University of Fashion Blog

Category "Sewing"

HOW TO SHOP YOUR CLOSET & BRUSH UP ON YOUR EMBELLISHMENT SKILLS IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

A look from Carolina Herrera’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

The holiday season is around the corner, and while designers are offering plenty of fabulous festive looks in their holiday/resort collections, here at UOF, we want to teach you how to embroider, embellish and bead your own pieces. It’s no surprise that the art of embroidery is taking the fashion industry by storm. With COVID-19 lockdowns worldwide, many fashion creatives looked to crafty techniques to help pass the time and to revitalize and customize their wardrobes.

Of course, in the world of fashion insiders, customized clothing is widely embraced by celebrities, street-style stars, and influencers. And nothing shouts personalization more than peacocking embroidered and embellished items.

A look from Giambattista Valli’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

While embroidery dates back to 30,000 B.C., the intricate technique has become popular again and proves to be a mainstay in fashion settings. Embroidery is the craft of decorating textiles using a needle to apply thread or yarn. The word embroidery is derived from the French word broderie, meaning embellishment. In a variety of forms, embroidery has existed since the creation of fabric. The technique is practiced around the globe, but its origin stems from China and the Near East. The earliest embroidery can actually be traced back to Cro-Magnon days or 30,000 B.C. Archeological finds from this time period uncoveref fossilized remains of heavily hand-stitched and decorated apparel.

According to the encyclopedia source britannica.com, further examples of embroidery are found in China dating to the Warring States period between 5th and 3rd century B.C. In Sweden, the earliest finds of embroidery are from a period known as the Viking Age, around the 9th and 10th centuries. Around the year 1000, the technique of embroidery began to rise in Europe with the expansion of the Christian church and royalty gaining power. Richly decorated garments and ornaments in the form of wall hangings and tablecloths were commissioned to display power and wealth.

Embroidery was also important in the Medieval Islamic world because it was a symbol of high social status in Muslim societies. In cities such as Damascus, Istanbul, and Cairo, embroidery could be found on items such as handkerchiefs, flags, uniforms, robes, horse trappings, pouches, and covers.

However, by the 18th century England and its colonies, embroidery became a skill marking a girl’s passage into womanhood, as well as expressing rank and social standing. Soon after, however, the advancement of the embroidery machine and mass production came about in stages during the Industrial Revolution. The earliest machine embroidery, discovered in France in the mid-1800s, utilized a combination of machine looms and hand embroidery.

By the early 1900s, mail order catalogs and pattern papers helped embroidery become more widespread. The intricate craft was no longer just a hobby of the upper class, as it could now be done on less expensive fabrics.

A look from Valentino’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Present-day embroidery looks quite different from the delicate needlework of the past. Most contemporary embroidery is stitched with a computerized embroidery machine using patterns that are “digitized” with computer software. While the style and technique of modern embroidery may be different from its earliest roots, the main purpose of embroidery remains the same. Embroidery was, and will always be, a fashionable way for people to adorn their homes and themselves. We’re here to tell you that you can learn it at UoF. So…get into your closet, find an item that you think would benefit from an embellishment then crank up your computer and let us teach you how to bead and embroider. Upcycle, recycle and turn that garment into WOW!

Here are a few pieces to inspire you:

GLITZ UP YOUR FAVORITE DENIM JACKET

A look from Gucci’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

ADD FRINGE TO THAT LITTLE BLACK DRESS

A look from Jason Wu’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

EMBROIDER A SIMPLE PANT

A look from Christian Dior’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

EMBELLISH A KNIT SWEATER

A look from Max Mara’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

ADD APPLIQUÉ TO A SIMPLE SHEATH

A look from Oscar de la Renta’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

EMBROIDER A SHAWL

A look from Christian Dior’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

BEAD & APPLIQUÉ YOUR FAVORITE SKIRT

A look from Alexander McQueen’s Resort 2023 Collection. (Photo Credit: Vogue)

Check out our lesson previews to learn how to add embellishments of all types:

SILK RIBBON EMBROIDERY

TAMBOUR EMBROIDERY

TAMBOUR BEADING

BEADING NEEDLE EMBROIDERY

INTRO TO HAND EMBROIDERY

 

So, tell us, how excited are you to try these embroidery techniques?

Meet Our Instructors

 

We have lots of teachers! With 13 different disciplines and 500 videos to learn from, including draping, pattern making, sewing, fashion art, product development, knits, childrenswear, menswear, CAD fashion art, CAD pattern making, accessories design, fashion business and fashion lectures, we thought we’d introduce to more of them as we continue our blog series, Meet Our Instructors.

Pardon us for bragging but did you know that all of our instructors are either fashion college professors (from top fashion schools) or are fashion industry professionals?

Ever since we started offering 30-day free access offer to schools on March 4th due to Covid-19, and we launched a special promo to individual subscribers (was $189/now $169 using promo code NEWS21Y), we have tripled our subscribership!

So, for all of our new schools and subscribers here are a few more instructors that you should get to know. Click on their name to find out what they do in the industry and what they teach at UoF.

 

Kathlin Argiro – shares her extensive knowledge on how to start a fashion brand in her 3-part series for University of Fashion.

With a successful track record as a fashion designer and entrepreneur, Kathlin has sold her collection to top retailers, including Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdales.

In 2010, she joined the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) as an Adjunct Faculty member and has led high profile projects for First Lady Michelle Obama and for the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute.

Most recently, Kathlin began teaching in FIT’s MFA program. She also serves as a mentor for FIT’s Design Entrepreneurs NYC (DENYC) mini MBA Program.

In addition to her role at FIT, Kathlin has also taught at Parsons School of Design, Pratt, and Zhejiang Sci-Tech University (ZSTU), China.

Considered a fashion industry expert, Kathlin has been quoted in numerous publications and has been a guest panelist at industry conferences and universities, including Mount Holyoke College and Fordham University.

Passionate about sharing her experience and mentoring emerging designers, Kathlin launched a consulting business, Kathlin Argiro New York, in 2014.

kat@kathlinargiro.com

https://www.kathlinargironewyork.com/

Instagram: @kathlinargiro

Facebook: Kathlin Argiro

Richard Rosenfeld is a veteran in the fashion education industry and we are honored to have him teaching a series of model-drawing lessons for University of Fashion.

Richard has taught fashion model-drawing classes at Parsons since 1978 and at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) since 1989. During that period, he taught numerous famous designers, including Chris Benz, Isaac Mizrahi and Jason Wu, as well as New York illustrator (and UoF instructor), Steven Broadway.

Having attended the Rhode Island School of Design and as a graduate of Parsons with a degree in illustration, Richard has worked as a fashion illustrator for high profile publications such as Vogue, WWD, Glamour, The New York Times, and for various department stores and other fashion design clientele.

Richard’s philosophy for teaching fashion drawing focuses on developing good observational skills, the accurate depiction of textiles and various types of garments in silhouette, all with a personal point of view. His preferred medium of choice is a combination of pencil & watercolors.

Currently, Richard enjoys mentoring young design professionals and continues his passion for drawing from live models during the Covid-19 pandemic via ZOOM. He is curious to see how the health crisis will impact the future of this creative industry.

@richard_rosenfeld_art

 

Andrew Curwen’s lessons for University of Fashion demonstrate a designer’s respect for Savile Row workmanship. His hand sewn buttonhole lessons are pure works of art.

Andrew is a graduate of Parson’s BFA program and currently resides and works in Manhattan. With a background in bespoke construction and textile arts, his introduction to tailoring was taught and nurtured by a master Savile Row tailor.

The disparity between love and death are recurring themes throughout Andrew’s design work, something that could be described as a feminine brutality. Andrew works to design fashion for posterity that touches on the human condition.

Barbara Seggio has over 30 years of experience working in the fashion industry as a designer, technical designer and freelance design consultant. Her specialty is women’s sportswear and childrenswear design.

At the University of Fashion, Barbara shares her expertise in the areas of draping, pattern making, sewing and childrenswear. Barbara is also the editor of Sewing Techniques for Beginners and co-editor of Pattern Making Techniques for Beginners, UoF’s companion book series.

As an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Barbara teaches all disciplines of fashion design including: draping, patternmaking and sewing. Barbara’s accomplishments at FIT include: development of the childrenswear specialization, chairperson of the Childrenswear Advisory Board, member of the Sewing and Childrenswear Curriculum Committees and instructor in their high school weekend/summer program.

 

 

A Reminder to High Schools & Colleges

We are offering all high schools and colleges a free one-month access to our University of Fashion content library of over 500 educational videos. Teachers, should coordinate their school’s request and send that request to cs@UniversityofFashion.com, and we will provide your school with an access code. So…students, tell your teachers!

The goal of our free 30-day access to schools only, is to help schools salvage the balance of their semester. In preparation for the fall, in the event the pandemic continues into the next semester, we have waived our one-year school subscription minimum and are now offering special shortened subscription terms and rates.

Since 2008, University of Fashion has been providing individuals, groups, schools and public libraries with hands-on and lecture lessons in fashion design and fashion business. Many of our subscriber schools have been using our content in hybrid classrooms for years. Just read our testimonials.

As you use our library, we’d love your feedback. Tell us which are your favorite lessons and what new lessons you’d like to see? Send comments to us at cs@UniversityofFashion.com.

To Individual Subscribers

For those who are not currently enrolled in school but would like to take advantage of our library, we are now offering an individual membership deal. Get $20 off a yearly membership (was $189 now $169) using promo code NEWS21Y. Offers expire 12/31/20

SIGN UP HERE

 

Did you know that we have a very informative weekly blog covering relevant fashion topics? And, stay connected with us via our lively social media presence: Instagram- @uoffashion and Facebook – University of Fashion.

This is a new deal just offered by our UK-based publisher.
Our Video & Book Combination – Get 40% each book using discount code FRIENDS40 (offer expires 5/31/20)

Draping: Techniques for Beginners – https://www.laurenceking.com/us/product/draping-2/
Sewing: Techniques for Beginners – https://www.laurenceking.com/us/product/sewing/
Pattern Making: Techniques for Beginners – https://www.laurenceking.com/us/product/pattern-making/

Once you click one of the book links, above, you’ll see the book you selected in the middle of the screen. Click the shopping cart icon in the upper right of the same page then, on the order form provided, enter the discount code: FRIENDS40, and then click “Apply discount.” Then click “Proceed to checkout.”

Learning fashion design just got easier, thanks to UoF founder and author, Francesca Sterlacci

IMG_7759 (1)

Helen Ronan & Anastasia Scott (Laurence King Publishing), Francesca Sterlacci (University of Fashion), Dr. Jennifer Harmon (winner) and Jane Hegland (ITAA President)

In the fashion industry, so many of us can get swept up in the shiny end result presented on the runway during fashion week or the most viewed Instagram story of the day or perhaps, the must-have It Bag of the season.

And sometimes, the work of the dedicated, behind-the-scenes professionals who make It Bags and Instagram-worthy content possible in the first place, can go unnoticed. In this post, I’m not talking about hard-working designers, pattern makers and sewers—I’m going one step further behind the scenes to feature someone who works tirelessly to support designers in every which way she can—University of Fashion founder, Francesca Sterlacci. Read More

A Proud Look Back and a Sneak Peek into What’s Ahead at the University of Fashion

Happy 2018, U of F designers! 2017 has wrapped, and our hope for you in 2018 is that you take a moment to look back and recognize your accomplishments over the past year with as much excitement as you look forward to your new goals.

So, what are your top 3 proudest moments of 2017?

And your top 3 plans for 2018?

We’re asking ourselves the same questions. Read More

The finishing stitches

- - Sewing

Challenge: You’ve draped, drafted and sewn your original garment. Now, how to finish it in a way that honors your workmanship and gives your garment a professional quality?

Solution: Watch our four latest video releases. Read More

Pulling back the curtain on celebrity red carpet dresses

- - Red Carpet, Sewing

Following Chris Rock’s hosting brilliance, Lady Gaga’s moving performance and Leo’s it’s-about-time Oscar win, we are experiencing a bit of an awards season hangover. There were very few trends on this year’s Oscar red carpet as we saw everything from pastels to jewel tones, delicate lace to full-of-fabric confections. With so much information to process, we decided to take a bit of a backseat from the “Who wore it best?” hoopla, and offer up some interesting red carpet dressing facts we’ve learned from recent read, Hijacking the Runway by Teri Agins.

From pastels...

From pastels…

First, did you know that the Oscars are seen by 43 million worldwide? No wonder designers are eager to dress celebrities – just imagine the number of photographs, tweets and posts that float around in the days (even months) following an awards show – with the designer’s name attached! But, an important question to ask as an emerging designer is where will widespread press lead you and your budding company? Will your fledgling business be able to accommodate immediate requests? And ultimately, is the cost worth the “reward?”

...to jewel tones.

…to jewel tones.

If you are an emerging designer who is seeking this type of widespread press, consider the cost. According to Agins, fashion houses offer not only gowns to celebrities, but also hair and make up, limo rides to the big event and other perks that can cost upwards of $60,000 to $100,000 per event! Contracts including confidentiality agreements are often drawn up between celebrities and their handlers (stylists, publicists, managers, etc.) and fashion houses to keep under wraps these expensive exchanges.

Some celebrities receive up to 50 gowns from various designers to choose from for the big night. Rarely do celebrities keep (or purchase) the gowns that make the final cut.

...to full-of-fabric confections.

…to full-of-fabric confections.

As an emerging designer, the lure of celebrity endorsement and press can be very enticing. However, it is important to think as an emerging business person as well when representing your line. Whether a local celebrity requests one of your garments for an event, or Rooney Mara’s stylist must have one of your gowns for next year’s Academy Awards, keep your feet on the ground when hashing out the details. Remember, you created your unique piece down to the very last French dart (which by the way, shameless plug, is our latest video release). Honor the value of your work, as an example for others to do so as well.

It’s all in the details

- - Sewing

We are in the thick of New York Fashion Week and this season, we’ve seen changes galore in when designers present their collections, where collections are shown and who pops up and then disappears from the fashion scene. Read More

Spot the best and worst construction details this awards season

- - Draping, Red Carpet, Sewing

Awards season is right around the corner in addition to red carpet gowns and inspiration galore. This year, as you select your best and worst dressed lists, we have an added challenge. Be on the lookout for construction details. This week we’ve launched an extension video to our video on Draping a Bustier Bodice. Take a look at the images in the header – whether it’s Allison Williams in Armani Privé or Halle Berry in Nina Ricci – what you see on the red carpet is the result intricate construction underneath.

Read More

Announcing our first on-site Makerspace Fashion Workshop with the Westchester Library System

We have some very exciting news to report – in conjunction with the Westchester Library, the University of Fashion held its first Fashion Workshop led by U of F instructor Barbara Arata-Gavere earlier this month.  The University of Fashion was built on the belief in preserving the art and craft of fashion, and this first-time workshop embodied all that we are working toward. Read More