center on Griffiths’s Fall mood board as he made a strong connection between power and glamour. Griffith played with sharp tailoring, in head to toe monochromatic colors that ranged from soft camel to bold blues.

PRADA

Prada (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

As one of the most politically-articulate designers in the fashion industry, having once been a member of the Italian Communist Party and an ardent feminist, the fear of war and the political turmoil worldwide has been a constant worry on Miuccia Prada’s mind. So, for her Fall collection, the designer was inspired by “romance and fear,” in of all things…a nod to the Bride of Frankenstein. For her romantic girls, Prada showed plenty of delicate lace capes, 3-D floral skirts and glittery red shoes, but these feminine gestures stomped their way into an army of utilitarianism looks that ranged from uniform military jackets to combat boots. The collection embraced the Prada woman; she’s smart, worldly, and understands the turmoil around her, yet she still really loves fashion.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

Salvatore Ferragamo (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Salvatore Ferragamo (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Just days before the show, Salvatore Ferragamo announced Paul Andrew’s promotion to creative director, overseeing all design operations for the company. For Andrew, it all starts with ‘the shoe.’ Case in point, a Ferragamo multicolored patchwork shoe that was created in 1942, which provided the collection’s color palette and patchwork prints. Andrew also showed a more refined side with a chic belted pantsuit and lots of tailored outerwear.

GIORGIO ARMANI

Giorgio Armani  (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Giorgio Armani (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

No one, and I mean no one, does tailoring better than Giorgio Armani. And for his Fall 2019 unisex show, the designer titled his collection “Rhapsody in Blue.” Although the collection was overwhelming dark (a sign of the times?), there were plenty of interesting details. Armani showed jodhpur pants paired with tailored jackets for day, while for evening he created a beaded floral shrunken jacket that was paired with velvet trousers for a relaxed take on eveningwear, as only Armani knows how.

GUCCI

Gucci (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gucci (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Okay, so you see the image of this houndstooth suit and you say, gotta be Chanel right? Well…wrong! It’s Alessandro Michele. Known for his eclectic, magpie collections for Gucci that often blast gender norms and historical mash-ups, for Fall 2019 he delivered a powerful collection filled with the treasured pieces you would find in your grandmother’s closet. With a nod to the 40s, Michele created tailored jackets that were cut to perfection for both men and women, as well as wide leg cropped trousers, Pierrot collar shirts and anything but basic outerwear. While this may have been a tamer Gucci collection, Michele infused plenty of eccentric touches – such as the fetish masks and metal ear coverings.

CHRISTIAN DIOR

Christian Dior (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christian Dior (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Among the designers that have truly taken their causes to the runway is Maria Grazia Chiuri, the creative director for Christian Dior. Season after season Chiuri takes a stand on women’s rights and equality. For Fall 2019, Chiuri channeled Italian conceptual artist Bianca Menna, who in the 1970s signed her work pseudonymously as Tomaso Binga, a man, to cunningly protest male privilege in the art world. The artist read a poem about the promise of a feminist victory at Chiuri’s show. As for the clothes, Chiuri was inspired by England’s “Teddy Girls” – 1950s working class girls who had a love of Rock & Roll and clubbing – as well as Dior’s  optimistic creations of the same time period. The collection was sportswear at its best! Chiuri layered rompers, skirts, coats, trousers and bustiers in a modern and fresh way.

DRIES VAN NOTEN

Dries Van Noten (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dries Van Noten (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dries Van Noten is known for his bold prints and unapologetic use of color, but let’s face it, today’s state of the world is a bit darker so Van Noten turned out a hauntingly beautiful show. While his signature floral prints are traditionally romantic and vibrant, this Fall the floral motif took a somber turn. In an interview with Vogue, Van Noten stated “We picked them from my garden last October and photographed them. I wanted roses but not sweet roses—roses with an edge, roses for now. Flowers can be romantic, but this I wanted to take out, because the times are tougher than in the past. So you see the diseases, the black spot, the imperfections.

Van Noten opened the show with a lineup of polished gray pantsuits, perfect looks for the office (political or business), case in point, a pinstripe belted pantsuit with a matching puffer stole. How incredibly chic! Can you just imagine Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in this?

CHLOE

Chloé (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chloé (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chloé paid a touching tribute to Karl Lagerfeld, the late designer who designed for the house  from 1963 – 1983. When the fashion crowd arrived, they found placed on their seats postcards that featured images of Lagerfeld’s past collections, as well as his own comments about his work. One particular quote from 1975 still resonates today, “The essence of modern dressing—unstructured, weightless, [and] totally feminine.”

Fast forward, forty years later, and this is still the Chloé aesthetic; upscale bohemian in the chicest and most sophisticated way. For her Fall 2019 collection, Natacha Ramsay-Levi found her stride at the house. There were an abundance of breezy but polished dresses that every “It Girl” will crave. Ramsay-Levi paired these effortless frocks with mid-heel boots to complete the effortlessly cool look.

Sure Ramsay-Levi nailed the boho look, but she also showcased her talents as a great tailor with Prince of Wales trousers and skirts, military-inspired trousers and plenty of outerwear,  cut to perfection.

Balmain (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Balmain (Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Meanwhile at Balmain, Olivier Rousteing went full-out 80s biker chic. Big shoulders, biker chains, black leather moto jackets and power suiting on steroids was his vision of the modern woman. But, not so sure about whether this through-back look will help women in today’s day and age like it did in the 80s. What would Nancy Pelosi or RBG say?

So tell us, where do you stand on power-dressing in the 21st century?  

The Magical & Technological World of Couture: Fall 2018

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of W Magazine)

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of W Magazine)

Need an escape from a world filled with political unrest, nuclear threats and terrorism? Enter…haute couture. Yeah, we know covering fashion, especially the world of couture, may seem frivolous to many, but couture is about dreaming, escapism and fantasy. Who wouldn’t want to live right now in a world of beautiful handmade gowns while running through a garden in Paris or engaging in a leisurely walk along the Seine?

But the truth is, couture is so much more than fantasy. Costume and fashion history would not be the same without it and let’s face it… couture is the ultimate marketing machine!

We need only look back in time to a publication written between 1751 and 1772 by Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert entitled Encyclopédie, ou dictionaire raisonné des sciences, des art et des métiers, to see how this pivotal tome gave instructions to the métiers (trades) in the art of dressmaking, forever placing this trade on equal footing with the arts and sciences of the time.

And of course we owe the ‘Father of Couture,’ Englishman Charles Frederick Worth (Paris circa 1856 ), the fashion genius who together with his wife as muse, transformed the world of dressmaking into ‘high fashion’. Over time, the House of Worth, along with other couturières (female) and couturiers (male) were able to take the craft to a whole other level by creating perfumes, shoes, millinery and diffusion lines. These spin-offs planted the seeds which would later become lifestyle branding with lots of marketing hype!

 

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of W Magazine)

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of W Magazine)

We know that these one-of-a kind haute creations come with a hefty price tag. On average, one couture gown can take over 800 hours to create and cost several hundred thousand dollars. Even couture daywear starts at around $10,000! It’s estimated that there are only approximately 2,000 couture clients, mostly from Russia, China, the United States and the Middle East, with fewer than 300 that buy regularly.

So, do the numbers. With only a handful of steady customers, you got it…haute couture is not a money maker. Couture houses spend millions of dollars twice a year, by selecting exquisite fabrics, hand-sewing each garment, employing top métiers for beading and embroideries and producing larger-than-life runway shows, using A list models, hair and make-up teams. The profits are negligible, amounting to less than ten per cent of gross profits for some houses, though most operate at a loss. However, their true value is in the selling of the house’s fragrance, make-up line and other less-expensive branded items like shoes and handbags.

Draping Technique (Photos courtesy of Pinterest)

Draping Technique (Photos courtesy of Pinterest)

So why do these houses still invest in their haute couture collections, other than pushing their ancillary products? They are selling a dream. Fashion shows attract huge media attention and gain enormous publicity for the couture houses. Think about how many actresses wear couture on the red carpet. These designers are selling a dream of chic cachet, beauty, desirability and exclusiveness, that the ordinary person can ‘buy into.’

Here are some highlights of the Haute Couture Fall 2018 Season:

VALENTINO

Pierpaolo Piccioli has been on a role and his Valentino Couture show closed out Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris with rave reviews. This season Piccioli offered a brilliant line-up of rich saturated hues and swaggering proportions. According to Vogue.com, Piccioli stated, “Couture involves a deeper and more intimate perspective, to go further into your own vision of beauty.”  His vision was a perfect blend of Greek Mythology, 17th- and 18th-century painting, the films of Pasolini and the photographs of Deborah Turbeville, medieval armor, and Ziggy Stardust. Whew, that’s quite a line-up of inspiration, eh?

This translated into intricate embroidered capes, a multiple brocade evening dress adorned with rhinestones, sequins and pearls, a red sculpted jersey gown and a trio of featherweight taffeta dresses that wrapped around the body.

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

FENDI

How does a house known for its use of fur adapt to the changing landscape of the anti-fur movement? After all, major fashion houses such as Gucci, Versace and Michael Kors have all announced they would go fur free and use only faux fur in their collections. Fendi on the other hand, made no such promise, but did abandon their Haute Fur Show in favor of a couture show.

Though Fendi did include some fur pieces, what they also did was produce something much more creative than fur and faux fur (which by the way is also a major earth pollutant). They ingeniously manipulated textiles in such a way as to resemble real fur; case in point, a coat created with fine strips of chiffon that were frayed and stitched together so closely that it could have been easily mistaken for an intarsia’d mink. While there were plenty of real fur looks in the line-up, it was refreshing for a house like Fendi show alternatives. And oh, what a great upcycling concept!

Fendi Haute Couture faux fur Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Haute Couture faux fur Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER

Always known to break with tradition, Jean Paul Gaultier showed his haute couture collection on both male and female models as the versatility of the collection was genderless. With a strong emphasis on tailoring, his suits were oh so chic! Gaultier was able to take the iconic “Le Smoking” and update it for the 21st century.

Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

MAISON MARGIELA

John Galliano has now taken to podcasting and for Margiela couture he stated that this is collection is “the raw, raw, undiluted essence, the parfum of the house.” Following in the footsteps of his Artisanal collection for men, Galliano presented a highly innovative, high-concept collection exposing the craftsmanship of haute couture –  literally – by revealing the exquisite stitching that goes into the construction of a hand-tailored jacket. The true genius of Galliano came through by layering garments between tubes of filmy nylon, thus creating what Vogue called “translucent fabric sandwiches.”

“We’re all nomads today,” added Galliano, “. . . we do move in tribes.” Galliano calls it “nomadic glamour.” Reminds us a bit of Yeohlee and her “Urban Nomads” collection, only this time, on steroids!

Maison Margiela Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Maison Margiela Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Maison Margiela Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Maison Margiela Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

ARMANI PRIVE

Ahhhh, and then there was Armani. Known for his master tailoring and Red Carpet artistry, the fall Armani Privé collection didn’t disappoint.  Armani’s press notes noted “A sculptural, almost regal style.”  The first half of the show (there were almost 100 looks in all), was a sea of black and champagne-colored pantsuits and evening looks, all that captured the chic essence of Armani beautifully. However, in an attempt to keep up with the times, half-way through the show Armani switched gears and sent out electric hues in everything from an ostrich feather cape to a hot pink and turquoise pantsuit that was a complete disconnect to the first half of the show. Go Armani!

Armani Prive Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Armani Prive Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Armani Prive Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Armani Prive Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

CHANEL

We fashionistas can always count on Karl Lagerfeld to create a wonderful backdrop for his Chanel collection. And for this collection he did not disappoint by sending his models for stroll along the Seine with its wide sidewalks and low stone walls framing the magnificent Institut de France, built by Louis le Vau for Cardinal Mazarin in the 1660s (and where the Academie Française is housed). Perhaps with age, Lagerfeld is feeling a bit reflective about his first days in Paris as an 18-year old. In an interview with Vogue before the show, Lagerfeld remembered a city still suffering from postwar neglect, with dirty streets and dark, unrestored buildings. “People said to my parents, ‘but he can get lost,’” he added. “My mother knew better: I had a strong survivor instinct!”

The collection was filled with the House’s signature tweeds all in shades of grey. There were plenty of long skirts that unzipped to reveal sexy miniskirts adorned with magnificent embroideries. Lagerfeld also showed a silver foil ball gown skirt, a bevy of chic jackets and plenty of transparent chiffon pleated eveningwear.

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Chanel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

CHRISTIAN DIOR

After years of over the top glamour and in your face sex appeal at Dior, at the hands of Raf Simons and John Galliano, the tide seems to be turning toward a more minimalistic approach to fashion. At the forefront of this evolutionary change is Maria Grazia Chiuri. Her couture 2018 collection involved some feminist research.  She read up on Leonor Fini, one of the avant-garde artists Christian Dior chose to exhibit in the gallery he was involved with before becoming a couturier. The results were beautiful, somber, sculpted and pleated pieces that were way more complex than what met the eye. These were serious clothes. Only a seasoned designer like Chiuri knows how to design clothes, utilizing the talents of finest ‘hands’ in the business, that will attract the most discerning couture clients. Chiuri showed cashmere suits, simple strapless gowns that grazed the ankle, effortless pleated dresses and demure eveningwear.  This collection is timeless and elegant yet modern and refreshing. A hit!

Christian Dior Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christian Dior Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christian Dior Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Christian Dior Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

SONIA RYKIEL

For the past 50 years, the name Sonia Rykiel has been associated with fun, lighthearted knitwear. This season, designer Julie de Libran presented the first Sonia Rykiel couture collection. And, staying true to the Rykiel code, presented a collection with the same joie de vivre that the house’s founder was known for.

Gone from this collection were the traditional evening gowns that epitomize the world of couture. Instead, de Libran presented a youthful and edgy line-up. Looks ranged from a striped hand-beaded off the shoulder Marinière sweater to a black sweater dress with a trompe l’oeil bikini embroidery and a bridal corset look with front-lacing, a feathered knit veil and blue jeans. Surely de Libran is a couture disruptor but is this collection really worthy of being called couture?

Sonia Rykiel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Sonia Rykiel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Sonia Rykiel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Sonia Rykiel Haute Couture Runway Look (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

IRIS VAN HERPEN

Always a fashion renegade, Iris van Herpen decided to show her couture collection at the Galerie de Minérologie et de Géologie, a fitting choice, since the name of this collection was “Ludi Naturae,” translated from Latin, “nature play.”

However, Van Herpen’s idea of nature flirts with synthetic biology through her iconic laser-cutting techniques and 3-D printed illusion fabric innovations, which she has taken to new heights and labels it “syntopia.” To quote van Herpen: “I think we as humans don’t even come close to the intelligence within nature. It’s funny how people think that nature is simple and technology is complex—it’s the opposite; technology is simple and nature is complex.”

Known for her artist collaborations, this time it was Amsterdam-based artist duo Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta of Studio Drift who created the backdrop her runway ‘science fantasy. She also partnered with Dutch sculptor Peter Gentenaar who is known for capturing ‘organic memory’ and motion through his delicate, large-scale cellulose sculptures,  and together they created a show that was ‘other-worldly.’

Considered fashion’s ‘futurist-in-residence,’ couture season would be incomplete without Iris van Herpen and her vision.

Iris van Herpen's Fall 2018 Couture Show (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iris van Herpen’s Fall 2018 Couture Show (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iris van Herpen's Fall 2018 Couture Show (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iris van Herpen’s Fall 2018 Couture Show (photo courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

DO YOU THINK THE SONIA RYKIEL COLLECTION MERITS COUTURE STATUS? IF SO, WHY?

 

 

The Fashion Circus Begins: Men’s Fall 2018 Collections Kick Off

- - Fashion Shows, Trends

 

Loewe Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

Loewe Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Loewe)

The New Year has just begun and the fashion show hamster wheel is spinning faster than ever.  The Men’s Fall/Winter 2018 season kicked off in London where a number of New York editors missed the shows due to blizzard conditions. Then in was off to Florence for Pitti Uomo, a chic affair showcasing some of the most dandy and chicest menswear collections in Europe; meanwhile, Milan offered plenty of bold, cutting edge trends. Although both London and Milan have shortened their show schedules, there was still plenty of great fashion to see, including all the co-ed shows, which just may become runway’s future.

Paris is winding down, but the biggest news out of the fashion capital was the announcement that Kim Jones, the Men’s Artistic Director for Louis Vuitton since 2011, is leaving the company. Jones presented his final show for Louis Vuitton on Thursday and received a standing ovation as he walked side by side with supermodels Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss. Now that’s making an exit!

But now the guessing game begins, who will replace Jones and where will Jones end up next?

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Naomi Campbell, Kim Jones and Kate Moss (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Although the season is still going strong, here are a few key menswear trends so far:

LOGOMANIA

Logo’s are back and better than ever. The logo craze was first reserved for accessories, but today, companies are branding their names on everything from intarsia knits to fur coats (hello Fendi).

Fendi Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Fendi Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Louis Vuitton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Iceberg Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Iceberg Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Iceberg)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

UTALITARIAN

It’s a throwback to the nineties, as utilitarian inspired looks ruled the runways from London to Paris.

Rick Owens Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Rick Owens Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Haider Ackermann Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Belstaff Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Belstaff Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Belstaff)

Craig Green Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Craig Green Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Gosha Rubchinskiy Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Prada Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

TAILOR MADE

Suit-Up. Sharp, tailored suits made their mark on the runway as the classic looks take a modern turn, complete with ties and all.

Giorgio Armani Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Giorgio Armani Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Ermenegildo Zegna Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Brooks Brothers Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Kiton Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Neil Barrett Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

 

GOOD SPORT

The athleisure trend is still going strong as streetwear inspired looks continue to take center stage.

Off-White Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Off-White Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

MSGM Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Valentino Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Facetasm Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Stella McCartney Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

Stella McCartney Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Stella McCartney)

 

FIT TO PRINT

Designers are playing mix-and-match this season as head to toe prints are making a splash.

Versace Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Versace Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dolce & Gabbana Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Missoni Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Missoni Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Missoni)

Vivienne Westwood Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Vivienne Westwood Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood)

Pringle of Scotland Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

Pringle of Scotland Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland)

 

BRAVE THE COLD

Terrific outerwear was all over the runway, but one of the key outerwear trends were shearling jackets that were effortless yet cozy.

Brunello Cucinelli Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Brunello Cucinelli Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Ralph Lauren Purple Label Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Ralph Lauren)

Dsquared2 Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Dsquared2 Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.com)

Tods Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Tods Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Tods)

Band of Outsiders Men's 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

Band of Outsiders Men’s 2018 Fall Collection (Photo Courtesy of Band of Outsiders)

 

 TELL US, WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MENSWEAR TREND THIS SEASON?

Pre-Fall 2018: What Does the Season Really Mean?

- - Fashion Shows
Erdem Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Erdem Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

In the world of fashion, pre-fall is many things.

It’s the longest-running season, opening to buyers and press in November and wrapping up on the heels of spring couture in January. Generally, pre-fall collections offer more commercial looks than the main runway seasons, giving retailers the opportunity to present new merchandise to their customers between the fall and spring collections. It has also become the most important sales season with merchandise sitting on the sales floor for up to six months. But in today’s world, it is also becoming increasingly difficult to define the season, as designers show various interpretations of what exactly “pre-fall” means.

Tory Burch Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Tory Burch Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

The name (pre-fall) alludes to autumn, but the deliveries hit stores in the beginning of summer. Designers present everything from fur coats to cotton eyelet dresses and everything in between. So the terminology is confusing to everyone – designers, retailers, and consumers – so shouldn’t the season be looked at as a transitional one? Shouldn’t it be a season that offers a variety of weights and styles to satisfy both a customer looking for a summer outfit in July that they can transition into fall, as well as someone buying a coat or knit that they can wear through the colder months?

In additional to addressing transitional weather, pre-fall can also be a prelude to the next runway collection; an opportunity to test what works and doesn’t work with clients. For many designers, pre-fall can help lay-out the groundwork for many of the shapes and ideas that appear in the following season.

On an ethical note, there are just too many clothes out there; designers are producing too much instead of considering the outcome. So many designers are churning out ‘bestsellers’ and collections that have no point or value to the system; stores are buying them to keep up with the never-ending seasonal trends. It leads to the same clothes in all the stores with less than stellar sales.

So while many in the industry ponder on what the season means to them and how the pre-fall model varies for every designer, here are some of the highlights from the Pre-Fall 2018 season so far:

YARN IT ALL

Miles beyond the plain –Jane sweater, a wonderful tactile world of cozy knits await from chic sweater dresses to feminine sweaters.

Canel Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Chanel Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Pringle of Scotland Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Pringle of Scotland Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Prabal Gurung Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Prabal Gurung Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Victoria Beckham Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Victoria Beckham Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

PRINTS CHARMING

Designers are making a case for head to toe prints this season as patterns are mixed in fun and playful ways.

Gucci Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Gucci Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Altuzarra Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Altuzarra Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Fendi Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Fendi Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Versace Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Versace Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

SHIRT CIRCUIT

In a nod to the classics, the white button down shirt gets a fresh make-over this season.

Milly Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Milly Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Brock Collection Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Brock Collection Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Rag & Bone Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Rag & Bone Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

A.L.C. Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

A.L.C. Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

TOTALLY EIGHTIES

Designers dug deep into the archives and pulled out bright colors and body-conscious silhouettes.

Jonathan Simkhai Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Jonathan Simkhai Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Balmain Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Balmain Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Naeem Khan Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Naeem Khan Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Koché Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Koché Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

BEASTIE GIRLS

Things got plenty hairy this season in the form of oh-so-cozy yet beastly furs (in both real and faux).

Givenchy Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Givenchy Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Sonia Ryliel Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Sonia Ryliel Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Oscar de la Renta Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Oscar de la Renta Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of Vogue.Com)

Gucci

Gucci Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Gucci Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Carolina Herrera Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Carolina Herrera Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

SUMMER LOVIN

Then there are the designers who want to hold on to summer offering sweat little dresses to keep cool and look fresh.

La Vie Rebecca Taylor Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

La Vie Rebecca Taylor Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

See By Chloe Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

See By Chloe Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Sea Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

Sea Pre-Fall 2018 (Photo Courtesy of the Designer)

WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THE PRE-FALL SEASON AND HOW SHOULD YOUNG DESIGNERS APPROACH THE SEASON?